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M6 Toll
The M6 Toll, also called the Birmingham
Birmingham
North Relief Road (BNRR), connects M6 Junction 3a at the Coleshill Interchange to M6 Junction 11A at Wolverhampton
Wolverhampton
with 27 miles (43 km) of six-lane motorway. The M6 Toll
M6 Toll
is the only major toll road in Great Britain, and has two payment plazas, Great Wyrley
Great Wyrley
Toll Plaza for northbound and Weeford Toll Plaza for southbound. The northbound toll plaza is situated between junctions T6 and T7, and the southbound between junctions T4 and T3. The weekday cash cost is £5.90 for a car and £11.00 for an HGV.[1] The M6 Toll
M6 Toll
is part of the (unsigned in the UK) E-road E05 and is subject to the same regulations and policing as other motorways in the UK
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Public Private Partnership
A public–private partnership (PPP, 3P or P3) is a cooperative arrangement between two or more public and private sectors, typically of a long-term nature.[1][2] Governments have used such a mix of public and private endeavors throughout history.[3][4] However, the late 20th century and early 21st century[when?] have seen a clear trend towards governments across the globe making greater use of various PPP arrangements.[1][2] There is no consensus about how to define a PPP.[5] PPPs can be understood of both as a governance mechanism and a language game.[1] When understood as a language game, or brand, the PPP phrase can cover hundreds of different types of long term contracts with a wide range of risk allocations, funding arrangements and transparency requirements
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AA Motoring Trust
IAM RoadSmart formerly called the Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM) is a charity based in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and serving nine countries, whose objective is to improve car driving and motorcycle riding standards, and so enhance road safety, by using the British police's system of car and motorcycle control commonly known as "the System". The System was devised in 1937 by racing driver Mark Everard Pepys, 6th Earl of Cottenham, to reduce accidents in police pursuits.[1] People who have passed an IAM test have substantially fewer accidents[2] and typically report getting more pleasure from driving too. Research has shown that IAM training increases a wide range of driving skills,[3] including speed, safe distances, gear changing and cornering. The IAM was formed in 1956 and has more than 90,000 members, all of whom have taken and passed an advanced test in a car, commercial vehicle or on a motorcycle
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Mills & Boon
Mills & Boon is a romance imprint of British publisher Harlequin UK Ltd. It was founded in 1908 by Gerald Rusgrove Mills
Gerald Rusgrove Mills
and Charles Boon as a general publisher. The company moved towards escapist fiction for women in the 1930s. In 1971, the publisher was bought by the Canadian company Harlequin Enterprises, its North American distributor based in Toronto, with whom it had a long informal partnership.[1] The two companies offer a number of imprints that between them account for almost three-quarters of the romance paperbacks published in Britain
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Sutton Coldfield
Sutton
Sutton
commonly refers to Sutton, London. Sutton, a place name meaning 'south settlement' or 'south town' in Old English, may also refer to:Contents1 Places1.1 United Kingdom 1.2 Australia 1.3 Canada 1.4 Ireland 1.5 New Zealand 1.6 United States2 People 3 Sport 4 Other usesPlaces[edit] United Kingdom[edit]EnglandIn alphabetical order by county:Sutton, Bedfordshire Sutton
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Royal Institute Of Chartered Surveyors
The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors
Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors
(RICS) is a professional body that accredits professionals within the land, property, construction, and infrastructure sectors worldwide. Professionals holding RICS qualifications may use the following designations after their name: MRICS (Member), FRICS (Fellow), AssocRICS (Associate)
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Knutsford
Knutsford
Knutsford
(/ˈnʌtsfərd/) is a town in Cheshire, England, 14 miles (23 km) south-west of Manchester
Manchester
and 9 miles (14 km) north-west of Macclesfield. The population of the town at the 2011 Census was 13,191.[1]Contents1 Present situation 2 History 3 Governance 4 Transport4.1 Road 4.2 Rail 4.3 Bus 4.4 Airport5 Economy 6 Religion 7 Education 8 Sport 9 Culture and community 10 See also 11 References11.1 Notes 11.2 Bibliography12 Further reading 13 External linksPresent situation[edit] Located near Cheshire's Golden Triangle and on the Cheshire
Cheshire
Plain between the Peak District
Peak District
to the east and the Welsh mountains to the west, Knutsford
Knutsford
and its surrounding villages are affluent and sought-after residential areas, with properties rated as some of the most expensive outside of London
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Manchester
Coordinates: 53°28′46″N 2°14′43″W / 53.47944°N 2.24528°W / 53.47944; -2.24528Manchester City
City
and Metropolitan boroughClockwise from top: Skyline of Manchester
Manchester

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Credit Card
A credit card is a payment card issued to users (cardholders) to enable the cardholder to pay a merchant for goods and services based on the cardholder's promise to the card issuer to pay them for the amounts so paid plus the other agreed charges.[1] The card issuer (usually a bank) creates a revolving account and grants a line of credit to the cardholder, from which the cardholder can borrow money for payment to a merchant or as a cash advance. In other words, credit cards combine payment services with extensions of credit.[2] Complex fee structures in the credit card industry may limit customers' ability to comparison shop, help ensure that the industry is not price-competitive and help maximize industry profits
