HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ma Laichi
Ma Laichi
Ma Laichi
(1681? – 1766?[1]), (simplified Chinese: 马来迟; traditional Chinese: 馬來遲; pinyin: Mǎ Láichí; Wade–Giles: Ma Lai-chih) also known as Abu 'l-Futūh Ma Laichi, was a Chinese Sufi master, who brought the Khufiyya
Khufiyya
movement to China and created the Huasi menhuan ( Sufi
Sufi
order) - the earliest and most important Naqshbandi
Naqshbandi
(نقشبندية,納克什班迪) order in Chinese Muslim history.[2][3]Ma Laichi's mausoleum (Hua Si Gongbei) in Linxia City.Contents1 Life1.1 Afaq Khoja's blessing 1.2 The great Hajj 1.3 The Khufiyya2 Death 3 Literature 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Afaq Khoja's blessing[edit] Ma Laichi
Ma Laichi
came from a Chinese Muslim family with a military background
[...More...]

"Ma Laichi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chinese Name
Chinese personal names are names used by those from mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora
Chinese diaspora
overseas. Due to China's historical dominance of East Asian culture, many names used in Korea and Vietnam are adaptations of Chinese names, or have historical roots in Chinese, with appropriate adaptation to accommodate linguistic differences. Modern Chinese names consist of a surname known as xing (姓, xìng), which comes first and is usually but not always monosyllabic, followed by a personal name called ming (名, míng), which is nearly always mono- or disyllabic
[...More...]

"Chinese Name" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Xiao'erjing
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
32 c. BCE Hieratic
Hieratic
32 c. BCEDemotic 7 c. BCEMeroitic 3 c. BCEProto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCEUgaritic 15 c. BCE Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCEGe’ez 5–6 c. BCEPhoenician 12 c. BCEPaleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCESamaritan 6 c. BCE Libyco-Berber
Libyco-Berber
3 c. BCETifinaghPaleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE Aramaic 8 c. BCE Kharoṣṭhī
Kharoṣṭhī
4 c. BCE Brāhmī 4 c. BCE Brahmic family
Brahmic family
(see)E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE Devanagari 13 c. CECanadian syllabics 1840Hebrew 3 c. BCE Pahlavi 3 c. BCEAvestan 4 c. CEPalmyrene 2 c. BCE Syriac 2 c. BCENabataean 2 c. BCEArabic 4 c. CEN'Ko 1949 CESogdian 2 c. BCEOrkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CEOld Hungarian c. 650 CEOld UyghurMongolian 1204 CEMandaic 2 c. CEGreek 8 c. BCEEtruscan 8 c. BCELatin 7 c
[...More...]

"Xiao'erjing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chinese Surname
Chinese surnames are used by Han Chinese
Han Chinese
and Sinicized ethnic groups in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, Brunei, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam
Vietnam
and among overseas Chinese communities. In ancient times two types of surnames existed, namely xing (Chinese: 姓; pinyin: xìng) or clan names, and shi (Chinese: 氏; pinyin: shì) or lineage names. Chinese family names are patrilineal, passed from father to children (in adoption, the adoptee usually also takes the same surname). Women do not normally change their surnames upon marriage, except in places with more Western influences such as Hong Kong. Traditionally Chinese surnames have been exogamous.[1][2] The colloquial expressions laobaixing (老百姓; lit. "old hundred surnames") and bǎixìng (百姓, lit
[...More...]

"Chinese Surname" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Xinjiang Cuisine
Xinjiang
Xinjiang
cuisine (Chinese: 新疆菜; pinyin: Xīnjiāng Cài) reflects the cooking styles of many ethnic groups of the Xinjiang region, and refers particularly to Uyghur cuisine (Uyghur: ئۇيغۇر تائاملىرى, Уйғур Таамлири‎, ULY: Uyghur Taamliri; Chinese: 维吾尔菜; pinyin: Wéiwú'ěr Cài). Signature ingredients include roasted mutton, kebabs, roasted fish, and rice.[1] Because of the Muslim population, the food is predominantly halal. Xinjiang
Xinjiang
cuisine is found throughout much of China, as migrants from the region often open Xinjiang
Xinjiang
restaurants or food stands in other regions
[...More...]

"Xinjiang Cuisine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hui Liangyu
Hui Liangyu
Hui Liangyu
(Chinese: 回良玉; pinyin: Huí Liángyù, Xiao'erjing: ﺧُﻮِ ﻟِﯿْﺎ ﻳُﻮْْ‎ ; born October 1944) was a Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China
Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China
in charge of agriculture. Biography[edit] Hui was born in Yushu, Jilin
Yushu, Jilin
Province. He is a member of the Hui ethnic minority. Starting in 1969, he worked in a number of Communist Party and government positions, rising to full membership in the Politburo of the CPC Central Committee
CPC Central Committee
in November 2002. He was the CPC party chief
CPC party chief
in Jiangsu
Jiangsu
from 2000 to 2002
[...More...]

