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M54 Motorway
The M54 is a 23-mile (37 km) east-west dual carriageway in the English counties of Shropshire
Shropshire
and Staffordshire
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Gailey, Staffordshire
Gailey is a small village in Staffordshire, England. It is at the junction of the A5 and A449 roads, and is on the boundary of the parishes of Brewood and Coven (formerly Brewood) and Penkridge, in South Staffordshire. The village was in existence at the time of the Domesday Book (1086) when it was referred to as Gragelie.[1] In the 19th century, Gailey was also known as Spread Eagle, from the name of the pub adjacent to the road junction.[2] In 1837, the Grand Junction Railway built a railway station in the village. The Rugby-Birmingham-Stafford Line still passes through the site, although the station at Gailey closed in 1951. See also[edit]Gailey ReservoirReferences[edit]^ "Gailey History". Roman-Britain.org. Archived from the original on 19 June 2009. Retrieved 2009-12-30.  ^ "'Penkridge: Introduction and manors', A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 5: East Cuttlestone hundred". 1959. pp. 103–126
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Grade Separated
Grade separation
Grade separation
is the name given to a method of aligning a junction of two or more surface transport axes at different heights (grades) so that they will not disrupt the traffic flow on other transit routes when they cross each other. The composition of such transport axes does not have to be uniform; it can consist of a mixture of roads, footpaths, railways, canals, or airport runways
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Rochester, Kent
Rochester (/ˈrɒtʃɪstər/ ROTCH-iss-tər) is a town and historic city in the unitary authority of Medway
Medway
in Kent, England. It is at the lowest bridging point of the River Medway
Medway
about 30 miles (50 km) from London. Rochester was for many years a favourite of Charles Dickens, who owned nearby Gads Hill Place, Higham,[1] basing many of his novels on the area
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Wroxeter
Wroxeter
Wroxeter
/ˈrɒksɪtər/ is a village in Shropshire, England. It forms part of the civil parish of Wroxeter and Uppington
Wroxeter and Uppington
and is located besides the River Severn, about 5 miles (8.0 km) south-east of Shrewsbury. It is best known for its impressive excavated remains of the Roman city of Viroconium
Viroconium
Cornoviorum, which was the fourth largest civitas capital in Roman Britain
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West Midlands Conurbation
The West Midlands conurbation
West Midlands conurbation
is the large conurbation that includes the cities of Birmingham
Birmingham
and Wolverhampton
Wolverhampton
and the large towns of Sutton Coldfield, Dudley, Walsall, West Bromwich, Solihull, Stourbridge
Stourbridge
and Halesowen
Halesowen
in the English West Midlands. Not to be confused with the region or metropolitan county of the same name, the conurbation does not include parts of the metropolitan county such as Coventry, but does include parts of the surrounding counties of Staffordshire
Staffordshire
(e.g
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Department For Transport
The Department for Transport
Department for Transport
(DfT) is the government department responsible for the English transport
English transport
network and a limited number of transport matters in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
that have not been devolved
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Carillion
Carillion
Carillion
plc is a British multinational facilities management and construction services company headquartered in Wolverhampton
Wolverhampton
in the United Kingdom. The company experienced financial difficulties in 2017, and went into compulsory liquidation on 15 January 2018, the most drastic procedure in UK insolvency law. Before its liquidation, it was the second largest construction company in the United Kingdom,[5] was listed on the London Stock Exchange, and had some 43,000 employees (around 19,000 of them in the United Kingdom). In the United Kingdom, the insolvency has caused project shutdowns and delays, job losses (in Carillion
Carillion
– 1,802 UK redundancies up to 3 April 2018 – and its suppliers), financial losses to joint venture partners and lenders, and potential financial losses to Carillion's 30,000 suppliers and 28,500 pensioners
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Featherstone, Staffordshire
Featherstone is a small village in the district of South Staffordshire, England, near to the border with Wolverhampton.Contents1 History 2 Today2.1 Schools 2.2 Churches 2.3 Shops and pubs 2.4 Transport links 2.5 Political representation3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Originally a farming community consisting of a few scattered farms, it is mentioned in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086, and was owned by the clergy of Wolverhampton
Wolverhampton
Church. It is possible that the population numbers were fairly static until the opening of a new mine, Hilton Main, in the 1920s, it closed in 1969. The Duke of Cleveland
Duke of Cleveland
was lord of the manor of this small township of 550 acres and just 34 souls in 1851. This was once the residence of John Huntbach, the noted antiquary
