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M62 Motorway
J6 → M57 motorwayJ10 → M6 motorway / J12 → M60 motorway/M602 motorway / J18 → M60 motorway/M66 motorwayJ20 → A627(M) motorwayJ26 → M606 motorwayJ27 → M621 motorwayJ29 → M1 motorwayJ32a → A1(M) motorwayJ35 → M18 motorwayEast end North CaveLocationCounties Merseyside, Cheshire, Greater Manchester, West Yorkshire, North Yorkshire, East Riding of YorkshirePrimary destinations Liverpool Huyton Warrington Manchester Oldham Rochdale Huddersfield Halifax Leeds Pontefract GooleRoad networkRoads in the United KingdomMotorways A and B road zonesThe M62 is a 107-mile-long (172 km) west–east trans-Pennine motorway in Northern England, connecting Liverpool
Liverpool
and Hull via Manchester
Manchester
and Leeds; 7 miles (11 km) of the route is shared with the M60 orbital motorway around Manchester
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Gridlock
Gridlock
Gridlock
is a type of traffic jam where "continuous queues of vehicles block an entire network of intersecting streets, bringing traffic in all directions to a complete standstill".[1] The term originates from a situation possible in a grid plan where intersections are blocked, preventing vehicles from either moving forwards through the intersection or backing up to an upstream intersection. The term gridlock is also incorrectly used to describe high traffic congestion with minimal flow (which is simply a traffic jam), where a blocked grid system is not involved
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Saint Petersburg
Saint
Saint
Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, tr. Sankt-Peterburg, IPA: [ˈsankt pʲɪtʲɪrˈburk] ( listen)) is Russia's second-largest city after Moscow, with five million inhabitants in 2012.[9] An important Russian port on the Baltic Sea, it has a status of a federal subject (a federal city). Situated on the Neva
Neva
River, at the head of the Gulf of Finland
Gulf of Finland
on the Baltic Sea, it was founded by Tsar
Tsar
Peter the Great
Peter the Great
on May 27 [O.S. 16] 1703
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Primary Status
The United Kingdom has a network of roads, of varied quality and capacity, totalling about 262,300 miles (422,100 km). Road distances are shown in miles or yards and UK speed limits are indicated in miles per hour (mph) or by the use of the national speed limit (NSL) symbol. Some vehicle categories have various lower maximum limits enforced by speed limiters. Enforcement of UK road speed limits increasingly uses speed guns, automated in-vehicle systems and automated roadside traffic cameras. A unified numbering system is in place for Great Britain, whilst in Northern Ireland, there is no available explanation for the allocation of road numbers.[1] The earliest specifically engineered roads were built during the British Iron Age. The road network was expanded during the Roman occupation. Some of these survive and others were lost. New roads were added in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and from the 17th century onwards
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West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
Yorkshire
is a metropolitan county in England. It is an inland and in relative terms upland county having eastward-draining valleys while taking in moors of the Pennines
Pennines
and has a population of 2.2 million
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List Of Roads Zones In Great Britain
A roads are numbered routes in Great Britain. See the article Great Britain road numbering scheme for the rationale behind the numbers allocated. Depending on the first digit of the road's number see:Zone 1 (road beginning with 1) Zone 2 (road beginning with 2) Zone 3 (road beginning with 3) Zone 4 (road beginning with 4) Zone 5 (road beginning with 5) Zone 6 (road beginning with 6) Zone 7 (road beginning with 7) Zone 8 (road beginning with 8) Zone 9 (road beginning with 9)B roads[edit] B roads are numbered routes in Great Britain
Great Britain
of lesser importance than A roads
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Merseyside
Merseyside (/ˈmɜːrzisaɪd/ MUR-zee-syde) is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1.38 million.[1] It encompasses the metropolitan area centred on both banks of the lower reaches of the Mersey Estuary, and comprises five metropolitan boroughs: Knowsley, St Helens, Sefton, Wirral, and the city of Liverpool. Merseyside, which was created on 1 April 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972, takes its name from the River Mersey. Merseyside spans 249 square miles (645 km2) of land which border Lancashire (to the north-east), Greater Manchester (to the east), Cheshire (to the south and south-east) and the Irish Sea to the west. North Wales is across the Dee Estuary. There is a mix of high density urban areas, suburbs, semi-rural and rural locations in Merseyside, but overwhelmingly the land use is urban
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North Cave
North Cave
North Cave
is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated 15 miles (24 km) to the west of Hull city centre on the B1230 road. South Cave
South Cave
is approximately 2 miles (3 km) to the south-east. The civil parish is formed by the village of North Cave
North Cave
and the hamlet of Everthorpe. The 2011 UK census states that North Cave
North Cave
parish had a population of 1,667,[1] a reduction on the 2001 UK census figure of 1,943.[2] North Cave
North Cave
lies within the Parliamentary constituency of Haltemprice and Howden
Howden
an area that mainly consists of middle class suburbs, towns and villages
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Shannon, County Clare
