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Magdalen College, Oxford
Magdalen College (/ˈmɔːdlɪn/ MAWD-lin)[2] is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford. Magdalen is one of the wealthiest colleges in Oxford, with an estimated financial endowment of £180.8 million as of 2014.[3] Magdalen stands next to the River Cherwell
River Cherwell
and has within its grounds a deer park and Addison's Walk
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Magdalen College (other)
Magdalen College
Magdalen College
is a constituent college of the University of Oxford. Magdalen College
Magdalen College
or Magdalene College may also refer to:Magdalene College, Cambridge, a constituent college of the University of Cambridge Northeast Catholic College, formerly known as Magdalen College, a Catholic liberal arts college in New Hampshire, United StatesSee also[edit] Magdalen College
Magdalen College
School (other) Magdalen Hall, Oxford, a former hall of the University of Oxford, originally sited next to the college of the same name, refounded as Hertford CollegeThis disambiguation page lists articles about schools, colleges, or other educational institutions which are associated with the same title
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Place Of Worship
A place of worship is a specially designed structure or consecrated space where individuals or a group of people such as a congregation come to perform acts of devotion, veneration, or religious study. A building constructed or used for this purpose is sometimes called a house of worship. Temples, churches, synagogues and mosques are examples of structures created for worship. A monastery, particularly for Buddhists, may serve both to house those belonging to religious orders and as a place of worship for visitors
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Fallow Deer
The fallow deer (Dama dama) is a ruminant mammal belonging to the family Cervidae. This common species is native to Europe, but has been introduced to Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, South Africa, Fernando Pó, São Tomé, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mayotte, Réunion, Seychelles, Comoro Islands, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Cyprus, Israel, Cape Verde, Lebanon, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the United States, the Falkland Islands, and Peru.[2][3] Some taxonomers include the rarer Persian fallow deer
Persian fallow deer
as a subspecies (D. d. mesopotamica),[4] while others treat it as an entirely different species (D
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Bowling Green
A bowling green is a finely-laid, close-mown and rolled stretch of turf for playing the game of bowls. Before 1830, when Edwin Beard Budding
Edwin Beard Budding
of Thrupp, near Stroud, invented the lawnmower, lawns were often kept cropped by grazing sheep on them. The world's oldest surviving bowling green is the Southampton Old Bowling Green, which was first used in 1299.[1] When the French adopted "boulingrin" in the 17th century, it was understood to mean a sunk geometrically shaped piece of perfect grass, framed in gravel walks, which often formed the centre of a regularly planted wood called a bosquet, somewhat like a highly formalized glade; it might have a central pool or fountain. The diarist Samuel Pepys
Samuel Pepys
relates a conversation he had with the architect Hugh May:"Then walked to Whitehall, where saw nobody almost, but walked up and down with Hugh May, who is a very ingenious man
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English Civil War
Parliamentarian victoryExecution of King Charles I Exile of Charles II Establishment of the republican Commonwealth under Oliver CromwellBelligerentsEnglish, Scottish, Welsh and Irish Royalists English, Scottish, Welsh and Irish ParliamentariansCommanders and leadersKing Charles I   Prince Rupert
Prince Rupert
of the Rhine Charles IIEarl of Essex Thomas Fairfax Oliver CromwellCasualties and losses50,000[1] 34,000[1]127,000 noncombat deaths (including some 40,000 civilians)[a]v t eEnglish Civil WarFirst Second ThirdThe English Civil War
English Civil War
(1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's government
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Dutch Elm Disease
Dutch elm disease
Dutch elm disease
(DED) is caused by a member of the sac fungi (Ascomycota) affecting elm trees, and is spread by elm bark beetles. Although believed to be originally native to Asia, the disease was accidentally introduced into America and Europe, where it has devastated native populations of elms that did not have resistance to the disease. It has also reached New Zealand
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University Parks
The Oxford
Oxford
University Parks, commonly referred to locally as the University Parks, the Uni Parks or just The Parks, is a large parkland area slightly northeast of the city centre in Oxford, England. The park is bounded to the east by the River Cherwell, though a small plot of land called Mesopotamia sits between the upper and lower levels of the river. To the north of the parks is Norham Gardens
