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M18 Hellcat
The M18 Hellcat
M18 Hellcat
(officially designated the 76 mm Gun Motor Carriage M18 or M18 GMC) was an American tank destroyer of World War II, used in the Italian, European, and Pacific theatres, and in the Korean War. It was the fastest U.S. tracked armored vehicle until the turboshaft-powered M1 Abrams
M1 Abrams
main battle tank appeared decades later.[3] The speed was attained by keeping armor to a minimum, and by equipping the relatively small vehicle with the same radial engine used on the much larger Sherman tank. The Hellcat was the most effective U.S. tank destroyer of World War II. It had a higher kill to loss ratio than any tank or tank destroyer fielded by U.S
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Gun Turret
A gun turret is a location from which weapons can be fired that affords protection, visibility, and some cone of fire. A modern gun turret is generally a weapon mount that houses the crew or mechanism of a projectile-firing weapon and at the same time lets the weapon be aimed and fired in some degree of azimuth and elevation (cone of fire).Contents1 Description1.1 Cupolas2 Warships2.1 History2.1.1 UK: first designs 2.1.2 United States: USS Monitor 2.1.3 Later designs2.2 Layout 2.3 Wing turrets 2.4 Modern turrets 2.5 Turret
Turret
identification3 Aircraft3.1 History 3.2 Layout 3.3 Gallery4 Combat vehicles4.1 History 4.2 Layout5 Land fortifications5.1 Gallery6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 References8.1 Bibliography9 External linksDescription[edit] Rotating gun turrets have the protection, the weapon, and its crew rotate
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Ordnance QF 6-pounder
The Ordnance Quick-Firing 6-pounder 7 cwt, or just 6 pounder,[note 1] was a British 57 mm gun, serving as a primary anti-tank gun of the British Army
British Army
during World War II, as well as the main armament for a number of armoured fighting vehicles. Although planned before the start of the war, it did not reach service until the North African Campaign
North African Campaign
in April 1942. There it replaced the 2 pounder in the anti-tank role, allowing the 25 pounder gun-howitzer to revert to its intended artillery role
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75 Mm Gun (US)
The US 75 mm gun tank gun M2 and the later M3 were the standard American tank guns of the World War II, used primarily on the two main American medium tanks of the war, the M3 Lee
M3 Lee
(M2 or M3 gun) and the M4 Sherman (M3 gun). The lightweight M6 and M5 variants were developed to equip the M24 Chaffee light tank, and the -G and -H subtypes of the B-25 Mitchell bomber respectively. The M3 was also used on the prototype M7 Medium Tank platform.Contents1 History 2 Variants 3 Penetration comparison 4 See also4.1 Weapons of comparable role, performance and era5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]M2 75 mm gun as mounted in medium tank M3The 75 mm tank gun has its origins in the famous French Canon de 75 modèle 1897 field gun of World War I
World War I
fame[citation needed], which was also adopted by the United States and used well into World War II as the 75 mm M1897 field gun
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Powerpack (drivetrain)
A powerpack or power pack is a part of a modular powertrain that contains some type of engine (most frequently an internal combustion engine but other types, including electric motors, are possible) and may also contain a transmission and various supporting components.Contents1 Applications 2 Advantages 3 See also 4 ReferencesApplications[edit] Powerpacks are used with certain types of industrial equipment designs, including vehicle designs such as forklifts and cherry picker lifts but also stationary equipment such as paint sprayers
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Transmission (mechanics)
A transmission is a machine in a power transmission system, which provides controlled application of the power. Often the term transmission refers simply to the gearbox that uses gears and gear trains to provide speed and torque conversions from a rotating power source to another device.[1][2] In British English, the term transmission refers to the whole drivetrain, including clutch, gearbox, prop shaft (for rear-wheel drive), differential, and final drive shafts. In American English, however, the term refers more specifically to the gearbox alone, and detailed usage differs.[note 1] The most common use is in motor vehicles, where the transmission adapts the output of the internal combustion engine to the drive wheels. Such engines need to operate at a relatively high rotational speed, which is inappropriate for starting, stopping, and slower travel. The transmission reduces the higher engine speed to the slower wheel speed, increasing torque in the process
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M2 Browning Machine Gun
The M2 Machine Gun or Browning .50 Caliber Machine Gun is a heavy machine gun designed toward the end of World War I
World War I
by John Browning. Its design is similar to Browning's earlier M1919 Browning machine gun, which was chambered for the .30-06
.30-06
cartridge. The M2 uses the much larger and much more powerful .50 BMG
.50 BMG