Shannon (Irish: Sionainn) or Shannon Town (Baile na Sionnainne), named after the river near which it stands, is a town in County Clare, Ireland. It was given town status on 1 January 1982. The town is located just off the N19 road, a spur of the N18/M18 road between Limerick
Limerick
and Ennis. It is the location of Shannon Airport, an international airport serving the Clare/ Limerick
Limerick
region in the west of Ireland.Contents1 History 2 Recent developments 3 Education 4 Economy 5 Local government and politics 6 Climate 7 Twin towns – sister cities 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Shannon is a new town
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International E-road Network
The international E-road network is a numbering system for roads in Europe developed by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE). The network is numbered from E 1 up and its roads cross national borders. It also reaches Central Asian countries like Kyrgyzstan, since they are members of the UNECE. European main international traffic arteries are defined by ECE/TRANS/SC.1/2016/3/Rev.1 which consider three types of roads: motorways, express roads, and ordinary roads. In most countries, roads carry the European route designation beside national road numbers. Other countries like Belgium, Norway
Norway
and Sweden have roads with exclusive European route signage (Examples: E 18 and E 6), while at the other end of the scale, British road signs do not show the routes at all
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Holyhead
Holyhead
Holyhead
(/ˈhɒlɪhɛd/ ( listen) HOL-i-hed; Welsh: Caergybi [kɑːɨrˈɡəbi], "Cybi's fort") is a town in Wales
Wales
and a major Irish Sea
Irish Sea
port serving Ireland. It is also a community and the largest town in the Isle of Anglesey
Isle of Anglesey
county, with a population of 13,659 at the 2011 census.[1] Holyhead
Holyhead
is on Holy Island, which is separated from Anglesey
Anglesey
by a very narrow channel and was originally connected to Anglesey
Anglesey
via the Four Mile Bridge
Four Mile Bridge
and now by the Stanley Embankment. In the mid-19th century, Lord Stanley, a local philanthropist, funded the building of a larger causeway,[citation needed] known locally as "The Cobb", it now carries the A5 and the railway line
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Ishim, Tyumen Oblast
Ishim (Russian: Иши́м) is a town in the south of Tyumen
Tyumen
Oblast, Russia. Population: 65,243 (2010 Census);[3] 67,757 (2002 Census);[6] 66,373 (1989 Census).[7]Contents1 History 2 Administrative and municipal status 3 Transport 4 Climate 5 Notable people 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 Sources7 External linksHistory[edit] It was founded in 1670 as the village of Korkina Sloboda.[8] In 1721, by the order of Tsar Peter the Great
Peter the Great
the village gained the right to establish Nikolskaya Trade Fair which rapidly became one of the most important trade fairs in Siberia. This trade fair took place twice a year on the Saint Nicholas
Saint Nicholas
day[when?] until 1919. In 1782, by the order of Empress Catherine the Great, Korkina Sloboda
Sloboda
was renamed Ishim and was granted town status.[8] In 1918, Ishim became the administrative center of Ishimsky Uyezd
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Stretford
Stretford
Stretford
(pop. 46,910) is a town in Trafford, Greater Manchester, England. Lying on flat ground between the River Mersey
River Mersey
and the Manchester
Manchester
Ship Canal, it is 3.8 miles (6.1 km) to the southwest of Manchester
Manchester
city centre, 3.0 miles (4.8 km) south-southwest of Salford and 4.2 miles (6.8 km) northeast of Altrincham. Stretford is contiguous with the suburb of Chorlton-cum-Hardy
Chorlton-cum-Hardy
to the east, and the towns of Urmston
Urmston
to the west, Salford to the north, and Sale to the south
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Roads In The United Kingdom
The United Kingdom has a network of roads, of varied quality and capacity, totalling about 262,300 miles (422,100 km). Road distances are shown in miles or yards and UK speed limits are indicated in miles per hour (mph) or by the use of the national speed limit (NSL) symbol. Some vehicle categories have various lower maximum limits enforced by speed limiters. Enforcement of UK road speed limits increasingly uses speed guns, automated in-vehicle systems and automated roadside traffic cameras. A unified numbering system is in place for Great Britain, whilst in Northern Ireland, there is no available explanation for the allocation of road numbers.[1] The earliest specifically engineered roads were built during the British Iron Age. The road network was expanded during the Roman occupation. Some of these survive and others were lost. New roads were added in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and from the 17th century onwards
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Concurrency (road)
A concurrency in a road network is an instance of one physical road bearing two or more different highway, motorway, or other route numbers.[1] When two freeways share the same right-of-way, it is sometimes called a common section or commons.[2] Other terminology for a concurrency includes overlap,[3] coincidence,[4] duplex (two concurrent routes), triplex (three concurrent routes), multiplex (any number of concurrent routes),[5] dual routing or triple routing.[6][7] Concurrent numbering can become very common in countries that allow it. Where multiple routes must pass between a single mountain crossing or over a bridge, or through a major city, it is often economically and practically advantageous for them all to be accommodated on a single physical road
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