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M56 Motorway
The M56 motorway, also known as the North Cheshire
Cheshire
motorway, is in Cheshire
Cheshire
and Greater Manchester, England. It runs from Junction 4 of the M60 to Dunkirk, near Chester. With a length of 33.3 miles (53.6 km), it is often busy with long-distance commuter traffic towards North Wales
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European Route E22
The European route
European route
E 22 is one of the longest European routes. It has a length of about 5,320 km (3,310 mi)
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Chester Services
Chester
Chester
services is a motorway service area on the M56 in Cheshire. In August 2011 it was rated as 2 stars by quality assessors at Visit England.[1]Contents1 History 2 Location 3 Facilities[4]3.1 Hotel 3.2 Restaurants 3.3 Fuel 3.4 Shops4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Chester
Chester
services is the only proper motorway service area on the M56 motorway.[2] Prior to 1998 the site was just a rest or picnic area owned by the Department for Transport. The 'picnic' area lacked facilities (consisting of just a car park) and when developers were found it was then closed and redeveloped into the Roadchef
Roadchef
service area it is today.[3] Location[edit] Accessed from Junction 14 of the M56,[4] the services are located around 8 miles from Chester
Chester
city centre in Cheshire, England.The services are also accessible to the A5117 which also intersects at the same junction
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Rural
In general, a rural area or countryside is a geographic area that is located outside towns and cities.[1] The Health Resources and Services Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services defines the word rural as encompassing "...all population, housing, and territory not included within an urban area. Whatever is not urban is considered rural."[2] Typical rural areas have a low population density and small settlements. Agricultural areas are commonly rural, as are other types of areas such as forest
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Broomedge
Broomedge
Broomedge
is a village in Cheshire, England.This Cheshire
Cheshire
location article is a stub
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High Legh
High Legh
High Legh
is a village, civil and ecclesiastical parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire
Cheshire
East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. Six miles north west of Knutsford, seven miles east of Warrington
Warrington
and seventeen miles south west of Manchester
Manchester
City Centre, according to the 2001 census, the population of the entire civil parish was 1,632,[1] increasing slightly to 1,653 at the 2011 Census.[2]Contents1 History1.1 Coats of arms2 Transport 3 Education 4 Sport 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Unusually this village was the seat of two ancient landed gentry families for generations, namely: Leigh of West Hall and Cornwall-Legh of East Hall
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Appleton Thorn
Appleton Thorn
Appleton Thorn
is a village in the borough of Warrington
Warrington
in Cheshire, England. Appleton appeared in the Domesday survey as Epeltune,[1] meaning "the tun where the apples grew".Contents1 Bawming the Thorn 2 Famous places 3 See also 4 ReferencesBawming the Thorn[edit] Each June, the village hosts the ceremony of "Bawming the Thorn". The current form of the ceremony dates from the 19th century, when it was part of the village's "walking day".[2] It involved children from Appleton Thorn
Appleton Thorn
Primary School walking through the village and holding sports and games at the school. This now takes place at the village hall. The ceremony stopped in the 1930s, but was revived by the then headmaster, Mr Bob Jones in the early 1970s
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Frodsham
Frodsham
Frodsham
/ˈfrɒdʃəm/ is a market town, civil parish and electoral ward in the unitary authority of Cheshire
Cheshire
West and Chester
Chester
and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. Its population was 8,982 in 2001,[1] increasing to 9,077 at the 2011 Census.[2] It is approximately 3 miles (5 km) south of Runcorn, 16 miles (26 km) south of Liverpool, and 28 miles (45 km) southwest of Manchester. The River Weaver
River Weaver
runs to its northeast and on the west it overlooks the estuary of the River Mersey
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River Mersey
The River Mersey
River Mersey
/ˈmɜːrzi/ is a river in the North West of England. Its name is derived from the Anglo-Saxon language
Anglo-Saxon language
and translates as "boundary river". The river may have been the border between the ancient kingdoms of Mercia
Mercia
and Northumbria[1] and for centuries it formed part of the boundary between the historic counties of Lancashire
Lancashire
and Cheshire.[2] The start of the Mersey is at the confluence of the River Tame and River Goyt
River Goyt
in Stockport. It flows westwards through the suburban areas of south Manchester, then into the Manchester
Manchester
Ship Canal at Irlam, becoming a part of the canal and maintaining the canal's water levels. After 4 miles (6.4 km) the river exits the canal, flowing towards Warrington
Warrington
where the river widens
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Manchester Ship Canal
The Manchester
Manchester
