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Mêlée Weapon
A melee weapon or close combat weapon is any weapon used in direct hand-to-hand combat; by contrast with ranged weapons which act at a distance. The term melee originates in the 1640s from the French word mêlée, which refers to hand-to-hand combat, a close quarters battle, a brawl, a confused fight, etc.[1][2][3]Contents1 Categories 2 List of melee weapons 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesCategories[edit] Melee
Melee
weapons can be broadly divided into three categories:Pointed weapons, which cover spears, pikes and almost all polearms. They typically have a sharp point designed to inflict penetrating trauma, even against heavily armoured opponents, and the length of such weapons gives a range advantage
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Close Combat
Close combat
Close combat
means a violent physical confrontation between two or more opponents at short range.[1][2]Contents1 Armed and unarmed confrontations 2 Tactical doctrine 3 See also 4 ReferencesArmed and unarmed confrontations[edit] Among many types of fighting encompassed by the general term close combat are the modern terms hand-to-hand combat and close quarters combat (CQC). Close combat
Close combat
occurs when opposing military forces engage in restricted areas, an environment frequently encountered in urban warfare. Military small unit tactics traditionally regarded as forms of close combat include fighting with hand-held or hand-thrown weapons such as swords, knives, axes, or tools. In modern times, (since World War II), the term "close combat" has also come to describe unarmed hand-to-hand combat, as well as combat involving firearms and other distance weapons when used at short range. William E
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Guandao
A guandao is a type of Chinese pole weapon that is used in some forms of Chinese martial arts. In Chinese, it is properly called a yanyuedao (偃月刀; lit. "reclining moon blade"), the name under which it always appears in texts from the Song to Qing dynasties such as the Wujing Zongyao and Huangchao Liqi Tushi. It is comparable to the Japanese naginata and the European fauchard or glaive and consists of a heavy blade with a spike at the back and sometimes also a notch at the spike's upper base that can catch an opponent's weapon. In addition there are often irregular serrations that lead the back edge of the blade to the spike. The blade is mounted atop a 1.5 m to 1.8 m (5–6 foot) long wooden or metal pole with a pointed metal counter weight used to balance the heavy blade and for striking on the opposite end. On modern versions, a red sash or tassel is attached at the joint of the pole and blade
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Falx
The "Falx" was a weapon with a curved blade that was sharp on the inside edge used by the Thracians and Dacians – and, later, a siege hook used by the Romans themselves.Contents1 Etymology 2 Dacian falx2.1 Effectiveness3 Thracian falx 4 Development 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] "Falx" is a Latin word originally meaning sickle but was later used to mean any of a number of tools that had a curved blade that was sharp on the inside edge such as a scythe. Falx was also used to mean a weapon – particularly that of the Thracians and Dacians – and, later, a siege hook used by the Romans themselves. Dacian falx[edit]Dacian Weaponry including a falx (top) exhibited in Cluj National History Museum[1]In Latin texts, the weapon was described as an ensis falcatus (whence falcata) by Ovid in Metamorphose and as a falx supina by Juvenal in Satiriae. The Dacian falx came in two sizes: one-handed and two-handed
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Bec De Corbin
A bec de corbin is a type of pole weapon and war hammer that was popular in medieval Europe. The name is Old French for "raven's beak" or "beak of the crow". Similar to the Lucerne hammer, it consists of a modified hammer's head and spike mounted atop a long pole. Unlike the Lucerne hammer, the bec de corbin was used primarily with the 'beak' or fluke to attack instead of the hammer head. The hammer face balancing the beak was often blunt instead of the multi-pronged Lucerne, and the beak tended to be stouter; better designed for tearing into thinner plate armor, chainmail or padded jacks . Also, the spike mounted on the top of head was not nearly as long and thin as in the Lucerne
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Whip
A whip is a tool which was traditionally designed to strike animals or people to aid guidance or exert control over animals or other people, through pain compliance or fear of pain, although in some activities, whips can be used without use of pain, such as an additional pressure aid or visual directional cue in equestrianism. Whips are generally of two types, either a firm stick designed for direct contact, or a flexible whip that requires a specialized swing to be effective, but has a longer reach and greater force, but may have less precision. There are also whips which combine both a firm stick (the stock or handle) and a flexible line (the lash or thong), such as hunting whips. The majority of whips are designed for use on animals, although whips such as the "cat o' nine tails" and knout were specifically developed for flagellation as a means of inflicting corporal punishment or torture on human targets
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Bladed Weapon
Bladed and edged weapons[1] have been used throughout history for combat, hunting and in ceremonies. Bladed weapons include swords, knives and, in more recent times, bayonets. Edged weapons are used to hack and slash but, depending on the weapon, to also thrust and stab. Not all swords, knives and bayonets have blades, but points – intended for thrusting rather than slashing. Other dedicated edged weapons include battleaxes and poleaxes.[2] Many edged tools, especially agricultural tools such as axes and scythes, have been used as improvised weapons by peasantry, militia, or irregular forces – particularly as an expedient for defence. Edged weapons and blades are associated with the premodern age but continue to be used in modern armies
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Knife
