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Macbeth
Macbeth
Macbeth
(/məkˈbɛθ/; full title The Tragedy of Macbeth) is a tragedy by William Shakespeare; it is thought to have been first performed in 1606.[a] It dramatises the damaging physical and psychological effects of political ambition on those who seek power for its own sake. Of all the plays that Shakespeare
Shakespeare
wrote during the reign of James I, who was patron of Shakespeare's acting company, Macbeth
Macbeth
most clearly reflects the playwright's relationship with his sovereign.[1] It was first published in the Folio of 1623, possibly from a prompt book, and is Shakespeare's shortest tragedy.[2] A brave Scottish general named Macbeth
Macbeth
receives a prophecy from a trio of witches that one day he will become King of Scotland
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Caesarean Section
Caesarean section, also known as C-section or caesarean delivery, is the use of surgery to deliver one or more babies.[2] A caesarean section is often necessary when a vaginal delivery would put the baby or mother at risk.[2] This may include obstructed labour, twin pregnancy, high blood pressure in the mother, breech birth, or problems with the placenta or umbilical cord.[2][3] A caesarean delivery may be performed based upon the shape of the mother's pelvis or history of a previous C-section.[2][3] A trial of vaginal birth after C-section may be possible.[2] The World Health Organization recommends that Caesarean section
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Northumberland
Northumberland
Northumberland
(/nɔːrˈθʌmbərlənd/;[2] abbreviated Northd) is a county in North East England. The northernmost county of England, it borders Cumbria
Cumbria
to the west, County Durham
County Durham
and Tyne and Wear
Tyne and Wear
to the south and the Scottish Borders
Scottish Borders
to the north
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Banquet
A banquet (/ˈbæŋk.wɪt/; French: [bɑ̃.kɛ]) is a large meal or feast,[1] complete with main courses and desserts, often served with ad libitum alcoholic beverages[citation needed], such as wine or beer. A banquet usually serves a purpose such as a charitable gathering, a ceremony, or a celebration, and is often preceded or followed by speeches in honor of someone. In the majority of banquets, the gathering is seated at round tables with around 8-10 people per table.Contents1 Historic context 2 Contemporary times 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistoric context[edit] Overall, there is an archaeological debate of when feasting began. Archaeologist Brian Hayden argues that feasts were an important event because the surplus of food that resulted in feasts turned into social and political ties and a competition in order to display one's own wealth. During these feasts, luxury foods were offered to their guest[2]
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Ross
Ross
Ross
(Ros in Scottish Gaelic) is a region of Scotland
Scotland
and a former earldom and county. The name Ross
Ross
allegedly derives from a Gaelic word meaning "headland", perhaps a reference to the Black Isle. Another possible origin is the West Norse
West Norse
word for Orkney – Hrossey – meaning horse island; the area once belonged to the Norwegian (West Norse) earldom of Orkney
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Playing Company
In Renaissance
Renaissance
London, playing company was the usual term for a company of actors. These companies were organized around a group of ten or so shareholders (or "sharers"), who performed in the plays but were also responsible for management.[1] The sharers employed "hired men" – that is, the minor actors and the workers behind the scenes. The major companies were based at specific theatres in London; the most successful of them, William Shakespeare's company the King's Men, had the open-air Globe Theatre
Globe Theatre
for summer seasons and the enclosed Blackfriars Theatre
Blackfriars Theatre
in the winters
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Fife
Fife
Fife
([ˈfəif]; Scottish Gaelic: Fìobha) is a council area and historic county of Scotland. It is situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with inland boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. By custom it is widely held to have been one of the major Pictish kingdoms, known as Fib, and is still commonly known as the Kingdom of Fife
Fife
within Scotland. Fife
Fife
is one of the six local authorities part of the Edinburgh
Edinburgh
and South East Scotland
Scotland
city region. It is a lieutenancy area, and was a county of Scotland
Scotland
until 1975. It was very occasionally known by the anglicisation Fifeshire in old documents and maps compiled by English cartographers and authors
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Prompt Book
The prompt book, also called transcript, the bible or sometimes simply "the book," is the copy of a production script that contains the information necessary to create a theatrical production from the ground up. It is a compilation of all blocking, business, light, speech and sound cues, lists of properties, drawings of the set, contact information for the cast and crew, and any other relevant information that might be necessary to help the production run smoothly and nicely.[citation needed] In modern theatrical productions, the prompt book is generally maintained and kept by the stage manager, with differences in the specific construction and organization to suit the style of the stage manager keeping the book, and the type of production (legitimate theatre, musical theatre, dance, opera, etc.).Contents1 Description and use 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 BibliographyDescription and use[edit]This section does not cite any sources
