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M6 Motorway
The M6 motorway
M6 motorway
runs from junction 19 of the M1 at the Catthorpe Interchange, near Rugby via Birmingham
Birmingham
then heads north, passing Stoke-on-Trent, Liverpool, Manchester, Preston, Lancaster, Carlisle and terminating at the Gretna junction (J45). Here, just short of the Scottish border it becomes the A74(M) which continues to Glasgow
Glasgow
as the M74. As of 2016, the M6, as well as combining with the length of the A14 from Brampton from junction with A1(M), the A74(M) and M74 to the junction with the M8 in Glasgow, forms the longest non-stop motorway in the United Kingdom and one of the busiest. It incorporated the Preston By-pass, the first length of motorway opened in the UK and forms part of a motorway "Backbone of Britain", running north−south between London
London
and Glasgow
Glasgow
via the industrial North of England
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West Midlands (county)
The West Midlands is a metropolitan county and city region in western central England with a 2014 estimated population of 2,808,356,[2] making it the second most populous county in England. It came into existence as a metropolitan county in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972, formed from parts of Staffordshire, Worcestershire and Warwickshire. The county itself is a NUTS 2 region within the wider NUTS 1 region of the same name
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Merseyside
Merseyside (/ˈmɜːrzisaɪd/ MUR-zee-syde) is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1.38 million.[1] It encompasses the metropolitan area centred on both banks of the lower reaches of the Mersey Estuary, and comprises five metropolitan boroughs: Knowsley, St Helens, Sefton, Wirral, and the city of Liverpool. Merseyside, which was created on 1 April 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972, takes its name from the River Mersey. Merseyside spans 249 square miles (645 km2) of land which border Lancashire (to the north-east), Greater Manchester (to the east), Cheshire (to the south and south-east) and the Irish Sea to the west. North Wales is across the Dee Estuary. There is a mix of high density urban areas, suburbs, semi-rural and rural locations in Merseyside, but overwhelmingly the land use is urban
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Greater Manchester
Greater Manchester
Manchester
is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 2.8 million.[2] It encompasses one of the largest metropolitan areas in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and comprises ten metropolitan boroughs: Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan, and the cities of Manchester
Manchester
and Salford. Greater Manchester
Manchester
was created on 1 April 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972; and designated a City Region on 1 April 2011. Greater Manchester
Manchester
spans 493 square miles (1,277 km2),[3] which roughly covers the territory of the Greater Manchester
Manchester
Built-up Area, the second most populous urban area in the UK
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Catthorpe
Catthorpe
Catthorpe
is a village and civil parish in the Harborough
Harborough
district of Leicestershire, England. It is located beside the River Avon and close to the A5 road, and hence close to the tripoint formed by Leicestershire, Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
and Warwickshire; the nearest town is Rugby, around 4 miles (6.4 km) to the southwest. According to the 2001 Census, the parish had a population of 179, falling slightly to 173 at the 2011 census.[1] Catthorpe
Catthorpe
gives its name to the nearby Catthorpe Interchange road junction formed by the M1 and M6 motorways and the A14 road, which is known to be regularly congested owing to its non-standard design. The A14 passes under both motorways; these underpasses were built in the 1960s for the former A427, which passed through Catthorpe
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Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Staffordshire
(/ˈstæfərdʃɪər/ or /ˈstæfərdʃər/;[2] abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands of England. It adjoins Cheshire
Cheshire
to the north west, Derbyshire
Derbyshire
and Leicestershire
Leicestershire
to the east, Warwickshire
Warwickshire
to the south east, West Midlands and Worcestershire
Worcestershire
to the south, and Shropshire
Shropshire
to the west. Stone railway station
Stone railway station
in Stone.The largest city in Staffordshire
Staffordshire
is Stoke-on-Trent, which is administered separately from the rest of the county as an independent unitary authority. Lichfield
Lichfield
also has city status, although this is a considerably smaller cathedral city
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Leicestershire
Leicestershire (/ˈlɛstərʃər, -ʃɪər/ ( listen); abbreviation Leics.) is a landlocked county in the English Midlands. The county borders Nottinghamshire to the north, Lincolnshire to the north-east, Rutland to the east, Northamptonshire to the south-east, Warwickshire to the south-west, Staffordshire to the west, and Derbyshire to the north-west. The border with most of Warwickshire is Watling Street (the A5). Leicestershire takes its name from the city of Leicester (unitary authority) located at its centre and administered separately from the rest of the county. The ceremonial county (non-metropolitan county plus the city of Leicester) has a total population of just over 1 million (2016 estimate), more than half of which (c
