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Magistrate
The term magistrate is used in a variety of systems of governments and laws to refer to a civilian officer who administers the law. In ancient Rome, a magistratus was one of the highest ranking government officers, and possessed both judicial and executive powers. In other parts of the world, such as China, a magistrate was responsible for administration over a particular geographic area. Today, in some jurisdictions, a magistrate is a judicial officer who hears cases in a lower court, and typically deals with more minor or preliminary matters
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Ex Officio Member
An ex officio member is a member of a body (a board, committee, council, etc.) who is part of it by virtue of holding another office. The term is Latin, meaning literally "from the office", and the sense intended is "by right of office"; its use dates back to the Roman Republic. According to Robert's Rules of Order, the term denotes only how one becomes a member of a body.[1] Participatory rights of ex officio members may or may not be limited by the body's regulations or bylaws. In some groups ex officio members may frequently abstain from voting. Unless regulations or bylaws constrain their rights, however, they are afforded the same rights as other members of the body, i.e., debating, proposing motions, voting, etc.[2]Contents1 For profit and nonprofit use 2 Governmental examples2.1 India2.1.1 Rajya Sabha 2.1.2 NITI Aayog2.2 Mainland China 2.3 Hong Kong 2.4 United Kingdom2.4.1 House of Lords 2.4.2 Supreme Courts of Scotland2.5 United
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Armed Forces
A military is a force authorized to use lethal or deadly force and weapons to support the interests of the state and some or all of its citizens. It typically consists of an Army, Navy, Air Force, and in certain countries the Marines
Marines
and Coast Guard. The task of the military is usually defined as defence of the state, and its citizens, and the prosecution of war against another state. The military may also have additional sanctioned and non-sanctioned functions within a society, including, the promotion of a political agenda, protecting corporate economic interests, internal population control, construction, emergency services, social ceremonies, and guarding important areas. The military may also function as a discrete subculture within a larger civil society, through the development of separate infrastructures, which may include housing, schools, utilities, logistics, health and medical, law, food production, finance and banking
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Head Of State
A head of state (or chief of state) is the public persona that officially represents the national unity and legitimacy of a sovereign state.[1] Depending on the country's form of government and separation of powers, the head of state may be a ceremonial figurehead or concurrently the head of government. In countries with parliamentary systems, the head of state is typically a ceremonial figurehead that does not actually guide day-to-day government activities or is not empowered to exercise any kind of secular political authority (e.g., Queen Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
of the Commonwealth Realms).[2] In countries where the head of state is also
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Districts Of Portugal
The Districts of Portugal
Portugal
(Portuguese: Distritos de Portugal), are the most important first-level administrative subdivisions of mainland Portugal
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President Of Portugal
The President of the Portuguese Republic (Portuguese: Presidente da República Portuguesa, pronounced [pɾɨziˈðẽtɨ ðɐ ʁɛˈpuβlikɐ puɾtuˈɡezɐ]) is the executive head of state of Portugal. The powers, functions and duties of prior presidential offices, and their relation with the Prime Minister and cabinets have over time differed with the various Portuguese constitutions. The current President of Portugal
Portugal
is Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa, who took office on 9 March 2016.Contents1 Role 2 Powers 3 Election 4 2016 presidential election 5 State visits 6 Living former Presidents 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksRole[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (February 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The Portuguese Third Republic is a semi-presidential system
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Civil Registry
Civil registration is the system by which a government records the vital events (births, marriages, and deaths) of its citizens and residents. The resulting repository or database has different names in different countries and even in different US states. It can be called a civil registry ,[1] civil register (but this is also an official term for an individual file of a vital event),[2] vital records, and other terms, and the office responsible for receiving the registrations can be called a bureau of vital statistics, registry of vital records and statistics,[3] registrar, registry, register, registry office (officially register office), or population registry. The primary purpose of civil registration is to create a legal document that can be used to establish and protect the rights of individuals. A secondary purpose is to create a data source for the compilation of vital statistics
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Traffic Warden