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Black Country
The Black Country
Black Country
is a region of the West Midlands in England, west of Birmingham,[2] and commonly refers to all or part of the four Metropolitan Boroughs of Dudley, Sandwell, Walsall
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Debit Card
A debit card (also known as a bank card, plastic card or check card) is a plastic payment card that can be used instead of cash when making purchases. It is similar to a credit card, but unlike a credit card, the money comes directly from the user's bank account when performing a transaction. Some cards may carry a stored value with which a payment is made, while most relay a message to the cardholder's bank to withdraw funds from a payer's designated bank account. In some cases, the primary account number is assigned exclusively for use on the Internet and there is no physical card. In many countries, the use of debit cards has become so widespread that their volume has overtaken or entirely replaced cheques and, in some instances, cash transactions. The development of debit cards, unlike credit cards and charge cards, has generally been country specific resulting in a number of different systems around the world, which were often incompatible
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Four Wheel Drive
The Four Wheel Drive
Four Wheel Drive
Auto Company, more often known as Four Wheel Drive (FWD), was a pioneering American company that developed and produced all-wheel drive vehicles. It was founded in 1909 in Clintonville, Wisconsin, as the Badger Four-Wheel Drive Auto Company by Otto Zachow and William Besserdich.[1] The first production facility was built in 1911 and was designed by architect Wallace W. DeLong of Appleton Wisconsin.[2]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Four Wheel Drive
Four Wheel Drive
Auto Company 1918 ad in The Horseless Age.Share of the Four Wheel Drive
Four Wheel Drive
Auto Co., issued 6. May 1919Zachow and Besserdich developed and built the first successful four-wheel drive (4x4) car, the "Battleship", in 1908. Its success led to the founding of the company
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International E-road Network
The international E-road network is a numbering system for roads in Europe developed by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE). The network is numbered from E 1 up and its roads cross national borders. It also reaches Central Asian countries like Kyrgyzstan, since they are members of the UNECE. European main international traffic arteries are defined by ECE/TRANS/SC.1/2016/3/Rev.1 which consider three types of roads: motorways, express roads, and ordinary roads. In most countries, roads carry the European route designation beside national road numbers. Other countries like Belgium, Norway
Norway
and Sweden have roads with exclusive European route signage (Examples: E 18 and E 6), while at the other end of the scale, British road signs do not show the routes at all
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Heavy Goods Vehicle
A heavy goods vehicle (HGV), also large goods vehicle (LGV) or medium goods vehicle, is the European Union
European Union
(EU) term for any truck with a gross combination mass (GCM) of over 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb).[1] Sub-category N2 is used for vehicles between 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb) and 12,000 kilograms (26,455 lb) and N3 for all goods vehicles over 12,000 kilograms (26,455 lb) as defined in Directive 2001/116/EC. The term medium goods vehicle is used within parts of the UK government to refer to goods vehicles of between 3.5 and 7.5 tonnes which according to the EU are also 'large goods vehicles'.[2] Commercial carrier vehicles of up to 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb) are referred to as Light commercial vehicles and come into category N1. Confusingly though, parts of the UK government refer to these as 'Light Goods Vehicles' (also abbreviated 'LGV'),[3] with the term 'LGV' appearing on tax discs for these smaller vehicles
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Weeford
Weeford
Weeford
is a village and civil parish in the Lichfield
Lichfield
district of Staffordshire, England. According to the 2011 Census, the parish had a population of 215, an increase from 202 in the 2001 Census.[3] The name Weeford
Weeford
is believed to come from the Old English
Old English
Wēohford or Wēoford, and to mean "Holy ford",[4] or "ford by a heathen temple".[5] The medieval church is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin, and listed Grade II. It was rebuilt to its present form in 1802,[6][7] to a design by James Wyatt
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Electronic Toll Collection
Electronic toll collection
Electronic toll collection
(ETC) aims to eliminate the delay on toll roads, HOV lanes, toll bridges, and toll tunnels by collecting tolls without cash and without requiring cars to stop. Electronic toll booths may operate alongside cash lanes so that drivers who do not have transponders can pay a cashier or throw coins into a receptacle. With cashless tolling,[1] cars without transponders are either excluded or pay by plate – a bill may be mailed to the address where the car's license plate number is registered, or drivers may have a certain amount of time to pay with a credit card by phone
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