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Macalester College
Coordinates: 44°56′21.07″N 93°10′4.70″W / 44.9391861°N 93.1679722°W / 44.9391861; -93.1679722 Macalester College (/məˈkæləstər/) is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States. Founded in 1874, Macalester is exclusively an undergraduate four-year institution and enrolled 2,146 students in the fall of 2017 from 50 U.S. states and 93 countries.[3] It is currently a Forbes
Forbes
Top 100 College, and a Forbes
Forbes
Top 50 School for International Students. In 2018, U.S
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Internationalism (politics)
Internationalism is a political principle which transcends nationalism and advocates a greater political or economic cooperation among nations and people.[1] Supporters of this principle are referred to as internationalists, and generally believe that the people of the world should unite across national, political, cultural, racial, or class boundaries to advance their common interests, or that the governments of the world should cooperate because their mutual long-term interests are of greater importance than their short-term disputes.Contents1 Origins 2 Socialism2.1 The International Workingmen's Association 2.2 The Socialist
Socialist
International 2.3 The Communist International 2.4 The Fourth International3 Modern expression3.1 International organizations and internationalism 3.2 Sovereign nations vs
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Leadership In Energy And Environmental Design
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
(LEED) is one of the most popular green building certification programs used worldwide.[7] Developed by the non-profit U.S. Green Building Council
U.S

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College And University Rankings
College and university rankings
College and university rankings
are rankings of institutions in higher education which have been ranked on the basis of various combinations of various factors. Rankings have most often been conducted by magazines, newspapers, websites, governments, or academics. In addition to ranking entire institutions, organizations perform rankings of specific programs, departments, and schools. Various rankings consider combinations of measures of funding and endowment, research excellence and/or influence, specialization expertise, admissions, student options, award numbers, internationalization, graduate employment, industrial linkage, historical reputation and other criteria. Various rankings mostly evaluating on institutional output by research. Some rankings evaluate institutions within a single country, while others assess institutions worldwide
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Forbes Magazine's List Of America's Best Colleges
In 2008, Forbes.com began publishing an annual list, prepared by the Center for College Affordability and Productivity[1] of "America's Best Colleges".[2] Student satisfaction (evaluations from RateMyProfessors.com, retention rates and targeted student satisfaction surveys on Facebook) constitutes 75% of the score. Post-graduate success (self-reported salaries of alumni from PayScale, alumni appearing on the CCAP's America's Leaders List) constitutes 32.5% of the score. Student debt loads constitute 25% of the score. The graduation rate (the proportion of students who complete four-year degrees in four years) constitutes 7.5% of the score. Academic success (the proportion of students receiving nationally competitive awards) constitutes 10% of the score. Public reputation is not considered, which causes some colleges to score lower than in other lists
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Liberal Arts College
A liberal arts college is a college with an emphasis on undergraduate study in the liberal arts and sciences. A liberal arts college aims to impart a broad general knowledge and develop general intellectual capacities, in contrast to a professional, vocational, or technical curriculum.[1] Students in a liberal arts college generally major in a particular discipline while receiving exposure to a wide range of academic subjects, including sciences as well as the traditional humanities subjects taught as liberal arts
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Forbes
Forbes
Forbes
(/fɔːrbz/) is an American business magazine. Published bi-weekly, it features original articles on finance, industry, investing, and marketing topics. Forbes
Forbes
also reports on related subjects such as technology, communications, science, politics, and law. Its headquarters is located in Jersey City, New Jersey. Primary competitors in the national business magazine category include Fortune and Bloomberg Businessweek. The magazine is well known for its lists and rankings, including of the richest Americans (the Forbes
Forbes
400), of the world's top companies (the Forbes
Forbes
Global 2000), and The World's Billionaires. The motto of Forbes
Forbes
magazine is "The Capitalist Tool". Its chair and editor-in-chief is Steve Forbes, and its CEO is Mike Perlis
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The Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is an American business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal, along with its Asian and European editions, is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp. The newspaper is published in the broadsheet format and online. The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to News Corp, in their June 2017 10-K Filing with the SEC, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.277 million copies (including nearly 1,270,000 digital subscriptions) as of June 2017[update],[2] compared with USA Today's 1.7 million. The newspaper has won 40 Pulitzer Prizes through 2017[3] and derives its name from Wall Street
Wall Street
in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Ivy League
The Ivy League
Ivy League
is a collegiate athletic conference comprising sports teams from eight private universities in the Northeastern United States. The conference name is also commonly used to refer to those eight schools as a group beyond the sports context.[2] The eight members are Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard
Harvard
University, the University
University
of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, and Yale
Yale
University
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The Huffington Post
HuffPost
HuffPost
(formerly The Huffington Post and sometimes abbreviated HuffPo)[2] is a liberal[3] American news and opinion website and blog that has both localized and international editions
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Multiculturalism
Multiculturalism
Multiculturalism
is a term with a range of meanings in the contexts of sociology, political philosophy, and in colloquial use. In sociology and everyday usage, it is a synonym for "ethnic pluralism" with the two terms often used interchangeably, for example a cultural pluralism in which various ethnic groups collaborate and enter into a dialogue with one another without having to sacrifice their particular identities. It can describe a mixed ethnic community area where multiple cultural traditions exist, or a single country within which they do. Groups associated with an aboriginal ethnic group and foreigner ethnic groups are often the focus. In reference to sociology, multiculturalism is the end state of either a natural or artificial process (e.g. legally controlled immigration) and occurs on either a large national scale or a smaller scale within a nation's communities
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Lila Bell Wallace
Lila Bell Wallace (December 25, 1889 – May 8, 1984) was an American magazine publisher and philanthropist.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Marriage and career2.1 Philanthropy3 Legacy and honors 4 Death 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Born as Lila Bell Acheson in Virden, Manitoba, Canada, her father was a Presbyterian minister who brought his family to the USA when she was a child, and she grew up in the Midwest. In 1917, she graduated from the University of Oregon, located in Eugene, Oregon, taught at schools for two years, and then worked for the Young Women's Christian Association
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Civic Engagement
Civic engagement or civic participation, according to the American Psychological Association, is "individual and collective actions designed to identify and address issues of public concern".[1] It can be defined as citizens working together to make a change or difference in the community. Civic engagement includes communities working together in both political and non-political actions
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Washington University In St. Louis
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis
(also referred to as WashU, or WUSTL) is a private research university located in the St. Louis metropolitan area and in Missouri, United States. Founded in 1853, and named after George Washington, the university has students and faculty from all 50 U.S. states and more than 120 countries.[6] As of 2017, 24 Nobel laureates have been affiliated with Washington University, nine having done the major part of their pioneering research at the university.[7] Washington University's undergraduate program is ranked 18th by U.S
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