HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Magnus Maximus
Magnus Maximus
Magnus Maximus
(Latin: Flavius Magnus Maximus
Magnus Maximus
Augustus, Welsh: Macsen Wledig) (c. 335—August 28, 388) was Western Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
from 383 to 388. In 383, as commander of Britain, he usurped the throne against emperor Gratian, and by negotiation with emperor Theodosius I, he was made emperor in Britannia and Gaul
Gaul
the next year while Gratian's brother Valentinian II
Valentinian II
retained Italy, Pannonia, Hispania, and Africa. In 387, Maximus's ambitions led him to invade Italy, resulting in his defeat by Theodosius I
Theodosius I
at the Battle of the Save
Battle of the Save
in 388
[...More...]

"Magnus Maximus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ossetians
14,385[5] Diaspora Turkey 50,000[6][7][8] Tajikistan 7,861[9] Uzbekistan 5,823[10] Ukraine 4,830[11] Kazakhstan 4,308[12] Turkmenistan 2,066[13] Azerbaijan 1,170[14] Kyrgyzstan 758[15] Syria 700[16] Belarus 554[17] Moldova 403[18] Armenia 331[19] Latvia 285[20] Lithuania 119[21] Estonia 116[22]LanguagesOssetian, Russian, GeorgianReligionPredominantly † Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Christianity with a sizeable minority professing Uatsdin
Uatsdin
and IslamRelated ethnic groupsScythians, Sarmatians, Alans Other Iranian peoples, the Jassic people
Jassic people
of Hungary, neighbouring peoples of the Caucasus.a
[...More...]

"Ossetians" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Theodosian Dynasty
The Theodosian dynasty was a Roman family that rose to eminence in the waning days of the Roman Empire.Contents1 History 2 Members 3 Stemmata 4 See alsoHistory[edit] Its founding father was Flavius Theodosius (often referred to as Count Theodosius), a great general who had saved Britannia from the Great Conspiracy. His son, Flavius Theodosius was made emperor of the Eastern Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 379, and briefly reunited the Roman Empire 394–395 by defeating the usurper Eugenius. Theodosius I
Theodosius I
was succeeded by his sons Honorius in the West and Arcadius
Arcadius
in the East. The House of Theodosius was related to the Valentinian Dynasty by marriage, since Theodosius I
Theodosius I
had married Galla, a daughter of Valentinian I. Their daughter was Galla Placidia
[...More...]

"Theodosian Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Africa Province
French Algeria
Algeria
(19th - 20th centuries)French conquest French governorsResistance PacificationEmir Abdelkader Fatma N'SoumerMokrani Revolt Cheikh BouamamaNationalism RCUA FLN GPRAAlgerian War 1958 putsch 1961 putschÉvian Accords Independence referendumPied-Noir Harkis Oujda GroupContemporary era 1960s–80sArab nationalism 1965 putschBerber Spring 1988 Riots1990s Algerian Civil War
[...More...]

"Africa Province" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pannonia
Pannonia
Pannonia
was an ancient province of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
bounded north and east by the Danube, coterminous westward with Noricum
Noricum
and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia
[...More...]

"Pannonia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Gaul
Roman Gaul
Gaul
refers to Gaul[1] under provincial rule in the Roman Empire from the 1st century BC to the 5th century AD. The Roman Republic
Roman Republic
began its takeover of Celtic Gaul
Gaul
in 121 BC, when it conquered and annexed the southern reaches of the area. Julius Caesar significantly advanced the task by defeating the Celtic tribes in the Gallic Wars
Gallic Wars
of 58-51 BC. In 22 BC, imperial administration of Gaul
Gaul
was reorganized, establishing the provinces of Gallia
Gallia
Aquitania, Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and Gallia
Gallia
Lugdunensis
[...More...]

"Roman Gaul" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Danube
The Danube
Danube
or Donau (/ˈdænjuːb/ DAN-yoob, known by various names in other languages) is Europe's second longest river, after the Volga. It is located in Central and Eastern Europe. The Danube
Danube
was once a long-standing frontier of the Roman Empire, and today flows through 10 countries, more than any other river in the world. Originating in Germany, the Danube
Danube
flows southeast for 2,860 km (1,780 mi), passing through or touching the border of Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, Moldova
Moldova
and Ukraine
Ukraine
before emptying into the Black Sea. Its drainage basin extends into nine more countries
[...More...]

