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Magnum Research
Magnum Research
Magnum Research
Inc. (MRI) is an American privately held corporation based in Fridley, Minnesota
Fridley, Minnesota
which manufactures and distributes firearms
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Patent
A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a sovereign state or intergovernmental organization to an inventor or assignee for a limited period of time in exchange for detailed public disclosure of an invention. An invention is a solution to a specific technological problem and is a product or a process.[1]:17 Patents are a form of intellectual property. The procedure for granting patents, requirements placed on the patentee, and the extent of the exclusive rights vary widely between countries according to national laws and international agreements. Typically, however, a granted patent application must include one or more claims that define the invention. A patent may include many claims, each of which defines a specific property right. These claims must meet relevant patentability requirements, such as novelty, usefulness, and non-obviousness
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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John Taffin
John August Taffin (born May 2, 1939) is an American author from Boise, Idaho
Boise, Idaho
who writes several columns for gun magazines including Guns, Gun Digest, Sixgunner, Shoot! and American Handgunner. A former math teacher from 1964-1995, Taffin is regarded as an authority on single-action revolvers, handloading, handgun hunting, big-bore revolvers, and metallic silhouette shooting.[1] Taffin has authored five books and over 500 published articles. His monthly published gun columns include: Siluetas, Campfire Tales, The Sixgunner, and Taffin Tests. Taffin is widely regarded as an authority on revolvers, magnum cartridge load development, firearms rights and handguns in general.[2][3][4] In 2008 Taffin was instrumental in opening the Elmer Keith
Elmer Keith
Museum in Boise, Idaho
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.22 LR
The .22 Long Rifle
Rifle
(metric designation: 5.6×15mmR) cartridge is a long-established variety of .22 caliber rimfire ammunition, and in terms of units sold is still by far the most common ammunition in the world today. The cartridge is often referred to simply as .22 LR ("twenty-two-/ɛl/-/ɑːr/") and various rifles, pistols, revolvers, submachine guns and even some smoothbore shotguns (No. 1 bore) have been manufactured in this caliber.Contents1 History 2 Popularity in the US 3 Performance 4 Variants4.1 Subsonic 4.2 Standard velocity 4.3 High velocity 4.4 Hyper-velocity 4.5 Shot cartridges 4.6 Full metal jacket 4.7 Tracer5 Cartridge construction 6 Cartridge length 7 Usage 8 Cartridge dimensions 9 Muzzle velocity
Muzzle velocity
(nominal) 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] American firearms manufacturer J
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.40 S&W
The .40 S&W (10×22mm Smith & Wesson in unofficial metric notation) is a rimless pistol cartridge developed jointly by major American firearms manufacturers Smith & Wesson and Winchester.[3] The .40 S&W was developed from the ground up as a law enforcement cartridge designed to duplicate performance of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) reduced-velocity 10mm Auto
10mm Auto
cartridge which could be retrofitted into medium-frame (9mm size) semi-automatic handguns. It uses 0.40-inch (10 mm) diameter bullets ranging in weight from 105 to 200 grains (6.8 to 13.0 g).[4]<
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9mm
The 9×19mm Parabellum
9×19mm Parabellum
is a firearms cartridge that was designed by Georg Luger
Georg Luger
and introduced in 1902 by the German weapons manufacturer
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.45 ACP
The .45 ACP
.45 ACP
(Automatic Colt Pistol), or .45 Auto (11.43×23mm)[1] is a handgun cartridge designed by John Moses Browning in 1904, for use in his prototype Colt semi-automatic pistol. After successful military trials, it was adopted as the standard chambering for Colt's M1911 pistol, being named .45 ACP.[2]Contents1 Design and history 2 Cartridge dimensions 3 Performance 4 Magazine capacities 5 Adoption 6 Operating speeds 7 Load variants7.1 Plus P 7.2 Others8 Synonyms 9 Related rounds 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksDesign and history[edit] Cross-sectional diagram of U.S. Army .45 ACP
.45 ACP
"ball cartridge" for Model 1911 pistol, with dimensions in inches. During the late 1890s and early 20th century, the U.S
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M1911 Pistol
The M1911 is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operated pistol chambered for the .45 ACP
.45 ACP
cartridge.[1] It served as the standard-issue sidearm for the United States
United States
Armed Forces from 1911 to 1986. It was widely used in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam
Vietnam
War. The pistol's formal designation as of 1940 was Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911 for the original model of 1911 or Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911A1 for the M1911A1, adopted in 1924. The designation changed to Pistol, Caliber .45, Automatic, M1911A1 in the Vietnam War
Vietnam War
era.[1] The U.S. procured around 2.7 million M1911 and M1911A1 pistols in military contracts during its service life. The M1911 was replaced by the 9mm
9mm
Beretta M9
Beretta M9
pistol as the standard U.S
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.380 ACP
The .380 ACP
.380 ACP
(9×17mm) (Automatic Colt Pistol) is a rimless, straight-walled pistol cartridge developed by firearms designer John Moses Browning. The cartridge headspaces on the mouth of the case.[2] It was introduced in 1908 by Colt, for use in its new Colt Model 1908 pocket hammerless semi-automatic, and has been a popular self-defense cartridge ever since, seeing wide use in numerous handguns (typically smaller weapons). Other names for .380 ACP
.380 ACP
include .380 Auto, 9mm Browning, 9mm Corto, 9mm Kurz, 9mm Short, 9×17mm and 9 mm Browning Court (which is the C.I.P. designation)
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Titanium Nitride
Titanium
Titanium
nitride (TiN) (sometimes known as tinite) is an extremely hard ceramic material, often used as a coating on titanium alloys, steel, carbide, and aluminium components to improve the substrate's surface properties. Applied as a thin coating, TiN is used to harden and protect cutting and sliding surfaces, for decorative purposes (due to its golden appearance), and as a non-toxic exterior for medical implants
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SP-21 Barak
SP21 may refer to :SP-21 Barak, a pistol was developed by Israel Military Industries (IMI) in 2002 SP-21 (Brazil), a State highway in Brazil USS Zita (SP-21), a motorboat that the United States Navy assigned to service as a patrol vessel in 1917 during World War I a type of Vespel plastic made by DuPontThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the same title formed as a letter-number combination. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the inten
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Trademark
A trademark, trade mark, or trade-mark[1] is a recognizable sign, design, or expression which identifies products or services of a particular source from those of others,[2][3] although trademarks used to identify services are usually called service marks.[4][5] The trademark owner can be an individual, business organization, or any legal entity. A trademark may be located on a package, a label, a voucher, or on the product itself. For the sake of corporate identity, trademarks are often displayed on company buildings. The first legislative act concerning trademarks was passed by the Parliament of England
Parliament of England
in 1266 under the reign of Henry III, requiring all bakers to use a distinctive mark for the bread they sold. The first modern trademark laws emerged in the late 19th century. In France the first comprehensive trademark system in the world was passed into law in 1857
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Subsidiary
A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company[1][2][3] is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company.[4][5] The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints. In the United States
United States
railroad industry, an operating subsidiary is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock
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