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Mae Sai District
Mae Sai (Thai: แม่สาย, pronounced [mɛ̂ː sǎːj]; Shan: မႄႈသၢႆ, pronounced [mɛ.sʰǎj]) is the northernmost district (amphoe) of Chiang Rai Province
Chiang Rai Province
in northern Thailand. The town of Mae Sai is a major border crossing between Thailand
Thailand
and Myanmar. Asian Highway Network
Asian Highway Network
AH2
AH2
( Thailand
Thailand
Route 1 or Phahonyothin Road) crosses the Mae Sai River
Mae Sai River
to the town Tachileik
Tachileik
in Myanmar. One-day passes for non-Burmese nationals crossing into Myanmar
Myanmar
are issued at Myanmar
Myanmar
customs in Tachileik. Passports are confiscated and a temporary travel permit is issued; the permit is exchanged for the traveler's passport upon crossing back into Thailand
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Amphoe
An amphoe (sometimes also amphur, Thai: อำเภอ, pronounced [ʔām.pʰɤ̄ː]) is the second level administrative subdivision of Thailand. Usually translated as "district". Amphoe make up the provinces, and are analogous to counties. The chief district officer is Nai Amphoe (นายอำเภอ). Amphoe are divided into tambons, or sub-districts. Altogether Thailand
Thailand
has 878 districts, not including the 50 districts of Bangkok
Bangkok
which are called khet (เขต) since the Bangkok administrative reform of 1972. The number of amphoe in provinces varies, from only three in the smallest provinces, up to the 50 urban districts of Bangkok. Also the sizes and population of amphoe differ greatly
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Thesaban Tambon
Thesaban
Thesaban
(Thai: เทศบาล, RTGS: thetsaban, pronounced [tʰêːt.sā.bāːn]) are the municipalities of Thailand. There are three levels of municipalities: city, town, and sub-district. Bangkok
Bangkok
and Pattaya
Pattaya
are special municipal entities not included in the thesaban system. The municipalities assume some of the responsibilities which are assigned to the districts (amphoe) or communes (tambon) for non-municipal (rural) areas
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Ruak River
The Ruak River
Ruak River
(Thai: แม่น้ำรวก, RTGS: Maenam Ruak, pronounced [mɛ̂ː.náːm rûa̯k]; Lanna: ) is a right hand tributary of the Mekong. The mouth of the Ruak river is at the Thai- Burma
Burma
border opposite Laos, a spot known as the "Golden Triangle", a popular tourist destination.Contents1 Course 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksCourse[edit] The Ruak originates within the hills of the Daen Lao Range, Shan State (Burma), and becomes the boundary river between Thailand
Thailand
and Burma
Burma
at the confluence with the Mae Sai River
Mae Sai River
near the northernmost point of Thailand.[1] It then meanders eastwards until it empties into the Mekong
Mekong
River at Ban Sop Ruak, Tambon Wiang, Chiang Saen District, Chiang Rai Province
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Daen Lao Range
The Daen Lao Range
Daen Lao Range
(Thai: ทิวเขาแดนลาว,[1] pronounced [tʰīw kʰǎw dɛ̄ːn lāːw]; Burmese: Loi La) is a mountain range of the Shan Hills
Shan Hills
in eastern Burma
Burma
and northern Thailand. Most of the range is in Shan State, with its northern limit close to the border with China, and runs southwards across the Thai border, at the northern end of Thailand. Geologically in the Daen Lao Range, as in the other southern subranges of the Shan Hills, layers of alluvium are superimposed on hard rock.[2]Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Protected areas3.1 Burma 3.2 Thailand4 Features 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] The range extends east of the Salween
Salween
until almost reaching the Golden Triangle area, separating the Salween
Salween
watershed from the Mekong watershed
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Doi Tung
Doi Tung
Doi Tung
(ดอยตุง) is a mountain in the Thai highlands
Thai highlands
of Chiang Rai Province, Thailand.Contents1 Location 2 Description 3 Economy 4 Doi Tung
Doi Tung
Royal Villa 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksLocation[edit] While not the highest elevation of the province, the 1,389 m high Doi Tung rises steeply, standing isolated close to the Thailand-Myanmar border. It is in the area known as "Golden Triangle". Description[edit]Wat Phra That Doi TungMost of the bedrock of the mountain is limestone and granite. The vegetation below 1,000 m is mostly deciduous forest, and the vegetation above this height is evergreen.[1] The population of Doi Tung
Doi Tung
is about 11,000 people, consisting of various tribes including Akha, Lahu, Tai Lue, and Lawa.[2] Wat Phra That Doi Tung
Doi Tung
is on top of the hill
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Chiang Rai Province
Chiang Rai
Chiang Rai
(Thai: เชียงราย, pronounced [t͡ɕʰīaŋ.rāːj]; Lanna: ᨩ᩠ᨿᨦᩁᩣ᩠ᨿ, pronounced [tɕiaŋ.haːj] is the northernmost province of Thailand
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King Amphoe
An amphoe (sometimes also amphur, Thai: อำเภอ, pronounced [ʔām.pʰɤ̄ː]) is the second level administrative subdivision of Thailand. Usually translated as "district". Amphoe make up the provinces, and are analogous to counties. The chief district officer is Nai Amphoe (นายอำเภอ). Amphoe are divided into tambons, or sub-districts. Altogether Thailand
Thailand
has 878 districts, not including the 50 districts of Bangkok
Bangkok
