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Major (France)
Major
Major
(French: Major) in France, is a senior superior military rank (French: grade militaire) across various military and security institutions with history dating back well beyond the 18th century. Typically, the contemporary rank of Major
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French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
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Governor
A governor is, in most cases, a public official with the power to govern the executive branch of a non-sovereign or sub-national level of government, ranking under the head of state. In federations, governor may be the title of a politician who governs a constituent state and may be either appointed or elected. The power of the individual governor can vary dramatically between political systems, with some governors having only nominal or largely ceremonial power, while others having a complete control over the entire government. Historically, the title can also apply to the executive officials acting as representatives of a chartered company which has been granted exercise of sovereignty in a colonial area, such as the British East India Company
East India Company
or the Dutch East India
India
Company
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Major General
Major
Major
general (abbreviated MG,[1] Maj. Gen. and similar) is a military rank used in many countries. It is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general. The disappearance of the "sergeant" in the title explains the apparently confusing phenomenon whereby a lieutenant general outranks a major general. (Although a major outranks a lieutenant, a lieutenant outranks a sergeant-major). In the Commonwealth
Commonwealth
and the United States, it is a division commander's rank subordinate to the rank of lieutenant general and senior to the ranks of brigadier and brigadier general
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General
A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.[1] The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer and as a specific rank. It originates in the 16th century, as a shortening of captain general, which rank was taken from Middle French capitaine général. The adjective general had been affixed to officer designations since the late medieval period to indicate relative superiority or an extended jurisdiction. Today, the title of "General" is known in some countries as a four-star rank. However different countries use different systems of stars for senior ranks
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Officer Corps
An officer is a member of an armed force or uniformed service who holds a position of authority. In its broadest sense, the term "officer" includes non-commissioned officers and warrant officers. However, when used without further detail, the term "officer" almost always refers to commissioned officers, the more senior portion of a force who derive their authority from a commission from the head of state of a sovereign nation-state.Contents1 Numbers 2 Legal relevance 3 Terminological details in the U.S. 4 Commissioned officers4.1 United Kingdom 4.2 United States4.2.1 Other U.S. officer commissioning programs, active and discontinued4.3 Commonwealth of Nations5 Non-commissioned officers 6 Warrant officers 7 Officer ranks and accommodation 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksNumbers[edit]An Indonesian army
Indonesian army
officer serving as a ceremonial field commanderThe proportion of officers varies greatly
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Sergeant Major General
Sergeant
Sergeant
major general is a now mostly extinct military rank. A prominent example was Philip Skippon in the English New Model Army
New Model Army
as organized by Oliver Cromwell. Over the course of the 17th century, the increasing professionalisation of armies saw sergeant major general become the most junior of the general ranks. At the same time, the sergeant portion of the title was more and more commonly dropped; by the early 18th century, the rank's name had been permanently shortened to major general. Since sergeant major general had ranked below lieutenant general, the newly named rank of major general appeared to create a precedence issue, in that a major outranks a lieutenant but a lieutenant general outranks a major general. This continues to cause confusion to those unfamiliar with the history of the rank, particularly in those armies using insignia similar to the British Army
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Lieutenant General
Lieutenant
Lieutenant
general, lieutenant-general and similar (abbrev Lt. Gen, LTG and similar) is a three-star military rank (NATO code OF-8) used in many countries. The rank traces its origins to the Middle Ages, where the title of lieutenant general was held by the second in command on the battlefield, who was normally subordinate to a captain general. In modern armies, lieutenant general normally ranks immediately below general and above major general; it is equivalent to the navy rank of vice admiral, and in air forces with a separate rank structure, it is equivalent to air marshal
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Général De Division
Divisional general is a rank of general in command of a division. Examples would include the Spanish general de división, the French général de division and the Polish generał dywizji. For convenience such ranks are often translated into English as "major-general", the equivalent rank used by most English-speaking nations. The corresponding NATO code is OF-7, or a "two-star rank". Some countries of Latin America such as Brazil and Chile use divisional general as the equivalent of "lieutenant-general". This corresponding NATO code is OF-8, or a "three-star rank" for these countries. In Japan and Taiwan the rank of lieutenant-general is equivalent to divisional general.Contents1 Description 2 Bosnia 3 Brazil 4 France 5 Italy 6 Mexico 7 Poland 8 Spain 9 Switzerland 10 Serbia and Yugoslavia 11 References 12 See alsoDescription[edit] The rank is mostly used in countries where it is used as a modern alternative to a previous older rank of major-general
