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Mahalia Jackson
Mahalia Jackson
Mahalia Jackson
(/məˈheɪliə/ mə-HAYL-ee-ə; October 26, 1911 – January 27, 1972) was an American gospel singer. Possessing a powerful contralto voice,[2] she was referred to as "The Queen of Gospel".[1][3][4] She became one of the most influential gospel singers in the world and was heralded internationally as a singer and civil rights activist.[5] She was described by entertainer Harry Belafonte as "the single most powerful black woman in the United States".[5] She recorded about 30 albums (mostly for Columbia Records) during her career, and her 45 rpm records included a dozen "golds"—million-sellers. "I sing God's music because it makes me feel free", Jackson once said about her choice of gospel, adding, "It gives me hope
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Carl Van Vechten
Carl Van Vechten
Carl Van Vechten
(June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and artistic photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein.[1]Contents1 Life and career 2 Archives and museum collections 3 Works3.1 Posthumous4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksLife and career[edit] Born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, he was the youngest child of Charles and Ada Van Vechten.[2]:14 He graduated from Washington High School in 1898,[3] and later the University of Chicago[4] in 1903. In 1906, he moved to New York City. He was hired as the assistant music critic at The New York Times.[5] His interest in opera had him take a leave of absence from the paper in 1907, so as to travel to Europe to explore opera.[1] While in England he married his long-time friend from Cedar Rapids, Anna Snyder
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Fisk University
Fisk University
Fisk University
is a private historically black university in Nashville, Tennessee. The university was founded in 1866 and its 40-acre (160,000 m2) campus is a historic district listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1930, Fisk was the first African-American institution to gain accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Accreditations for specialized programs soon followed.Contents1 History 2 Campus 3 Music, art, and literature collections3.1 Alfred Stieglitz
Alfred Stieglitz
Collection4 Science programs4.1 Fisk-Vanderbilt Bridge Program5 Ranking 6 Athletics 7 Notable alumni 8 Notable faculty 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit]University namesake Clinton B. FiskA class c
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Mamie Smith
Mamie Smith
Mamie Smith
(née Mamie Robinson; May 26, 1883 – September 16, 1946) was an American vaudeville singer, dancer, pianist and actress. As a vaudeville singer she performed in various styles, including jazz and blues. In 1920, she entered blues history as the first African-American
African-American
artist to make vocal blues recordings
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New Orleans
New Orleans
New Orleans
(/ˈɔːrl(i)ənz, ɔːrˈliːnz/,[4][5] locally /ˈnɔːrlənz/; French: La Nouvelle- Orléans
Orléans
[la nuvɛlɔʁleɑ̃] ( listen)) is a major United States
United States
port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana. The population of the city was 343,829 as of the 2010 U.S. Census.[6][7] The New Orleans metropolitan area
New Orleans metropolitan area
(New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner Metropolitan Statistical Area) had a population of 1,167,764 in 2010 and was the 46th largest in the United States.[8] The New Orleans–Metairie–Bogalusa Combined Statistical Area, a larger trading area, had a 2010 population of 1,452,502.[9] Before Hurricane Katrina, Orleans Parish
Orleans Parish
was the most populous parish in Louisiana
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Genu Varum
Genu varum
Genu varum
(also called bow-leggedness, bandiness, bandy-leg, and tibia vara), is a varus deformity marked by (outward) bowing at the knee, which means that the lower leg is angled inward (medially) in relation to the thigh's axis, giving the limb overall the appearance of an archer's bow. Usually medial angulation of both lower limb bones (femur and tibia) is involved.Contents1 Causes1.1 Childhood 1.2 Blount's disease2 Diagnosis 3 Treatment3.1 Blount's disease4 Prognosis 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksCauses[edit] If a child is sickly, either with rickets or any other ailment that prevents ossification of the bones, or is improperly fed, the bowed condition may persist. Thus the chief cause of this deformity is rickets. Skeletal problems, infection, and tumors can also affect the growth of the leg, sometimes giving rise to a one-sided bow-leggedness
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Mississippi River
The Mississippi
Mississippi
River
River
is the chief river of the second-largest drainage system on the North American continent, second only to the Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
drainage system.[13][14] The stream is entirely within the United States
United States
(although its drainage basin reaches into Canada), its source is in northern Minnesota
Minnesota
and it flows generally south for 2,320 miles (3,730 km)[14] to the Mississippi
Mississippi
River
River
Delta in the Gulf of Mexico. With its many tributaries, the Mississippi's watershed drains all or parts of 31 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces between the Rocky and Appalachian Mountains. The Mississippi
Mississippi
ranks as the fourth-longest and fifteenth-largest river in the world by discharge