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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Soliloquy
A soliloquy (from Latin solo "to oneself" + loquor "I talk") is a device often used in drama when a character speaks to himself or herself, relating thoughts and feelings, thereby also sharing them with the audience, giving off the illusion of being a series of unspoken reflections.[1] If other characters are present, they keep silent[2] and/or are disregarded by the speaker.[3] The term soliloquy is distinct from a monologue or an aside: a monologue is a speech where one character addresses other characters; an aside is a (usually short) comment by one character towards the audience, though during the play it may seem like the character is addressing him or herself. Soliloquies were frequently used in dramas but went out of fashion when drama shifted towards realism in the late 18th century. Good examples in literature can be seen in the character of
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Henry Garnet
Henry Garnet
Henry Garnet
(July 1555 – 3 May 1606), sometimes Henry Garnett, was an English Jesuit
Jesuit
priest executed for his complicity in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605. Born in Heanor, Derbyshire, he was educated in Nottingham
Nottingham
and later at Winchester College
Winchester College
before he moved to London in 1571 to work for a publisher. There he professed an interest in legal studies and in 1575, he travelled to the continent and joined the Society of Jesus. He was ordained in Rome some time around 1582. In 1586, Garnet returned to England as part of the Jesuit
Jesuit
mission, soon succeeding Father William Weston as Jesuit
Jesuit
superior, following the latter's capture by the English authorities
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Birnam, Perth And Kinross
Dunkeld and Birnam are two adjacent towns in Perth and Kinross, Scotland. They lie on opposite banks of the River Tay, and were first linked by a bridge built in 1809 by Thomas Telford.[1] Dunkeld and Birnam share a railway station, (Dunkeld & Birnam) on the Highland Main Line. Dunkeld (Scots: Dunkell,[2] from Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Chailleann, "fort of the Caledonians")[3] is about 15 miles (24 km) north of Perth on the eastern side of what is now the A9 road into the Scottish Highlands.[4] Birnam lies on the opposite bank of the River Tay. On the western side of the A9 is The Hermitage, a National Trust for Scotland site
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Ghosts In European Culture
In folklore, a ghost (sometimes known as an apparition, haunt, phantom, poltergeist, shade, specter or spectre, spirit, spook, and wraith) is the soul or spirit of a dead person or animal that can appear to the living. In ghostlore, descriptions of ghosts vary widely from an invisible presence to translucent or barely visible wispy shapes, to realistic, lifelike visions. The deliberate attempt to contact the spirit of a deceased person is known as necromancy, or in spiritism as a séance. The belief in the existence of an afterlife, as well as manifestations of the spirits of the dead is widespread, dating back to animism or ancestor worship in pre-literate cultures. Certain religious practices—funeral rites, exorcisms, and some practices of spiritualism and ritual magic—are specifically designed to rest the spirits of the dead
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Cawdor
Cawdor
Cawdor
(Scottish Gaelic: Caladar) is a village and parish in the Highland council area, Scotland. The village is situated 5 miles south south west of Nairn, and 12 miles from Inverness. The village is in the Historic County of Nairnshire.Contents1 History1.1 Roman fort2 Local community 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The village is the location of Cawdor
Cawdor
Castle, the seat of the Earl Cawdor. Macbeth, in Shakespeare's play of the same name, becomes Thane of Cawdor
Cawdor
early in the narrative. However, since the oldest part of the structure dates from the 14th century, and has no predecessor [1], Shakespeare's version (and the tradition which came before it) is of extremely dubious historical authenticity. The name "Cawdor" is the English pronunciation and spelling of the ancient and original name Calder
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Jacobean Era
The Jacobean era
Jacobean era
refers to the period in English and Scottish history that coincides with the reign of James VI of Scotland
Scotland
(1567–1625), who also inherited the crown of
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Thane (Scotland)
Thane was the title given to a local royal official in medieval eastern Scotland, equivalent in rank to the son of an earl,[1] who was at the head of an administrative and socio-economic unit known as a thanedom. The thane was introduced in the reign of David I, an Anglophile, to replace the gaelic tòiseach ( meaning leader, and with which the term Taoiseach shares an origin). In Scotland at that time toshach designated a deputy to a mormaer, controlling a particular portion of a mormaerdom on the mormaer's behalf. The English thegn was a more general term, simply referring to a powerful noble below the rank of Ealdorman (a term which had now evolved into Earl); having introduced Earl to describe mormaers, David used thane to describe toshachs. Functionally, the Thane was a territorial administrator, acting under a territorial Earl (the latter resembling a Saxon Ealdorman rather than the more superficial Norman Earl), or royal steward
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