cartridge, which was developed alongside and takes its name from the gun itself (BMG standing for Browning Machine Gun). It has been referred to as "Ma Deuce",[13] in reference to its M2 nomenclature. The design has had many specific designations; the official designation for the current infantry type is Browning Machine Gun, Cal. .50, M2, HB, Flexible. It is effective against infantry, unarmored or lightly armored vehicles and boats, light fortifications and low-flying aircraft
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Glacis
A glacis (/ˈɡleɪ.sɪs/; French: [ɡlasi]) in military engineering is an artificial slope as part of a medieval castle or in early modern fortresses. They may be constructed of earth as a temporary structure or of stone in more permanent structure. A glacis plate is the sloped front-most section of the hull of a tank or other armoured fighting vehicle. More generally, a glacis is any slope, natural or artificial, which fulfils the above requirements. The etymology of this French word suggests a slope made dangerous with ice, hence the relationship with glacier.Contents1 Ancient fortifications 2 Medieval fortifications 3 Early modern European fortifications 4 Armored vehicles 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesAncient fortifications[edit]The ramparts and ditches of Maiden Castle.A glacis could also appear in ancient fortresses, such as the one the ancient Egyptians built at Semna in Nubia
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Tiger I
The Tiger I
Tiger I
 listen (help·info) is a German heavy tank of World War II
World War II
deployed from 1942 in Africa
Africa
and Europe, usually in independent heavy tank battalions. Its final designation was Panzerkampfwagen VI Tiger Ausf. E often shortened to Tiger. The Tiger I
Tiger I
gave the Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
its first armoured fighting vehicle that mounted the 8.8 cm KwK 36
8.8 cm KwK 36
gun (not to be confused with the 8.8 cm Flak 36). 1,347 were built between August 1942 and August 1944.[9] After August 1944, production of the Tiger I
Tiger I
was phased out in favour of the Tiger II. While the Tiger I
Tiger I
has been called an outstanding design for its time,[10] it was over-engineered,[11] using expensive materials and labour-intensive production methods
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Sniper
A sniper is a military/paramilitary marksman who operates to maintain effective visual contact with the enemy and engage targets from concealed positions or at distances exceeding their detection capabilities.[1] Snipers generally have specialized training and are equipped with high-precision rifles and high-magnification optics, and often feed information back to their units or command headquarters. In addition to marksmanship and long range shooting, military snipers are trained in a variety of tactical techniques: detection, stalking, and target range estimation methods, camouflage, field craft, infiltration, special reconnaissance and observation, surveillance and target acquisition.Contents1 Etymology 2 Modern warfare2.1 Military
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37 Mm Gun M3
The 37 mm Gun M3 was the first dedicated anti-tank gun fielded by United States forces in numbers. Introduced in 1940, it became the standard anti-tank gun of the U.S. infantry with its size enabling it to be pulled by a jeep. However, the continuing improvement of German tanks quickly rendered the 37 mm ineffective and, by 1943, it was being gradually replaced in the European and Mediterranean theaters by the more powerful British-developed 57 mm Gun M1
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Hand Grenade
A grenade is a small weapon typically thrown by hand. Generally, a grenade consists of an explosive charge, a detonating mechanism, and firing pin to trigger the detonating mechanism. Once the soldier throws the grenade, the safety lever releases, the striker throws the safety lever away from the grenade body as it rotates to detonate the primer. The primer explodes and ignites the fuse (sometimes called the delay element). The fuse burns down to the detonator, which explodes the main charge. There are several types of grenades such as fragmentation grenades and stick grenades. Fragmentation grenades are probably the most common in armies. They are weapons that are designed to disperse lethal fragments on detonation. The body is generally made of a hard synthetic material or steel, which will provide some fragmentation as shards and splinters, though in modern grenades a pre-formed fragmentation matrix is often used
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Fragmentation (weaponry)
Fragmentation is the process by which the casing of an artillery or mortar shell, rocket, missile, bomb, grenade, etc. is shattered by the detonation of the explosive filler. The correct term for these pieces is "fragmentation" (sometimes shortened to frag); "shards" or "splinters" can be used for non-preformed fragments. Preformed fragments can be of various shapes (spheres, cubes, rods, etc.) and sizes, and are normally held rigidly within some form of matrix or body until the high explosive (HE) filling is detonated
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Asiatic-Pacific Theater
Theatre
Theatre
or theater[1] is a collaborative form of fine art that uses live performers, typically actors or actresses, to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place, often a stage. The performers may communicate this experience to the audience through combinations of gesture, speech, song, music, and dance
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