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Malvin Ruderman
Malvin Avram Ruderman (born 1927 in New York City) is an American physicist and astrophysicist.Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 Honors 4 ReferencesEducation[edit] Mal Ruderman received his A.B. degree from Columbia University
Columbia University
in 1945. His M.S. degree (1947) and Ph.D. (1951) are from the California Institute of Technology under the supervision of Robert Jay Finkelstein.[1][2] Career[edit] In 1951–53, Ruderman worked at Berkeley's Radiation Laboratory. He became an assistant professor at UC Berkeley in 1953, rising by 1964 to the rank of full professor. He moved to New York University
New York University
in 1964, and to Columbia University
Columbia University
in 1969, becoming Centennial Professor in 1980
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Thesis
A thesis or dissertation[1] is a document submitted in support of candidature for an academic degree or professional qualification presenting the author's research and findings.[2] In some contexts, the word "thesis" or a cognate is used for part of a bachelor's or master's course, while "dissertation" is normally applied to a doctorate, while in other contexts, the reverse is true.[3] The term graduate thesis is sometimes used to refer to both master's theses and doctoral dissertations.[4] The required complexity or quality of research of a thesis or dissertation can vary by country, university, or program, and the required minimum study period may thus vary significantly in duration. The word "dissertation" can at times be used to describe a treatise without relation to obtaining an academic degree
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David Pines
David Pines (born June 8, 1924) is the founding director of the Institute for Complex Adaptive Matter (ICAM) and the International Institute for Complex Adaptive Matter (I2CAM) (respectively, US-wide and international institutions dedicated to research in and the understanding of emergent phenomena), distinguished professor of physics, University of California, Davis, research professor of physics and professor emeritus of physics and electrical and computer engineering in the Center for Advanced Study, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), and a staff member in the office of the Materials, Physics, and Applications Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. His seminal contributions to the theory of many-body systems and to theoretical astrophysics have been recognized by two Guggenheim Fellowships, the Feenberg Medal, the Edward A
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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New York Academy Of Sciences
The New York Academy of Sciences
New York Academy of Sciences
(originally the Lyceum of Natural History) was founded in January 1817.[1] It is one of the oldest scientific societies in the United States.[3] An independent, non-profit organization with more than 20,000 members in 100 countries, the Academy's mission is "to advance scientific research and knowledge; to support scientific literacy; and to promote the resolution of society's global challenges through science-based solutions".[4] The current President and CEO is Ellis Rubinstein;[5] the current chair of the board of governors of the Academy is NYU professor and longtime Senior Vice President of all research for IBM, Paul Horn
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National Academy Of Sciences
The National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Sciences
(NAS) is a United States
United States
nonprofit, non-governmental organization. NAS is part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, along with the National Academy of Engineering
Engineering
(NAE) and the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). As a national academy, new members of the organization are elected annually by current members, based on their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Election to the National Academies is one of the highest honors in the scientific field. Members serve pro bono as "advisers to the nation" on science, engineering, and medicine
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Guggenheim Fellowship
Guggenheim Fellowships are grants that have been awarded annually since 1925 by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to those "who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts". The roll of Fellows includes numerous Nobel Laureates, Pulitzer and other prize winners. Each year, the foundation makes several hundred awards in each of two separate competitions:one open to citizens and permanent residents of the United States and Canada. the other to citizens and permanent residents of Latin America and the Caribbean.The performing arts are excluded, although composers, film directors, and choreographers are eligible. The fellowships are not open to students, only to "advanced professionals in mid-career" such as published authors
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Pulsar
A pulsar (from pulse and -ar as in quasar)[1] is a highly magnetized rotating neutron star or white dwarf that emits a beam of electromagnetic radiation. This radiation can be observed only when the beam of emission is pointing toward Earth (much like the way a lighthouse can be seen only when the light is pointed in the direction of an observer), and is responsible for the pulsed appearance of emission. Neutron stars are very dense, and have short, regular rotational periods. This produces a very precise interval between pulses that range from milliseconds to seconds for an individual pulsar. Pulsars are believed to be one of the candidates of the observed ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (see also centrifugal mechanism of acceleration). The precise periods of pulsars make them very useful tools. Observations of a pulsar in a binary neutron star system were used to indirectly confirm the existence of gravitational radiation
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Starquake (astrophysics)
