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Machine-readable Data
Machine-readable data is data (or metadata) in a format that can be easily processed by a computer. There are two types: human-readable data that is marked up so that it can also be read by machines (e.g. microformats, RDFa, HTML) or data file formats intended principally for processing by machines (RDF, XML, JSON). However, Extensible Markup Language (XML) is designed to be both human- and machine-readable, and Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) is used to improve presentation of the data for human readability. For example, XSLT
XSLT
can be used to automatically render XML
XML
in PDF. Machine-readable data can be automatically transformed for human-readability but, generally speaking, the reverse is not true. Machine readable is not synonymous with digitally accessible
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Data
Data
Data
(/ˈdeɪtə/ DAY-tə, /ˈdætə/ DAT-ə, /ˈdɑːtə/ DAH-tə)[1] is a set of values of qualitative or quantitative variables. Data
Data
and information are often used interchangeably; however, the extent to which a set of data is informative to someone depends on the extent to which it is unexpected by that person
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Metadata
Metadata
Metadata
is "data [information] that provides information about other data".[1] Three distinct types of metadata exist: descriptive metadata, structural metadata, and administrative metadata.[2]Descriptive metadata describes a resource for purposes such as discovery and identification. It can include elements such as title, abstract, author, and keywords. Structural metadata is metadata about containers of data and indicates how compound objects are put together, for example, how pages are ordered to form chapters. It describes the types, versions, relationships and other characteristics of digital materials
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Linked Data
In computing, linked data (often capitalized as Linked Data) is a method of publishing structured data so that it can be interlinked and become more useful through semantic queries
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Open Data
Open data
Open data
is the idea that some data should be freely available to everyone to use and republish as they wish, without restrictions from copyright, patents or other mechanisms of control.[1] The goals of the open data movement are similar to those of other "open" movements such as open source, open hardware, open content, open government, open access, and open science
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Office Of Management And Budget
The Office of Management and Budget
Office of Management and Budget
(OMB) is the largest office within the Executive Office of the President of the United States
Executive Office of the President of the United States
(EOP). OMB's most prominent function is to produce the President's Budget,[2] but OMB also measures the quality of agency programs, policies, and procedures to see if they comply with the president's policies and coordinates inter-agency policy initiatives. The current OMB Director is Mick Mulvaney. The OMB Director reports to the President, Vice President and the White House Chief of Staff.Contents1 History 2 Purpose 3 Structure3.1 Overview 3.2 Organization4 Key staff 5 List of directors 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Government Performance And Results Act
The Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) (Pub.L. 103–62) is a United States
United States
law enacted in 1993,[1] one of a series of laws designed to improve government performance management. The GPRA requires agencies to engage in performance management tasks such as setting goals, measuring results, and reporting their progress. In order to comply with the GPRA, agencies produce strategic plans, performance plans, and conduct gap analyses of projects
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PDF
The Portable Document
Document
Format (PDF) is a file format developed in the 1990s to present documents, including text formatting and images, in a manner independent of application software, hardware, and operating systems.[3][4] Based on the PostScript
PostScript
language, each PDF file encapsulates a complete description of a fixed-layout flat document, including the text, fonts, vector graphics, raster images and other information needed to display it
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XSLT
XSLT
XSLT
( Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations) is a language for transforming XML
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JSON
In computing, JavaScript
JavaScript
Object Notation or JSON
JSON
(/ˈdʒeɪsən/ JAY-sən)[1] is an open-standard file format that uses human-readable text to transmit data objects consisting of attribute–value pairs and array data types (or any other serializable value). It is a very common data format used for asynchronous browser–server communication, including as a replacement for XML
XML
in some AJAX-style systems.[2] JSON
JSON
is a language-independent data format. It was derived from JavaScript, but as of 2017[update] many programming languages include code to generate and parse JSON-format data. The official Internet media type for JSON
JSON
is application/json
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HTML
Hypertext
Hypertext
Markup Language (HTML) is the standard markup language for creating web pages and web applications. With Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and JavaScript, it forms a triad of cornerstone technologies for the World Wide Web.[4] Web browsers receive HTML
HTML
documents from a web server or from local storage and render the documents into multimedia web pages. HTML
HTML
describes the structure of a web page semantically and originally included cues for the appearance of the document. HTML
HTML
elements are the building blocks of HTML
HTML
pages. With HTML constructs, images and other objects such as interactive forms may be embedded into the rendered page. HTML
HTML
provides a means to create structured documents by denoting structural semantics for text such as headings, paragraphs, lists, links, quotes and other items
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RDFa
RDFa
RDFa
(or Resource Description Framework
Resource Description Framework
in Attributes[1]) is a W3C Recommendation that adds a set of attribute-level extensions to HTML, X HTML
HTML
and various XML-based document types for embedding rich metadata within Web documents. The RDF data-model mapping enables its use for embedding RDF subject-predicate-object expressions within XHTML documents
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Markup Language
In computer text processing, a markup language is a system for annotating a document in a way that is syntactically distinguishable from the text.[1] The idea and terminology evolved from the "marking up" of paper manuscripts, i.e., the revision instructions by editors, traditionally written with a blue pencil on authors' manuscripts.[citation needed] In digital media, this "blue pencil instruction text" was replaced by tags, that is, instructions are expressed directly by tags or "instruction text encapsulated by tags." Examples include typesetting instructions such as those found in troff, TeX
TeX
and LaTeX, or structural markers such as XML
XML
tags
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Computer
A computer is a device that can be instructed to carry out sequences of arithmetic or logical operations automatically. Modern computers have the ability to follow generalized sets of operations, called programs. These programs enable computers to perform an extremely wide range of tasks. Computers are used as control systems for a wide variety of industrial and consumer devices. This includes simple special purpose devices like microwave ovens and remote controls, factory devices such as industrial robots and computer assisted design, and also general purpose devices like personal computers and mobile devices such as smartphones. Early computers were only conceived as calculating devices. Since ancient times, simple manual devices like the abacus aided people in doing calculations. Early in the Industrial Revolution, some mechanical devices were built to automate long tedious tasks, such as guiding patterns for looms
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