A knife (plural knives) is a tool with a cutting edge or blade, hand-held or otherwise, with most having a handle. Some types of knives are used as utensils, including knives used at the dining table (e.g., butter knives and steak knives) and knives used in the kitchen (e.g., paring knife, bread knife, cleaver). Many types of knives are used as tools, such as the combat knife carried by soldiers, the pocket knife carried by hikers and the hunting knife used by hunters. Knives are also used as a traditional or religious implement, such as the kirpan. Some types of knives are used as weapons, such as daggers or switchblades. Some types of knives are used as sports equipment (e.g., throwing knives)
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List Of Daggers
The following is a list of daggers.Contents1 Pre-historic daggers 2 European tradition 3 Asian tradition 4 African tradition 5 American tradition 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksPre-historic daggers[edit]Acinaces Bronze Age dagger Parazonium Pugio SicaEuropean tradition[edit]High Middle AgesKnightly daggerLate Middle Ages Baselard
Baselard
(14th-century long cutting dagger) Bollock dagger, Rondel dagger,
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Sickle
A sickle, or bagging hook, is a hand-held agricultural tool designed with variously curved blades and typically used for harvesting, or reaping, grain crops or cutting succulent forage chiefly for feeding livestock, either freshly cut or dried as hay. Falx
Falx
was a synonym but was later used to mean any of a number of tools that had a curved blade that was sharp on the inside edge such as a scythe. Since the beginning of the Iron Age
Iron Age
hundreds of region-specific variants of the sickle have evolved, initially of iron and later steel. This great diversity of sickle types across many cultures can be divided into smooth or serrated blades, both of which can be used for cutting either green grass or mature cereals using slightly different techniques
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Kama (weapon)
The kama (鎌 or かま) is a traditional Japanese farming implement similar to a sickle used for reaping crops and also employed as a weapon. It is often included in weapon training segments of martial arts. Sometimes referred to as kai or "double kai", kama made with intentionally dull blades for kata demonstration purposes are referred to as kata kai.Contents1 History 2 Technique 3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Before being improvised as a weapon, the kama was widely used throughout Asia
Asia
to cut crops, mostly rice. It is found in many shapes and forms in Southeast Asia[1] and is particularly common in martial arts from Malaysia, Indonesia
Indonesia
and the Philippines. It is also used in Chinese martial arts
Chinese martial arts
but not often
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Polearms
A pole weapon or pole arm is a close combat weapon in which the main fighting part of the weapon is fitted to the end of a long shaft, typically of wood, thereby extending the user's effective range. Spears, glaives, poleaxes, halberds, and naginata are all varieties of pole arms. The purpose of using pole weapons is either to extend reach or to increase leverage (thanks to hands moving freely on a pole) and thus increase striking power. Because they contain relatively little metal, pole arms are cheap to make. This has made them the favored weapon of peasant levies and peasants in rebellion the world over. Many are adapted from farm implements, or other tools. Pole arms were common weapons on medieval European battlefields. Their range and impact force made them effective weapons against armored warriors on horseback, because they could penetrate armor. The Renaissance saw a plethora of different varieties
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War Scythe
A war scythe or military scythe is a form of pole weapon with a curving single-edged blade with the cutting edge on the concave side of the blade. Its blade bears some superficial resemblance to that of an agricultural scythe from which it likely evolved, but the war scythe is otherwise unrelated to agricultural tools and is a purpose-built infantry melee weapon. The blade of a war scythe has regularly proportioned flats, a thickness comparable to that of a spear or sword blade, and slightly curves along its edge as it tapers to its point
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Billhook
The billhook is a traditional cutting tool used widely in agriculture and forestry for cutting smaller woody material such as shrubs and branches and is distinct from the sickle. It is very common in the wine-growing countries of Europe. Elsewhere, it either developed locally such as in China, India and Japan, or was introduced by European settlers, such as in North and South America, South Africa and Australasia.Contents1 Design 2 Styles of billhook2.1 Principles of design 2.2 Northern, Midland and Welsh designs (UK) 2.3 Southern designs (UK) 2.4 Other hooks3 Modern usage 4 Military use 5 See also 6 Footnotes 7 External linksDesign[edit] The blade is usually made from a medium-carbon steel in varying weights and lengths, but typically 20 to 25 centimetres (7.9 to 9.8 in) long. Blades are straight near the handle but have an increasingly strong curve towards the end
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Blunt Weapon
A blunt instrument is any solid object used as a weapon, which damages its target by applying direct mechanical force, and has no penetrating point or edge, or is wielded so that the point or edge is not the part of the weapon that inflicts the injury. Blunt instruments may be contrasted with edged weapons, which inflict injury by cutting or stabbing, or projectile weapons, where the projectiles, such as bullets or arrows, are accelerated to a damaging speed. Blunt instruments typically inflict blunt force trauma, causing bruising, fractures and other internal bleeding.[1] Depending on the parts of the body attacked, organs may be ruptured or otherwise damaged. Attacks with a blunt instrument may be fatal. Some sorts of blunt instruments are very readily available, and often figure in crime cases
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