Ship Canal is a 36-mile-long (58 km) inland waterway in the North West of England linking Manchester
Manchester
to the Irish Sea. Starting at the Mersey Estuary near Liverpool, it generally follows the original routes of the rivers Mersey and Irwell through the historic counties of Cheshire
Cheshire
and Lancashire. Several sets of locks lift vessels about 60 feet (18 m) up to Manchester, where the canal's terminus was built. Major landmarks along its route include the Barton Swing Aqueduct, the only swing aqueduct in the world, and Trafford Park, the world's first planned industrial estate and still the largest in Europe. The rivers Mersey and Irwell were first made navigable in the early 18th century
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A494 Road
The A494 is a trunk road in Wales. The route, which is officially known as the Dolgellau to South of Birkenhead Trunk Road, runs between the terminus of the M56 motorway between Mollington and Capenhurst and the A470 at Dolgellau, Gwynedd. Its northern sections remain among the busiest roads in Wales.[3]Contents1 History 2 Queensferry to Ewloe 3 Ewloe to Corwen 4 Druid to Dolgellau 5 See also 6 References 7 SourcesHistory[edit] The original routes into North Wales meant using fords when the Dee estuary was at low tide north west of Chester. But when the river was canalised in the 1730s several new coach roads were laid out through Sealand, Shotton and Queensferry. These were built by the Dee Company under the River Dee Act of 1743 to serve the hand-operated ferries which had replaced the fords.[4] By 1861 the ferry at Shotton was steam operated, with an engine house on the Queensferry side
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A55 Road
The A55, also known as the North Wales
North Wales
Expressway (Welsh: Gwibffordd Gogledd Cymru)[1] is a major road in Britain. Its entire length from Chester
Chester
to Holyhead
Holyhead
is a dual carriageway primary route, with the exception of the Britannia Bridge
Britannia Bridge
over the Menai Strait
Menai Strait
and several short sections where there are gaps in between the two carriageways. All junctions are grade separated apart from a roundabout east of Penmaenmawr
Penmaenmawr
and another nearby in Llanfairfechan. Initially, the road ran from Chester
Chester
to Bangor. In 2001, it was extended across Anglesey to the ferry port of Holyhead
Holyhead
parallel to the A5
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Roadchef
Roadchef
Roadchef
is a company which operates 30 motorway service areas in 21 locations in the UK. It is the third largest motorway service area operator, behind Moto and Welcome Break
Welcome Break
and followed by Extra).[2] In September 2014 it was announced that owners Delek
Delek
Group were selling Roadchef
Roadchef
to Antin for £153m.[3]Contents1 History 2 Locations 3 Facilities3.1 Catering 3.2 WHSmith 3.3 Cotton Traders4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Roadchef
Roadchef
was founded in July 1973 by Lindley Catering Investments and Galleon World Travel.[1][2] The company was originally family owned but in November 1995 was sold to a management team and its most recent change of ownership was to Antin Infrastructure Partners.[1] Over the years Roadchef
Roadchef
have acquired a portfolio of 21 sites
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Wythenshawe
Wythenshawe
Wythenshawe
(/ˈwɪðənʃɔː/; pop. 110,000)[citation needed] is an area of south Manchester, England. Historically in Cheshire,[1] in 1931 Wythenshawe
Wythenshawe
was transferred to the City of Manchester, which had begun building a massive housing estate there in the 1920s
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Moto Hospitality
Moto Hospitality
Hospitality
is a company which operates 58 motorway service stations across the United Kingdom. It's currently the UKs biggest service area operator. Moto is owned by USS whom bought it from Macquarie. Macquarie Bank managed Moto between when Compass Group
Compass Group
sold off SSP in April 2006 for £1,822 million and late 2015. As they have new owners and to keep up with their rivals, Moto is currently refurbishing sites with new restaurants.[1]Contents1 History 2 Other operations 3 Facilities3.1 WHSmith 3.2 Hotels 3.3 Catering 3.4 Barber Shop 3.5 Betting arcades 3.6 Fone Bitz 3.7 Petrol stations 3.8 Play areas4 Awards 5 Innovations 6 Locations6.1 Planned7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Granada, who owned the chain of Granada motorway service stations, merged with Compass in July 2000, to form Granada Compass plc
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Trunk Road
A trunk road, trunk highway, or strategic road is a major road, usually connecting two or more cities, ports, airports and other places, which is the recommended route for long-distance and freight traffic. Many trunk roads have segregated lanes in a dual carriageway, or are of motorway standard.[1]Contents1 United Kingdom1.1 De-trunking: United Kingdom2 Ireland2.1 De-trunking: Ireland3 United States 4 China 5 India 6 France 7 Poland 8 Sweden8.1 List of Swedish trunk roads9 See also 10 ReferencesUnited Kingdom[edit] See also: Trunk roads in Wales In the United Kingdom, trunk roads were first defined for Great Britain in the Trunk Roads Act 1936. Thirty major roads were classed as trunk roads and the minister of transport took direct control of them and the bridges across them
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