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Ancien Régime
The Ancien Régime
Ancien Régime
(/ˌɒ̃sjæ̃ reɪˈʒiːm/; French: [ɑ̃.sjɛ̃ ʁeʒim]; French for "old regime") was the political and social system of the Kingdom of France
Kingdom of France
from the Late Middle Ages (circa 15th century) until 1789, when hereditary monarchy and the feudal system of French nobility
French nobility
were abolished by the French Revolution.[1] The Ancien Régime
Ancien Régime
was ruled by the late Valois and Bourbon dynasties. The term is occasionally used to refer to the similar feudal systems of the time elsewhere in Europe
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Colonel
Colonel
Colonel
(abbreviated Col., Col or COL and pronounced /ˈkɜːrnəl/, similar to "kernel") is a senior military officer rank below the general officer ranks. However, in some small military forces, such as those of Iceland
Iceland
or the Vatican, colonel is the highest rank. It is also used in some police forces and paramilitary organizations. Historically, in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a colonel was typically in charge of a regiment in an army. Modern usage varies greatly, and in some cases the term is used as an honorific title that may have no direct relationship to military service. The rank of colonel is typically above the rank of lieutenant colonel. The rank above colonel is typically called brigadier, brigade general or brigadier general. Equivalent naval ranks may be called captain or ship-of-the-line captain
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List Of French Monarchs
The monarchs of the Kingdom of France
Kingdom of France
and its predecessors (and successor monarchies) ruled from the establishment of the Kingdom of the Franks
Franks
in 486 until the fall of the Second French Empire
Second French Empire
in 1870, with several interruptions. Sometimes included as "Kings of France"[1] are the kings of the Franks of the Merovingian dynasty, which ruled from 486 until 751,[2] and of the Carolingians, who ruled until 987 (with some interruptions). The Capetian dynasty, the male-line descendants of Hugh Capet, included the first rulers to adopt the title of "King of France" for the first time with Philip II (r. 1180–1223). The Capetians ruled continuously from 987 to 1792 and again from 1814 to 1848
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French Air Force
World War I (French: Première Guerre mondiale) World War II (French: Seconde Guerre mondiale) Indochina War (French: Guerre d'Indochine) Algerian War (French: Guerre d'Algérie) Chadian–Libyan conflict (French: Conflit tchado-libyen) Gulf War (French: Guerre du Golfe) Kosovo War (French: Guerre du Kosovo) War on TerrorWar in Afghanistan
Afghanistan
(2001–2014) (French: Guerre d' Afghanistan
Afghanistan
(2001–2014))Opération Harmattan (French: Opération Harmattan) Occidental-Arab Coalition (French: Coalition Arabo-Occidentale)Website www.defense.gouv.fr/airCommandersChief of Staff of the French Air Force Général d'armée aérienne André Lanata, since September 21, 2015InsigniaIdentification symbolThe French Air Force
Air Force
(Armée de l'Air Française) [aʀme də lɛʀ], literally Aerial Army) is the Air Force
Air Force
Arm of the French Armed Forces
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First French Empire
French Revolutionary Wars •  Constitution adopted 18 May 1804 •  Coronation of Napoleon
Napoleon
I 2 December 1804 •  Treaty of Tilsit 7 July 1807 •  Invasion of Russia 24 June 1812 •  Treaty of Fontainebleau 11 April 1814 •  Hundred Days 20 March – 7 July 1815Area •  1812 [4] 860,000 km2 (330,000 sq
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French Defence Health Service
French Defence Health Service (Service de santé des armées or SSA) is responsible for medical and sanitary support of the French military and of all institutions placed under the authority of the French Ministry of Defence. It is a joint service, and its central administration (direction centrale du service de santé des armées, DCSSA) is under the direct control of the Chief of the defence staff (chef d'état-major des armées (CEMA)). Its significant presence on French territory ensures adequate support for French operations in overseas theatres. It provides hospital care services, administers medicals for military personnel, and gives expertise in disease prevention, and medical, dental, pharmaceutical, paramedical and veterinary research and education. Physicians and chemists receive initial training in Bordeaux
Bordeaux
and Lyon. Then, they are sent to the Val de Grâce Hospital in Paris
Paris
for applied training
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Combat Medic
Combat medics or field medics (or medics) are military personnel who have been trained to at least an EMT-B level (16-week course in the U.S. Army),[1] and are responsible for providing first aid and frontline trauma care on the battlefield. They are also responsible for providing continuing medical care in the absence of a readily available physician, including care for disease and battle injuries. Combat medics are normally co-located with the combat troops they serve in order to easily move with the troops and monitor ongoing health.Contents1 Geneva convention protection 2 History 3 Red Cross, Red Crescent, and MDA 4 Modern day 5 See also 6 Notes 7 Further reading 8 References 9 External linksGeneva convention protection[edit] In 1864, sixteen European states adopted the first-ever Geneva Convention to save lives and alleviate the suffering of wounded and sick persons in the battlefield
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