"Danube" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Welsh Language
All UK speakers: 700,000+ (2012)[1]Wales: 562,016 speakers (19.0% of the population of Wales),[2] (data from 2011 Census); All skills (speaking, reading, or writing): 630,062 language users[3] England: 110,000–150,000 (estimated) Argentina: 1,500-5,000[4][5](data not from 2011 census) Canada: L1,<3,885,[6] United States: ~2,235 (2009-2013) (2017)Language familyIndo-EuropeanCelticInsular CelticBrittonicWesternWelshEarly formsCommon BrittonicOld WelshMiddle WelshWriting systemLatin (Welsh alphabet) Welsh BrailleOfficial statusOfficial language inWalesRecognised minority language in United Kingdom
[...More...]

"Welsh Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Leonid Dynasty
The House of Leo
House of Leo
ruled the Eastern Roman Empire
Eastern Roman Empire
from 457 to 518 (and varying parts of the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
from 474 to 480).[1] Julius Nepos
Julius Nepos
ruled a Roman rump state of Dalmatia
Dalmatia
after the fall of the Western Roman Empire.[1] List of Leonid rulers of the Byzantine Empire[edit] The emperors of the House of Leo
House of Leo
were:[2] Leo I the Thracian
Leo I the Thracian
(Valerius Leo) (401–474, ruled 457–474) – soldier Leo II (467–474, ruled 474) – grandson of Leo I, son of Zeno Zeno (425–491, ruled 474–475) – son-in-law of Leo I; orig. Tarasicodissa, an Isaurian Basiliscus
Basiliscus
( ? – c
[...More...]

"Leonid Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lyon
Centre: Parc de la Tête d'Or, Confluence district and the Vieux Lyon. Bottom: Pont Lafayette, Part-Dieu district with the Place Bellecour
Place Bellecour
in foreground during Festival of Lights.FlagCoat of armsMotto(s): Avant, avant, Lion le melhor. (Old Franco-Provençal: Forward, forward, Lyon
[...More...]

"Lyon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gaul
Gaul
Gaul
(Latin: Gallia) was a region of Western Europe
Western Europe
during the Iron Age that was inhabited by Celtic tribes, encompassing present day France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, Northern Italy, as well as the parts of the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Germany
Germany
on the west bank of the Rhine. It covered an area of 494,000 km2 (191,000 sq mi).[1] According to the testimony of Julius Caesar, Gaul
Gaul
was divided into three parts: Gallia Celtica, Belgica and Aquitania
[...More...]

"Gaul" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4,638-square-mile) Île-de-
[...More...]

"Paris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Picts
The Picts
Picts
was the name given to an unidentified tribal confederation of peoples who lived in what is today eastern and northern Scotland during the Late Iron Age
Iron Age
and Early Medieval periods. They are thought to have been ethnolinguistically Celtic. Where they lived and what their culture was like can be inferred from the geographical distribution of brochs, Brittonic place name elements, and Pictish stones. The name Picts
Picts
appears in written records from Late Antiquity to the 10th century, when they are thought to have merged with the Gaels
[...More...]

"Picts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gaels
The Gaels
Gaels
(Irish pronunciation: [ɡeːlˠ], Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [kɛː.əlˠ]; Irish: Na Gaeil, Scottish Gaelic: Na Gàidheil, Manx: Ny Gaeil) are an ethnolinguistic group native to northwestern Europe.[a] They are associated with the Gaelic languages: a branch of the Celtic languages
Celtic languages
comprising Irish, Manx and Scottish Gaelic. Historically, the ethnonyms Irish and Scots referred to the Gaels
Gaels
in general, but the scope of those nationalities is today more complex. Gaelic language
Gaelic language
and culture originated in Ireland, extending to Dál Riata in western Scotland. In antiquity the Gaels
Gaels
traded with the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and also raided Roman Britain. In the Middle Ages, Gaelic culture became dominant throughout the rest of Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man
[...More...]

"Gaels" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
[...More...]

"Christianity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.