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Mahavira
Mahavira
Mahavira
(/məˌhɑːˈvɪərə/; IAST: Bhagavān Mahāvīra), also known as Vardhamāna, was the twenty-fourth Tirthankara
Tirthankara
(ford-maker) of Jainism. In the Jain tradition, it is believed that Mahavira
Mahavira
was born in the early part of the 6th century BC into a royal family in what is now Bihar, India. At the age of thirty, abandoning all worldly possessions, he left his home in pursuit of spiritual awakening and became an ascetic. For the next twelve and a half years, Mahavira
Mahavira
practiced intense meditation and severe austerities, after which he is believed to have attained Kevala Jnana
Kevala Jnana
(omniscience). He preached for thirty years, and is believed by Jains to have died in the 6th century BC
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Lion
P. l. atrox P. l. europaea P. l. melanochaita (Sensu stricto) P. l. sinhaleyus P. l. spelaea P. l. vereshchaginiDistribution of Panthera
Panthera
leo in Africa
Africa
and Eurasia, in the past and present.Synonyms Felis
Felis
leo Linnaeus, 1758The lion ( Panthera
Panthera
leo) is a species in the family Felidae
Felidae
and a member of the genus Panthera. It is the second largest extant species after the tiger. It exhibits a pronounced sexual dimorphism; males are larger than females with a typical weight range of 150 to 250 kg (331 to 551 lb) for the former and 120 to 182 kg (265 to 401 lb) for the latter
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Mahavihara
Mahavihara
Mahavihara
(Mahāvihāra) is the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Pali
Pali
term for a great vihara ( Buddhist
Buddhist
monastery) and is used to describe a monastic complex of viharas.Contents1 Mahaviharas of India1.1 Nalanda 1.2 Odantapura 1.3 Vikramashila2 Mahaviharas of Bangladesh2.1 Somapura 2.2 Jagaddala3 Mahavihara
Mahavihara
of Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksMahaviharas of India[edit] A range of monasteries grew up in ancient Magadha
Magadha
(modern Bihar) and Bengal
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Cubit
The cubit is an ancient unit of length that had several definitions according to each of the various different cultures that used the unit. These definitions ranged between 444 mm and 529.2 mm. The unit was based on the forearm length from the tip of the middle finger to the bottom of the elbow. Cubits of various lengths were employed in many parts of the world in antiquity, during the Middle Ages and as recently as Early Modern Times
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Foot (unit)
The foot (pl. feet; abbreviation: ft; symbol: ′, the prime symbol) is a unit of length in the imperial and US customary systems of measurement. Since 1959, both units have been defined by international agreement as equivalent to 0.3048 meters exactly. In both systems, the foot comprises 12 inches and three feet compose a yard. Historically the "foot" was a part of many local systems of units, including the Greek, Roman, Chinese, French, and English systems. It varied in length from country to country, from city to city, and sometimes from trade to trade
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Gold (color)
Gold, also called golden, is a colour. The web color gold is sometimes referred to as golden to distinguish it from the color metallic gold. The use of gold as a color term in traditional usage is more often applied to the color "metallic gold" (shown below). The first recorded use of golden as a color name in English was in 1300 to refer to the element gold and in 1423 to refer to blond hair.[1] Metallic gold, such as in paint, is often called goldtone or gold tone. In heraldry, the French word or is used.[2] In model building, the color gold is different from brass. A shiny or metallic silvertone object can be painted with transparent yellow to obtain goldtone, something often done with Christmas decorations.Contents1 Metallic gold1.1 Gold (metallic gold) 1.2 Web color
Web color
gold vs
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Mahaveera (film)
Mahaveera is a 1988 Bollywood film directed by Naresh Saigal and starring Dharmendra, Raaj Kumar, Dimple Kapadia, Raj Babbar, Beena Banerjee, Utpal Dutt.[1] Soundtrack[edit]# Title Singer(s)1 "Mujhe Tukar Tukar Na Dekh Balma" Sadhana Sargam2 "Is Bairan Taqdeer Ko" Asha Bhosle3 "Wafa Se Chala Hai Mohabbat Ka Naam" Raj Kumar, Salma Agha4 "Kachiyan Kaliyan Na Tod We" Asha Bhosle5 "Teri Nahi Meri Nahi" Amit Kumar, Mahendra Kapoor6 "Oh Shera Waliye Oh Mehra Waliye" Mohammed AzizReferences[edit]^ "Mahaveera LP Records". ebay. Retrieved 19 October 2014. External links[edit]Mahaveera on IMDbThis article about a Hindi film of the 1980s is a stub
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Siddhartha Of Kundagrama
Siddhartha or Siddharth is the birth name of the founder of Buddhism, Gautama Buddha. Siddhartha may also refer to:Contents1 Books 2 Film and TV 3 Music 4 Organisations 5 People5.1 Given name 5.2 Surname6 OtherBooks[edit] Siddhartha (novel), a fictional book about the life of a man (not the Buddha) named Siddhartha, by Hermann HesseFilm and TV[edit] Siddhartha (1972 film), the 1972 film of t
