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Métis In Alberta
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t e Métis in Alberta
Alberta
are Métis people, descendants of mixed First Nations/native Indian and white/European families, who live in the Canadian province
Canadian province
of Alberta. The Métis are considered an aboriginal group under Canada's constitution
Canada's constitution
but are in some respects separate from the First Nations
First Nations
(though they live in the same regions and have cultural similarities), and have different legal rights. In Alberta, unlike in the rest of Canada, Métis people have negotiated certain lands to be reserved for them, known as Métis Settlements (Metis Betterment Act 1938)
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Indigenous Peoples In Quebec
Indigenous peoples in Quebec
Quebec
total 11 distinct ethnic groups. The 10 First Nations
First Nations
and the Inuit
Inuit
communities number 141,915 people and account for approximately 2% of the population of Quebec, Canada.Contents1 Inuit 2 First Nations2.1 Algonquian2.1.1 Abenakis 2.1.2 Atikamekw 2.1.3 Crees 2.1.4 Malecites 2.1.5 Mi'kmaqs 2.1.6 Innus 2.1.7 Naskapis2.2 Iroquoian2.2.1 Wendats 2.2.2 Mohawks3 Recognized rights 4 See also 5 External linksInuit[edit] The Inuit
Inuit
communities of Quebec
Quebec
are located in the northernmost part of the province, in an area known as Nunavik
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Canadian Province
The provinces and territories of Canada
Canada
are the administrative divisions that are responsible for the delivery of sub-national governance within the geographical areas of Canada
Canada
under the authority of the Canadian Constitution. In the 1867 Canadian Confederation, three provinces of British North America—New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada
Canada
(which, upon Confederation, was divided into Ontario
Ontario
and Quebec)—were united to form a federated colony, which eventually became a sovereign nation in the next century. Over its history, Canada's international borders have changed several times, and the country has grown from the original four provinces to the current ten provinces and three territories
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Americanist Phonetic Notation
Americanist phonetic notation, also known as the North American Phonetic Alphabet
Alphabet
or NAPA, is a system of phonetic notation originally developed by European and American anthropologists and language scientists (students of Neogrammarians) for the phonetic and phonemic transcription of indigenous languages of the Americas and for languages of Europe. It is still commonly used by linguists working on, among others, Slavic, Uralic, Semitic languages
Semitic languages
and for the languages of the Caucasus and of India (however, Uralists commonly use a variant known as the Uralic Phonetic Alphabet). The term "Americanist phonetic alphabet" is misleading because it has always been widely used outside the Americas
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First Nations In Manitoba
First Nations
First Nations
in Manitoba constitute of over 130,000 registered people. Of those, about 60% live on reserve. There are 63 First Nations in the Province and five indigenous linguistic groups. The languages are nihi`wawinCree, Ojibwe, Dakota, Oji-Cree
Oji-Cree
and Dene. They are listed by common usage names but other names may be applied in certain areas
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Mythologies Of The Indigenous Peoples Of North America
The mythologies of the indigenous peoples of North America comprise many bodies of traditional narratives associated with religion from a mythographical perspective. Indigenous North American belief systems include many sacred narratives. Such spiritual stories are deeply based in Nature and are rich with the symbolism of seasons, weather, plants, animals, earth, water, sky and fire. The principle of an all embracing, universal and omniscient Great Spirit, a connection to the Earth, diverse creation narratives and collective memories of ancient ancestors are common. Traditional worship practices are often a part of tribal gatherings with dance, rhythm, songs and trance (e.g
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Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas
The indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
are the pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas
Americas
and their descendants. Although some indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
were traditionally hunter-gatherers—and many, especially in the Amazon basin, still are—many groups practiced aquaculture and agriculture. The impact of their agricultural endowment to the world is a testament to their time and work in reshaping and cultivating the flora indigenous to the Americas.[24] Although some societies depended heavily on agriculture, others practiced a mix of farming, hunting and gathering
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Missing And Murdered Indigenous Women
Missing and murdered Indigenous women
Missing and murdered Indigenous women
(MMIW) is an issue affecting Indigenous people in Canada
Canada
and the United States, including the First Nations, Inuit,
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Idle No More
methods includeCivil disobedience Demonstrations Hunger strikes Internet activism Nonviolent resistance Picketing Transportation blocks Idle No More
Idle No More
