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Malé
Malé (/ˈmɑːl/, locally [ˈmɑːlɛ]; Dhivehi: މާލެ) is the capital and most populous city in the Republic of Maldives. With a population of 215,879[2] and an area of 8.30 square kilometres (3.20 sq mi), it is also one of the most densely populated cities in the world.[3][4] The city is geographically located at the southern edge of North Malé Atoll (Kaafu Atoll).[5] Administratively, the city consists of a central island, an airport island, and two other islands governed by the Malé City Council. Traditionally it was the King's Island, from where the ancient royal dynasties ruled and where the palace was located. The city was then called Mahal.[6] Formerly it was a walled city surrounded by fortifications and gates (doroshi)
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Census
A census is the procedure of systematically enumerating, and acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. This term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agricultural, traditional culture, business, supplies, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every ten years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practices.[1][2] The word is of Latin origin: during the Roman Republic, the census was a list that kept track of all adult males fit for military service
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Ibn Battuta

Ibn Battuta (/ˌɪbənbætˈttɑː/; 24 February 1304 – 1368/1369)[a] was a Muslim Berber-Moroccan scholar and explorer who widely travelled the Old world.[1][2] Over a period of thirty years, Ibn Battuta visited most of the Old World, including Central Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, China, and Iberian Peninsula
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Dhoni

Mahendra Singh Dhoni (pronunciation 

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Urban Area
An urban area, or built-up area, is a human settlement with a high population density and infrastructure of built environment. Urban areas are created through urbanization and are categorized by urban morphology as cities, towns, conurbations or suburbs. In urbanism, the term contrasts to rural areas such as villages and hamlets; in urban sociology or urban anthropology it contrasts with natural environment. The creation of early predecessors of urban areas during the urban revolution led to the creation of human civilization with modern urban planning, which along with other human activities such as exploitation of natural resources led to a human impact on the environment. "Agglomeration effects" are in the list of the main consequences of increased rates of firm creation since. This is due to conditions created by a greater level of industrial activity in a given region
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Wet Season
The wet season (sometimes called the rainy season) is the time of year when most of a region's average annual rainfall occurs. Generally the season lasts at least a month.[1] The term 'green season' is also sometimes used as a euphemism by tourist authorities.[2] Areas with wet seasons are dispersed across portions of the tropics and subtropics.[3] Under the Köppen climate classification, for tropical climates, a wet season month is defined as a month where average precipitation is 60 millimetres (2.4 in) or more.[4] In contrast to areas with savanna climates and monsoon regimes, Mediterranean climates have wet winters and dry summers
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Dry Season
The dry season is a yearly period of low rainfall, especially in the tropics. The weather in the tropics is dominated by the tropical rain belt, which moves from the northern to the southern tropics and back over the course of the year. The tropical rain belt lies in the southern hemisphere roughly from October to March; during that time the northern tropics have a dry season with sparser precipitation, and days are typically sunny throughout. From April to September, the rain belt lies in the northern hemisphere, and the southern tropics have their dry season. Under the Köppen climate classification, for tropical climates, a dry season month is defined as a month when average precipitation is below 60 millimetres (2.4 in).[1] During the dry season, humidity is very low, causing some watering holes and rivers to dry up. This lack of water (and hence of food) may force many grazing animals to migrate to more fertile spots
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