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Ethics Of Jainism
Jain ethical code prescribes two dharmas or rules of conduct. One for those who wish to become ascetic and another for the śrāvaka (householders). Five fundamental vows are prescribed for both votaries. These vows are observed by śrāvakas (householders) partially and are termed as anuvratas (small vows). Ascetics observe these fives vows more strictly and therefore observe complete abstinence. These five vows are:-Ahiṃsā (Non-violence) Satya
Satya
(Truth) Asteya
Asteya
(Non-stealing) Brahmacharya
Brahmacharya
(Chastity) Aparigraha
Aparigraha
(Non-possession)According to Jain text, Puruşārthasiddhyupāya:[1]All these subdivisions (injury, falsehood, stealing, unchastity, and attachment) are hiṃsā as indulgence in these sullies the pure nature of the soul. Falsehood etc
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Gunasthana
Guṇasthāna (Sanskrit: "levels of virtue") are the fourteen stages of spiritual development and growth through which a soul gradually passes before it attains moksha (liberation).[1] According to Jainism, it is a state of soul from a complete dependence on karma to the state of complete dissociation from it. Here the word virtue does not mean an ordinary moral quality, but it stands for the nature of soul — knowledge, belief and conduct.Contents1 Overview 2 The Fourteen stages 3 The destruction of causes of bondage 4 The destruction of karmas 5 See also 6 References 7 ReferencesOverview[edit] The fourteen Gunasthāna represents the soul's gradual manifestation of the innate qualities of knowledge, belief and conduct in a more and more perfect form.[2][3] Following are the stages of spiritual development:[4][5][6]Head Gunasthāna MeaningBelief (Rationality in perception) 1. Mithyātva The stage of wrong believer (Gross ignorance)2
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Aparigraha
In Hinduism
Hinduism
and Jainism, aparigraha (Sanskrit: अपरिग्रह) is the virtue of non-possessiveness, non-grasping or non-greediness.[1] Aparigrah is the opposite of parigrah, and refers to keeping the desire for possessions to what is necessary or important, depending on one's life stage and context
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Brahmacharya
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-DussehraRaksha Bandhan Ganesh Chat
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Tattva (Jainism)
Jain philosophy
Jain philosophy
explains that seven tattva (truths or fundamental principles) constitute reality.[1] These are:[2]—jīva- the soul which is characterized by consciousness ajīva- the non-soul āsrava (influx)- inflow of auspicious and evil karmic matter into the soul. bandha (bondage)- mutual intermingling of the soul and karmas. samvara (stoppage)- obstruction of the inflow of karmic matter into the soul. nirjara (gradual dissociation)- separation or falling-off of part of karmic matter from the soul. mokṣha (liberation)- complete annihilation of all karmic matter (bound with any particular soul
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Dharma (Jainism)
Dharma
Dharma
(/ˈdɑːrmə/;[8] Sanskrit: धर्म, translit. dharma, pronounced [dʱəɾmə] ( listen); Pali: धम्म, translit. dhamma, translit
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Namokar Mantra
Ṇamōkāra mantra is the most significant mantra in Jainism.[1][2] This is the first prayer recited by the Jains while meditating. The mantra is also variously referred to as the Pancha Namaskāra Mantra, Navakāra Mantra
Mantra
or Namaskāra Mantra. While reciting this mantra, the devotee bows with respect to the Panch Parameshti (the Supreme Five):Arihant— Those who have destroyed the four inimical karmas Siddha
Siddha
— The liberated souls Acharyas — The spiritual leaders or Preceptors Upadhayaya — Preceptor of less advanced ascetics[3] Sādhu — The monks or sages in the worldThere is no mention of any particular names of the gods or any specific person. The prayer is done towards the guṇa (the good qualities) of the gods, teachers and the saints
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Micchami Dukkadam
Micchāmi Dukkaḍaṃ (मिच्छामि दुक्कडम्) is an ancient Indian phrase, which is translated from Prakrit
Prakrit
to literally mean "may all the evil that has been done be fruitless." [1] It is commonly used to seek forgiveness and to mean, "If I have offended you in any way, knowingly or unknowingly, in thought, word or deed, then I seek your forgiveness."[2] It is used widely in the Jain religion on the last day ( Samvatsari
Samvatsari
or Kshamavani) of Paryushana, the most important annual holy event of the Jain calendar.[3][4] As a matter of ritual, Jains greet their friends and relatives on this last day with Micchāmi Dukkaḍaṃ, seeking their forgiveness. No private quarrel or dispute should be carried beyond this time
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