A parking enforcement officer (PEO),[1][2] traffic warden[1] (British English), parking inspector[3] (Australia and New Zealand), or civil enforcement officer[1] is a member of a traffic control department or agency who issues tickets for parking violations. The term parking attendant is sometimes considered a synonym[4] but sometimes used to refer to the different profession of parking lot attendant.[2] Even where parking meters are no longer used, the terms meter attendant and meter maid are still used colloquially or officially to refer to female and male PEOs.[5][2][6]Contents1 Other duties 2 By country2.1 Australia 2.2 Canada 2.3 Indonesia 2.4 Ireland 2.5 New Zealand 2.6 United Kingdom3 In popular culture 4 References 5 External linksOther duties[edit] On 9 December 2007, the mayor of Stockholm, Mikael Söderlund, announced that the tasks of the parking enforcement officers will be broadened to include fining graffiti vandals and litterers
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Head Of Government
A head of government (or chief of government) is a generic term used for either the highest or second highest official in the executive branch of a sovereign state, a federated state, or a self-governing colony, (commonly referred to as countries, nations or nation-states) who often presides over a cabinet, a group of ministers or secretaries who lead executive departments. The term "head of government" is often differentiated from the term "head of state", (e.g
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Public Works
Public works
Public works
(or internal improvements historically in the United States)[1][2][3] are a broad category of infrastructure projects, financed and constructed by the government, for recreational, employment, and health and safety uses in the greater community. They include public buildings (municipal buildings, schools, hospitals), transport infrastructure (roads, railroads, bridges, pipelines, canals, ports, airports), public spaces (public squares, parks, beaches), public services (water supply, sewage, electrical grid, dams), and other, usually long-term, physical assets and facilities. Though often interchangeable with public infrastructure and public capital, public works does not necessarily carry an economic component, thereby being a broader term. Public works
Public works
has been encouraged since antiquity
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Market (economics)
A market is one of the many varieties of systems, institutions, procedures, social relations and infrastructures whereby parties engage in exchange. While parties may exchange goods and services by barter, most markets rely on sellers offering their goods or services (including labor) in exchange for money from buyers. It can be said that a market is the process by which the prices of goods and services are established. Markets facilitate trade and enable the distribution and resource allocation in a society. Markets allow any trade-able item to be evaluated and priced. A market emerges more or less spontaneously or may be constructed deliberately by human interaction in order to enable the exchange of rights (cf. ownership) of services and goods
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Electronic Tagging
Electronic tagging
Electronic tagging
is a form of surveillance which uses an electronic device, fitted to the person. For example, an ankle monitor is used for people who have been sentenced to electronic monitoring by a court, or are required to wear a tag upon release from prison. It is also used in healthcare settings with people with dementia and in immigration contexts in some jurisdictions. If the device is based on GPS
GPS
technology, it is usually attached to a person by a probation officer, law enforcement or a private monitoring services company field officer, and is capable of tracking the wearer's location wherever there is the satellite signal to do so. Electronic monitoring tags can be also used in combination with curfews to confine defendants or offenders to their home as a condition of bail, as a stand-alone order or as a form of early release from prison
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Profession
A profession is a vocation founded upon specialized educational training, the purpose of which is to supply disinterested objective counsel and service to others, for a direct and definite compensation, wholly apart from expectation of other business gain.[1] The term is a truncation of the term "liberal profession", which is, in turn, an Anglicization of the French term "profession libérale"
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Jurist
A jurist (from medieval Latin) is someone who researches and studies jurisprudence (theory of law).[1] Such a person can work as an academic, legal writer or law lecturer. In the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and in many other Commonwealth countries, the word jurist sometimes refers to a barrister, whereas in the United States of America and Canada it often refers to a judge.[2] Thus a jurist, someone who studies, analyses and comments on law,[3] stands in contrast with a lawyer, someone who applies law on behalf of clients and thinks about it in practical terms.[4] There is a fundamental difference between the work of a lawyer and that of a jurist.[5] Many legal scholars and authors have explained that a person may be both a lawyer and a jurist, but a jurist is not necessarily a lawyer, nor a lawyer necessarily a jurist. Both must possess an acquaintance with the term "law"
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Supreme Court Of Canada
45°25'19.00"N 75°42'20.00"WComposition method Judicial appointments in CanadaAuthorized by Constitution Act, 1867
Constitution Act, 1867
and Supreme Court ActJudge term length Mandatory retirement at age 75No
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