A quake is the result when the surface of a planet, moon or star begins to shake, usually as the consequence of a sudden release of energy transmitted as seismic waves, and potentially with great violence.[1] The types of quakes include:Contents1 Earthquake 2 Moonquake 3 Marsquake 4 Venusquake 5 Planetquake 6 Sunquake 7 Starquake 8 See also 9 ReferencesEarthquake[edit] See also: Earthquake An earthquake is a phenomenon that results from the sudden release of stored energy in the Earth's crust that creates seismic waves. At the Earth's surface, earthquakes may manifest themselves by a shaking or displacement of the ground and sometimes cause tsunamis, which may lead to loss of life and destruction of property. An earthquake is caused by tectonic plates (sections of the Earth's crust) getting stuck and putting a strain on the ground. The strain becomes so great that rocks give way and fault lines occur. Moonquake[edit] "Moonquake" redirects here
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Neutron Star
A neutron star is the collapsed core of a large star which before collapse had a total of between 10 and 29 solar masses. Neutron
Neutron
stars are the smallest and densest stars, not counting hypothetical quark stars and strange stars.[1] Typically, neutron stars have a radius on the order of 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) and a mass between 1.4 and 3 solar masses.[2] They result from the supernova explosion of a massive star, combined with gravitational collapse, that compresses the core past the white dwarf star density to that of atomic nuclei
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Gordon Baym
Gordon Alan Baym (born July 1, 1935) is an American theoretical physicist. Born in New York City, he graduated from the Brooklyn Technical High School, and received his undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1956. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University
Harvard University
in 1960, studying under Julian Schwinger. He joined the physics faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1963, becoming a full professor in 1968. His areas of research range from condensed-matter physics to nuclear physics and astrophysics, as well as the history of physics. In 1962 he and Leo Kadanoff
Leo Kadanoff
collaborated on Quantum Statistical Mechanics: Green's Function Methods in Equilibrium and Nonequilibrium Problems. In 1969 he published Lectures on Quantum Mechanics, a widely used graduate textbook that, unconventionally, begins with photon polarization
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Doctoral Advisor
A doctoral advisor (also dissertation director or dissertation advisor) is a member of a university faculty whose role is to guide graduate students who are candidates for a doctorate, helping them select coursework, as well as shaping, refining and directing the students' choice of sub-discipline in which they will be examined or on which they will write a dissertation.[1] Students generally choose advisors based on their areas of interest within their discipline, their desire to work closely with particular graduate faculty, and the willingness and availability of those faculty to work with them. In some countries, the student's advisor serves as the chair of the doctoral examination or dissertation committees. In some cases, though, the person who serves those roles may be different from the faculty member who has most closely advised the student
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Berkeley Physics Course
The Berkeley Physics
Physics
Course is a series of college-level physics textbooks written mostly by UC Berkeley
UC Berkeley
professors.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] The series consists of the following five volumes, each of which was originally used in a one-semester course at Berkeley:Mechanics by Charles Kittel, et al.[1] Electricity and Magnetism by Edward M. Purcell Waves by Frank S. Crawford, Jr. Quantum Physics
Physics
by Eyvind H. Wichmann Statistical Physics
Physics
by Frederick ReifVolume 2, Electricity and Magnetism, by Purcell (Harvard), is particularly well known, and was influential for its use of relativity in the presentation of the subject at the introductory college level. Half a century later the book is still in print, in an updated version by authors Purcell and Morin
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RKKY Interaction
RKKY stands for Ruderman–Kittel–Kasuya–Yosida and refers to a coupling mechanism of nuclear magnetic moments or localized inner d- or f-shell electron spins in a metal by means of an interaction through the conduction electrons.The RKKY interaction is the J/t >> 1 limit of the double exchange interaction. The RKKY interaction was originally proposed by M. A. Ruderman and Charles Kittel of the University of California, Berkeley, as a means of explaining unusually broad nuclear spin resonance lines that had been observed in natural metallic silver. The theory uses second-order perturbation theory to describe an indirect exchange coupling whereby the nuclear spin of one atom interacts with a conduction electron through the hyperfine interaction, and this conduction electron then interacts with another nuclear spin, thus creating a correlation energy between the two nuclear spins
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New York University
Coordinates: 40°43′48″N 73°59′42″W / 40.73000°N 73.99500°W / 40.73000; -73.99500New York UniversityLatin: Universitas Neo EboracensisMotto Perstare et praestare (Latin)Motto in EnglishTo persevere and to excelType Private[1]Established 1831[1]Endowment $3.991 billion (2017)[2]Budget $11.945 billion (fiscal 2018)[3]Chairman William R. Berkley[4]President Andrew D. HamiltonProvost Katherine E
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Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
(LBNL or LBL), commonly referred to as Berkeley Lab, is a United States national laboratory located in the Berkeley Hills
Berkeley Hills
near Berkeley, California
Berkeley, California
that conducts scientific research on behalf of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by the University of California. The laboratory overlooks the University of California, Berkeley's main campus.Contents1 History 2 Lab Directors 3 Science mission 4 Operations and governance 5 Scientific achievements, inventions, and discoveries 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The laboratory was founded in August 26, 1931 by Ernest Lawrence
Ernest Lawrence
as the Radiation Laboratory of the University of California, Berkeley associated with the Physics Department
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