which are called khet (เขต) since the Bangkok administrative reform of 1972. The number of amphoe in provinces varies, from only three in the smallest provinces, up to the 50 urban districts of Bangkok. Also the sizes and population of amphoe differ greatly
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Tambon
Tambon
Tambon
(Thai: ตำบล, pronounced [tām.bōn]) is a local governmental unit in Thailand. Below district (amphoe) and province (changwat), they form the third administrative subdivision level. As of 2009 there were 7,255 tambon,[1] not including the 180 khwaeng of Bangkok, which are set at the same administrative level, thus every district contains eight to ten tambon. Tambon
Tambon
is usually translated as "township" or "subdistrict" in English — the latter is the recommended translation,[2] though also often used for king amphoe, the designation for a subdistrict acting as a branch (Thai: king) of the parent district. Tambon
Tambon
are further subdivided into 69,307 villages (muban), about ten per tambon
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Muban
Muban (Thai: หมู่บ้าน) is the lowest administrative sub-division of Thailand. Usually translated as village and sometimes as hamlet, they are a subdivision of a tambon. As of 2008, there were 74,944 administrative muban in Thailand.[1] As of the 1990 census, the average village consisted of 144 households or 746 persons.Contents1 Nomenclature 2 Administration 3 Other meanings 4 ReferencesNomenclature[edit] Muban may function as one word, in the sense of a hamlet or village, and as such may be shortened to Ban
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Population
In biology, a population is all the organisms of the same group or species, which live in a particular geographical area, and have the capability of interbreeding.[1][2] The area of a sexual population is the area where inter-breeding is potentially possible between any pair within the area, and where the probability of interbreeding is greater than the probability of cross-breeding with individuals from other areas.[3] In sociology, population refers to a collection of humans. Demography is a social science which entails the statistical study of human populations
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Amphoe Mae Chan
Mae Chan (Thai: แม่จัน, pronounced [mɛ̂ː t͡ɕān]) is a district (amphoe) in the northern part of Chiang Rai Province, northern Thailand.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Administration3.1 Central administration 3.2 Local administration4 References 5 External linksGeography[edit]Rice planting, Mae Chan DistrictNeighboring districts are (from the north clockwise) Mae Sai, Chiang Saen, Doi Luang, Mueang Chiang Rai
Chiang Rai
and Mae Fa Luang of Chiang Rai Province. Doi Nang Non, the "Mountain of the Sleeping Lady", is part of the Daen Lao Range and is one of the main geographic features of Mae Chan District. History[edit] The district was created as the successor of Mueang Chiang Saen
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Amphoe Mueang Chiang Rai
Mueang Chiang Rai
Chiang Rai
(Thai: เมืองเชียงราย, pronounced [mɯ̄a̯ŋ t͡ɕʰīa̯ŋ rāːj]; Lanna: , pronounced [mɯaŋ.tɕiaŋ.haaj]) is the capital district (amphoe mueang) of Chiang Rai
Chiang Rai
Province, northern Thailand.Rai Mae Fah Luang Art and Cultural Park, Tambon
Tambon
Rop Wiang, Amphoe Mueang Chiang RaiContents1 Geography 2 Administration 3 References 4 External linksGeography[edit] Neighboring districts are (from the northwest clockwise) Mae Fa Luang, Mae Chan, Wiang Chiang Rung, Wiang Chai, Thoeng, Pa Daet, Phan, Mae Lao, Mae Suai of Chiang Rai Province
Chiang Rai Province
and Mae Ai of Chiang Mai Province. The Phi Pan Nam Mountains
Phi Pan Nam Mountains
dominate the landscape of the southern side of the district
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Amphoe Khun Tan
Khun Tan (Thai: ขุนตาล; IPA: [kʰǔn tāːn]) is a district (amphoe) of Chiang Rai
Chiang Rai
Province, northern Thailand.Contents1 History 2 Etymology 3 Geography 4 Administration 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The government separated three tambon of Thoeng District to create the minor district (king amphoe) Khun Ta on 1 April 1992.[1] It was upgraded to a full district on 5 December 1996.[2] Etymology[edit] The name Khun Tan comes from Khun Tan River, which forms the backbone of in Tambon
Tambon
Pa Tan
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Amphoe Mae Lao
Mae Lao (Thai: แม่ลาว, pronounced [mɛ̂ː lāːw]) is a district (amphoe) in the central part of Chiang Rai
Chiang Rai
Province, northern Thailand.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Administration 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The area of Mae Lao district was separated from Mueang Chiang Rai district and established a minor district (king amphoe) on 31 May 1993
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Amphoe Mae Suai
Mae Suai (Thai: แม่สรวย; IPA: [mɛ̂ː sǔaj]) is a district (amphoe) in the western part of Chiang Rai
Chiang Rai
Province, northern Thailand.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Administration 4 References 5 External linksGeography[edit]Western edge of the Khun Tan Range, Mae Suai DistrictNeighboring districts are (from the northeast clockwise) Mueang Chiang Rai, Mae Lao, Phan, Wiang Pa Pao, Phrao, Chai Prakan, Fang, and Mae Ai of Chiang Mai Province. The Khun Tan Range
Khun Tan Range
stretches from north to south along the west side of the district
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