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Tarmac Limited
Tarmac is a British building materials company headquartered in Solihull, England. The company was formed as Lafarge Tarmac
Lafarge Tarmac
in March 2013, by the merger of Anglo American's Tarmac UK and Lafarge's operations in the United Kingdom. In July 2014, Anglo American agreed to sell its stake to Lafarge, to assist Lafarge in its merger with Holcim
Holcim
and allay competition concerns. Prior to 1999, Tarmac Plc was an aggregates to construction company dating from 1903. It was demerged in July 1999, with the Construction and Professional services arms forming Carillion
Carillion
plc. The aggregates and building materials side of the business retained the Tarmac name and was bought by Anglo American shortly afterwards. In February 2015, Lafarge announced that the business would be sold to CRH plc, once Anglo American had sold its stake
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Thomas Telford
Thomas Telford
Telford
FRS, FRSE (9 August 1757 – 2 September 1834) was a Scottish civil engineer, architect and stonemason, and a noted road, bridge and canal builder. After establishing himself as an engineer of road and canal projects in Shropshire, he designed numerous infrastructure projects in his native Scotland, as well as harbours and tunnels
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A464 Road
List of A roads in zone 4 in Great Britain starting north of the A4 and south/west of the A5 (roads beginning with 4).Contents1 Single- and double-digit roads 2 Triple-digit roads 3 Four-digit roads (40xx) 4 Four-digit roads (41xx) 5 Four-digit roads (42xx and higher)Single- and double-digit roads[edit]Road From To Notes A4 road City of London (Holborn Circus) Avonmouth Originally London to Bath A40 road City of London (near St. Paul's Cathedral) Fishguard The longest A road in Zone 4 at 256 miles long A41 road Central London (near Marble Arch) Birkenhead A large section of the former A41, from Bicester to Solihull, was downgraded when the northern extension of the M40 motorway was opened, as was a section in Birmingham due to other road improvements; most of it is now the non-contiguous B4100. A42 road Kegworth Appleby Magna A continuation of the M42, hence the use of A42 despite being entirely in Zone 5
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Wellington
Wellington
Wellington
(/ˈwɛlɪŋtən/; Māori: Te Whanganui-a-Tara [te ˈfanganʉi a tara]) is the capital city and second most populous urban area of New Zealand, with 412,500 residents.[3] It is located at the south-western tip of the North Island, between Cook Strait
Cook Strait
and the Rimutaka Range
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Oakengates
Oakengates
Oakengates
is a town in the borough of Telford and Wrekin
Telford and Wrekin
and ceremonial county of Shropshire, England, and now forms part of the new town of Telford. The parish's population was recorded as 8,517 in the 2001 census.[1] The name has nothing to do with Oak or Gates but is derived from the Ancient Brythonic name for the valley which was Usc-con, meaning The Lake(Usc(water) and the confluence(Cond) of two streams (see Cartlidge), and from the Old Norse gata, path; see gh- in Indo-European roots. meaning boundary or Road. So Usc-con gait is at the Road at the vale of Usc-con. A history of Oakengates
Oakengates
was written by local historian Reverend J.E.G
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Subbase
In topology, a subbase (or subbasis) for a topological space X with topology T is a subcollection B of T that generates T, in the sense that T is the smallest topology containing B. A slightly different definition is used by some authors, and there are other useful equivalent formulations of the definition; these are discussed below.Contents1 Definition1.1 Alternative definition2 Examples 3 Results using subbases3.1 Alexander subbase theorem4 See also 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Let X be a topological space with topology T. A subbase of T is usually defined as a subcollection B of T satisfying one of the two following equivalent conditions:The subcollection B generates the topology T. This means that T is the smallest topology containing B: any topology T' on X containing B must also contain T. The collection of open sets consisting of all finite intersections of elements of B, together with the set X, forms a basis for T
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Asphalt
Asphalt, also known as bitumen (UK: /ˈbɪtʃəmən/, US: /bɪˈtjuːmən, baɪ-/),[1] is a sticky, black, and highly viscous liquid or semi-solid form of petroleum. It may be found in natural deposits or may be a refined product, and is classed as a pitch. Before the 20th century, the term asphaltum was also used.[2] The word is derived from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
ἄσφαλτος ásphaltos.[3] The primary use (70%) of asphalt is in road construction, where it is used as the glue or binder mixed with aggregate particles to create asphalt concrete. Its other main uses are for bituminous waterproofing products, including production of roofing felt and for sealing flat roofs.[4] The terms "asphalt" and "bitumen" are often used interchangeably to mean both natural and manufactured forms of the substance
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