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Right Hand Of Fellowship
The Right Hand of Fellowship is a ritual intended to welcome a new member into the fellowship of a congregation or welcoming a new minister into the fellowship of ministers. It is based on Paul's letter to the Galatians, chapter 2 verse 9, where Paul says that three disciples of Jesus "gave me and Barnabas their right hands of fellowship" (Greek: δεξὰς ἔδωκαν ἐμοὶ καὶ Βαρναβᾷ κοινωνίας), bonding them together as members of the new Christian church
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Chicago, Illinois
Chicago
Chicago
(/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ, -ˈkɔː-/ ( listen)), officially the City
City
of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States. With over 2.7 million residents, it is also the most populous city in both the state of Illinois
Illinois
and the Midwestern United States. It is the county seat of Cook County
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Great Migration (African American)
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era
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Tuskegee Institute
Tuskegee University
University
is a private, historically black university (HBCU) located in Tuskegee, Alabama, United States. It was established by Booker T. Washington. The campus is designated as the Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site by the National Park Service
National Park Service
and is the only one in the U.S. to have this designation. The university was home to scientist George Washington Carver
George Washington Carver
and to World War II's Tuskegee Airmen. Tuskegee University
University
offers 40 bachelor's degree programs, 17 master's degree programs, a 5-year accredited professional degree program in architecture, 4 doctoral degree programs, and the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. The university is home to over 3,100 students from the U.S. and 30 foreign countries
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Stevedore
A stevedore, longshoreman, or dockworker is a waterfront manual laborer who is involved in loading and unloading ships, trucks, trains or airplanes. After the shipping container revolution of the 1950s, the number of dockworkers required declined by over 90%, and the term "stevedore" has increasingly come to mean a stevedoring firm that contracts with a port, shipowner, or charterer to load and unload a vessel.[1][2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Loading and unloading ships 3 By country3.1 Australia 3.2 New Zealand 3.3 United Kingdom 3.4 United States4 In popular culture 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The word stevedore originated in Portugal
Portugal
or Spain, and entered the English language
English language
through its use by sailors
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Decca Records
Decca Records
Decca Records
is a British record label established in 1929 by Edward Lewis. Its U.S. label was established in late 1934 by Lewis, along with American Decca's first president Jack Kapp and later American Decca president Milton Rackmil. In 1937, anticipating Nazi aggression leading to World War II, Lewis sold American Decca and the link between the UK and U.S. Decca labels was broken for several decades.[1] The British label was renowned for its development of recording methods, while the American company developed the concept of cast albums in the musical genre. Both wings are now part of the Universal Music Group, which is owned by Vivendi, a media conglomerate headquartered in Paris, France
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Académie Charles Cros
The Académie Charles-Cros, ( Charles Cros
Charles Cros
Academy) is an organization located in Chézy-sur-Marne, France, that acts as an intermediary between government cultural policy makers and professionals in music and the recording industry. The academy is composed of fifty members specializing in music criticism, sound recording, and culture. It was founded in 1947 by Roger Vincent with Armand Panigel, José Bruyr, Antoine Goléa, Franck Ténot, and Pierre Brive – critics and recording specialists - and led by musicologist Marc Pincherle
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Silent Night
"Silent Night" (German: Stille Nacht, heilige Nacht) is a popular Christmas carol, composed in 1818 by Franz Xaver Gruber
Franz Xaver Gruber
to lyrics by Joseph Mohr
Joseph Mohr
in the small town of Oberndorf bei Salzburg, Austria. It was declared an intangible cultural heritage by UNESCO
UNESCO
in 2011.[1] The song has been recorded by a large number of singers from every music genre. The version sung by Bing Crosby
Bing Crosby
is the third best-selling single of all-time.Contents1 History 2 Translations 3 Lyrics 4 Musical settings 5 In film 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The song was first performed on Christmas Eve
Christmas Eve
1818 at St Nicholas parish church in Oberndorf, a village in the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
on the Salzach
Salzach
river in present-day Austria
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Norway
Indigenous status:Sami[3]Minority status:[4]Jewish Traveller Forest Finn Romani KvenReligion LutheranDemonym Norwegian (Nordmann)Government Unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy• MonarchHarald V• Prime MinisterErna Solberg• President of the StortingTone W. Trøen• Chief JusticeToril Marie ØieLegislature StortingHistory• State established prior unification872• Norwegian Empire (Greatest indep
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