"Hui Liangyu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Islam In China (1911–present)
Islam
Islam
(/ˈɪslɑːm/)[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion teaching that there is only one God
God
(Allah)[1] and that Muhammad
Muhammad
is the messenger of God.[2][3] It is the world's second-largest religion[4] and the fastest-growing major religion in the world,[5][6][7] with over 1.8 billion followers or 24.1% of the global population,[8] known as Muslims.[9] Muslims make up a majority of the population in 50 countries.[4] Islam
Islam
teaches that God
God
is merciful, all-powerful, unique[10] and has guided mankind through prophets, revealed scriptures and natural signs.[3][11] The primary scriptures of Islam
Islam
are the Quran, viewed by Muslims as the verbatim word of God, and the teachings and normative example (called the sunnah, composed of accounts called hadith) of Muhammad
Muhammad
(c
[...More...]

"Islam In China (1911–present)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Afaqi Khoja Revolts
During the early and mid-19th century in China, the Afaqi Khojas in the Khanate of Kokand
Khanate of Kokand
(descended from Khoja Burhanuddin and ultimately from Afaq Khoja) unsuccessfully tried to invade Kashgar
Kashgar
and regain Altishahr
Altishahr
from the Qing
Qing
dynasty.Contents1 History 2 The khojas 3 Legacy 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyHistory[edit] See also: Dzungar conquest of Altishahr Hui merchants fought for the Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
in 1826 against Turkic Muslim rebels led by the Jahangir Khoja. The Muslim Khojas and Khanate of Kokand were resisted by the Qing
Qing
army and Dungan merchants
[...More...]

"Afaqi Khoja Revolts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Uyghur Arabic Alphabet
U+0600 to U+06FF U+0750 to U+077F U+FB50 to U+FDFF U+FE70 to U+FEFFThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
[...More...]

"Uyghur Arabic Alphabet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Great Mosque Of Xi'an
The Great Mosque
Mosque
of Xi'an
Xi'an
(Chinese: 西安大清真寺; pinyin: Xīān Dà Qīngzhēnsì) is the largest mosque in China.[1]:128 An active place of worship within Xi'an
Xi'an
Muslim Quarter, this courtyard complex is also a popular tourist site. The majority of the mosque was built during the early Ming dynasty.[2]:121 It now houses more than twenty buildings in its five courtyards, and covers 12,000 square meters.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Architecture 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The mosque is also known as the Huajue Mosque
Mosque
(Chinese: 化觉巷清真寺; pinyin: Huàjué Xiàng Qīngzhēnsì), for its location on 30 Huajue Lane
[...More...]

"Great Mosque Of Xi'an" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Islam During The Tang Dynasty
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
[...More...]

"Islam During The Tang Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dynasties In Chinese History
The following is a chronology of the dynasties in Chinese History.Contents1 Background 2 Dynasties of China 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksBackground[edit] As one might incorrectly infer from viewing historical timelines, it is not usually the case that one dynasty transitions abruptly and smoothly into another. Rather, dynasties were often established before the complete overthrow of an existing reign, or continued for a time after they had been defeated. For example, the conventional date 1645 marks the year in which the Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
armies overthrew the preceding Ming dynasty, according to the dynastic cycle of China. However, the Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
was established in 1636 (or even 1616, albeit under a different name), while the last Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
pretender was not deposed until 1663
[...More...]

"Dynasties In Chinese History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Islam In Macau
Islam
Islam
in Macau
Macau
is a minority religion in the region
[...More...]

"Islam In Macau" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Yusuf Ma Dexin
Yusuf Ma Dexin
Ma Dexin
(also Ma Tesing; 1794–1874) was a Hui Chinese
Hui Chinese
scholar of Islam
Islam
from Yunnan, known for his fluency and proficiency in both Arabic
Arabic
and Persian, and for his knowledge of Islam.[1] He also went by the Chinese name Ma Fuchu
[...More...]

"Yusuf Ma Dexin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Xunhua Salar Autonomous County
Xunhua
Xunhua
Salar Autonomous County (Chinese: 循化撒拉族自治县; pinyin: Xúnhuà Sǎlázú Zìzhìxiàn; Salar: Göxdeñiz Velayat Yisır Salır Özbaşdak Yurt) is an autonomous Salar county in the southeast of Haidong Prefecture
Haidong Prefecture
of Qinghai
Qinghai
Province, China. The county has an area of around 2,100 square kilometres (810 sq mi) and approximately 110,000 inhabitants (2002)
[...More...]

"Xunhua Salar Autonomous County" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wang Daiyu
Wáng Dàiyú (simplified Chinese: 王岱舆; traditional Chinese: 王岱輿; pinyin: Wáng Dàiyú; Wade–Giles: Wang Tai-yü, Xiao'erjing: ٔوْا دَﻰْ ﻳُﻮْ‎) (ca. 1570 - ca. 1660) was a Chinese Muslim (Hui) scholar of Arab
Arab
descent[1]. His given name was Ya, style name Daiyu
[...More...]

"Wang Daiyu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.