Norham Gardens
and Lady Margaret Hall, to the west the Parks Road, Keble College and Somerville College, and the Science Area on South Parks Road
Parks Road
to the south. The park is open to the public during the day, and has gardens, large sports fields, and exotic plants
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Henry Fox Talbot
William Henry Fox Talbot
Henry Fox Talbot
(/ˈtɔːlbət, ˈtæl-/; 11 February 1800 – 17 September 1877) was a British scientist, inventor and photography pioneer who invented the salted paper and calotype processes, precursors to photographic processes of the later 19th and 20th centuries. His work in the 1840s on photomechanical reproduction led to the creation of the photoglyphic engraving process, the precursor to photogravure. He was the holder of a controversial patent which affected the early development of commercial photography in Britain. He was also a noted photographer who contributed to the development of photography as an artistic medium
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High Anglican
The term "high church" refers to beliefs and practices of ecclesiology, liturgy, and theology, generally with an emphasis on formality and resistance to "modernisation." Although used in connection with various Christian traditions, the term originated in and has been principally associated with the Anglican/Episcopal tradition, where it describes Anglican churches using a number of ritual practices associated in the popular mind with Roman Catholicism. The opposite is low church. Contemporary media discussing Anglican churches tend to prefer evangelical to "low church", and Anglo-Catholic to "high church", though the terms do not exactly correspond
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Winchester, England
Winchester is a city and the county town of Hampshire, England. The city lies at the heart of the wider City of Winchester, a local government district, and is located at the western end of the South Downs National Park, along the course of the River Itchen.[2] It is situated 61 miles (98 km) south-west of London and 13.6 miles (21.9 km) from Southampton, its closest city. At the time of the 2011 Census, Winchester had a population of 45,184. The wider City of Winchester district which includes towns such as Alresford and Bishop's Waltham has a population of 116,800. [3] Winchester developed from the Roman town of Venta Belgarum, which in turn developed from an Iron Age oppidum. Winchester's major landmark is Winchester Cathedral, one of the largest cathedrals in Europe, with the distinction of having the longest nave and overall length of all Gothic cathedrals in Europe
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Catholic Revival
The Counter-Reformation (Latin: Contrareformatio), also called the Catholic Reformation (Latin: Reformatio Catholica) or the Catholic Revival,[1] was the period of Catholic resurgence initiated in response to the Protestant Reformation, beginning with the Council of Trent (1545–1563) and ending at the close of the Thirty Years' War (1648)
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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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Evening Prayer (Anglican)
Evening Prayer
Prayer
is a liturgy in use in the Anglican tradition celebrated in the late afternoon or evening. It is also commonly known as Evensong, especially when the office is rendered chorally, that is, when most of the service is sung. It is roughly the equivalent of Vespers
Vespers
in the Roman Catholic Church and the Lutheran
Lutheran
churches, although it was originally formed by combining the monastic offices of Vespers
Vespers
and Compline
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Compline
Compline (/ˈkɒmplɪn/ KOM-plin), also known as Complin, Night Prayer, or the Prayers at the End of the Day, is the final church service (or office) of the day in the Christian
Christian
tradition of canonical hours. The English word Compline is derived from the Latin completorium, as Compline is the completion of the working day. The word was first used in this sense about the beginning of the 6th century by St. Benedict
St. Benedict
in his Rule (Regula Benedicti; hereafter, RB), in Chapters 16, 17, 18, and 42, and he even uses the verb complere to signify Compline: "Omnes ergo in unum positi compleant" ("All having assembled in one place, let them say Compline"); "et exeuntes a completorio" ("and, after going out from Compline")... (RB, Chap
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Benediction Of The Blessed Sacrament
Benediction
Benediction
of the Blessed Sacrament, more properly Benediction
Benediction
with the Blessed Sacrament, is a devotional ceremony, celebrated especially in the Roman Catholic Church, but also in some Anglican,
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