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European Route E24
The European route E 24 is part of the United Nations international E-road network. It runs for 254 km (158 mi) from Birmingham
Birmingham
to Ipswich. Route[edit] The route of the E 24 begins at the E 05 near Birmingham, where the M6 Toll
M6 Toll
merges with the M6 and the E 5 switches from the M6 Toll
M6 Toll
to the M42
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Wigan
Wigan
Wigan
(/ˈwɪɡən/ WIG-ən) is a town in Greater Manchester, England, on the River Douglas, 7.9 miles (13 km) south-west of Bolton, 10 miles (16 km) north of Warrington
Warrington
and 16 miles (25.7 km) west-northwest of Manchester. Wigan
Wigan
is the largest settlement in the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan and is its administrative centre. The town has a population of 103,608, whilst the wider borough has a population of 318,100.[1] Historically in Lancashire, Wigan
Wigan
during classical antiquity was in the territory of the Brigantes, an ancient Celtic tribe
Celtic tribe
that ruled much of what is now northern England
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Warrington
Warrington
Warrington
is a large town and unitary authority area in Cheshire, England, on the banks of the River Mersey, 20 miles (32 km) east of Liverpool, and 20 miles (32 km) west of Manchester. The population in 2016 was estimated at 208,800,[2] more than double that of 1968 when it became a New Town. Warrington
Warrington
is the largest town in the county of Cheshire. Warrington
Warrington
was founded by the Romans at an important crossing place on the River Mersey. A new settlement was established by the Saxons. By the Middle Ages, Warrington
Warrington
had emerged as a market town at the lowest bridging point of the river
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Crewe, Cheshire
Crewe /kruː/ is a railway town and civil parish within the borough of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The area has a population of 84,863. Crewe is perhaps best known as a large railway junction and home to Crewe Works, for many years a major railway engineering facility for manufacturing and overhauling locomotives, but now much reduced in size. From 1946 until 2002 it was also the home of Rolls-Royce motor car production. The Pyms Lane factory on the west of the town now produces Bentley motor cars exclusively
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Cannock
Cannock
Cannock
(/ˈkænək/), as of the 2011 census, has a population of 29,018[1], and is the most populous of the three towns in the district of Cannock Chase
Cannock Chase
in the central southern part of the county of Staffordshire
Staffordshire
in the West Midlands region
West Midlands region
of England. Cannock
Cannock
lies to the north of the West Midlands conurbation
West Midlands conurbation
on the M6, A34 and A5 roads, and to the south of Cannock
Cannock
Chase, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Cannock
Cannock
is served by a railway station on the Chase Line
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Gretna, Scotland
Gretna (Scottish Gaelic: Greatna) is a town in Dumfries
Dumfries
and Galloway, Scotland. Because they are near the Anglo-Scottish border, nearby Gretna Green, and to a lesser extent Gretna, are traditionally associated with eloping English couples because of the more liberal marriage provisions in Scots law
Scots law
compared to English law
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Rugby, Warwickshire
Rugby is a market town in Warwickshire, England, close to the River Avon. The town has a population of 70,628 (2011 census[1]) making it the second largest town in the county
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Primary Status
The United Kingdom has a network of roads, of varied quality and capacity, totalling about 262,300 miles (422,100 km). Road distances are shown in miles or yards and UK speed limits are indicated in miles per hour (mph) or by the use of the national speed limit (NSL) symbol. Some vehicle categories have various lower maximum limits enforced by speed limiters. Enforcement of UK road speed limits increasingly uses speed guns, automated in-vehicle systems and automated roadside traffic cameras. A unified numbering system is in place for Great Britain, whilst in Northern Ireland, there is no available explanation for the allocation of road numbers.[1] The earliest specifically engineered roads were built during the British Iron Age. The road network was expanded during the Roman occupation. Some of these survive and others were lost. New roads were added in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and from the 17th century onwards
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Lancashire
Lancashire
Lancashire
(/ˈlæŋkəʃər/ LANG-kə-shər, /-ʃɪər/ -sheer or, locally, [ˈɫaŋkɪʃə(ɻ)];[2] abbreviated Lancs.) is a county in north west England. The county town is Lancaster although the administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire
Lancashire
are known as Lancastrians. The history of Lancashire
Lancashire
begins with its founding in the 12th century. In the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086, some of its lands were treated as part of Yorkshire. The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire
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