is an ongoing protest movement, founded in December 2012 by four women: three First Nations
First Nations
women and one non-Native ally. It is a grassroots movement among the Aboriginal peoples in Canada comprising the First Nations, Métis and Inuit
Inuit
peoples and their non-Aboriginal supporters in Canada, and to a lesser extent, internationally. It has consisted of a number of political actions worldwide, inspired in part by the liquid diet hunger strike of Attawapiskat
Attawapiskat
Chief Theresa Spence[1] and further coordinated via social media
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White People
White people
White people
is a racial classification specifier, used for people of Caucasian ancestry, with the exact implications dependent on context. The usage of "white people" or a "white race" for a large group of (mainly European) populations, defined besides other characteristics by their light skin and contrasting with "black people", Native Americans, "colored" or "persons of color" originated in the 17th century. It was only during the 18th century, that this floating category was transformed in a quasi-scientific system of race and skin color relations. The concept of a homogeneous white race did not achieve universal acceptance in Europe. The strongest proponents of ethnocentrism in particular, such as Fascist Italy
Italy
and Nazi Germany, regarded some European peoples
European peoples
as racially distinct from themselves
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Indigenous Peoples Of The Pacific Northwest Coast
The indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
Coast are composed of many nations and tribal affiliations, each with distinctive cultural and political identities, but they share certain beliefs, traditions and practices, such as the centrality of salmon as a resource and spiritual symbol. The term Northwest Coast or North West Coast is used in anthropology to refer to the groups of Indigenous people residing along the coast of British Columbia, Washington state, parts of Alaska, Oregon, and northern California. The term Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
is largely used in the American context. At one point the region had the highest population density of a region inhabited by Aboriginal peoples in Canada.[1][2][3]Chief Anotklosh of the Taku Tribe of the Tlingit
Tlingit
people, ca
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Ethnic Groups In Europe
The Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples
of Europe
Europe
are the focus of European ethnology, the field of anthropology related to the various indigenous groups that reside in the nations of Europe. According to German monograph Minderheitenrechte in Europa co-edited by Pan and Pfeil (2002) there are 87 distinct peoples of Europe, of which 33 form the majority population in at least one sovereign state, while the remaining 54 constitute ethnic minorities. The total number of national or linguistic minority populations in Europe
Europe
is estimated at 105 million people, or 14% of 770 million Europeans.[1] There is no precise or universally accepted definition of the terms "ethnic group" or "nationality"
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Numbered Treaties
Key representatives of the British Crown: Adams George Archibald, Alexander Morris, David Laird, Duncan Campbell Scott, Wemyss Mackenzie Simpson, S.J Dawson, William J. Christie, James McKay, James MacLeod, James Hamilton Ross, J.A.J
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Hudson's Bay Company
The Hudson's Bay Company
Hudson's Bay Company
(HBC; French: Compagnie de la Baie d'Hudson), is a Canadian retail business group. A fur trading business for much of its existence, HBC now owns and operates retail stores in Canada, the United States, and parts of Europe, including Belgium, The Netherlands, and Germany. The company's namesake business division is Hudson's Bay, commonly referred to as The Bay (La Baie in French).[7] Other divisions include Galeria Kaufhof, Gilt, Home Outfitters, Lord & Taylor, and Saks Fifth Avenue. HBC's head office was in the Simpson Tower in Toronto, but it relocated northwest of Toronto
Toronto
to Brampton, Ontario.[8] The company is listed on the Toronto
Toronto
Stock Exchange under the symbol "HBC". The company was incorporated by English royal charter in 1670 as The Governor and Company of Adventurers of England trading into Hudson's Bay
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Canada's Constitution
The Constitution of Canada is the supreme law in Canada;[1] the country's constitution is an amalgamation of codified acts and uncodified traditions and conventions
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Fur Trade In North America
The North American fur trade
North American fur trade
was the industry and activities related to the acquisition, trade, exchange, and sale of animal furs in North America. Aboriginal peoples in Canada
Aboriginal peoples in Canada
and Native Americans in the United States of different regions traded among themselves in the Pre-Columbian
Pre-Columbian
Era, but Europeans participated in the trade beginning from the time of their arrival in the New World and extended its reach to Europe. The French started trading in the 16th century, the English established trading posts on Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
in present-day Canada in the 17th century, and the Dutch had trade by the same time in New Netherland
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