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Lunu Miris
Lunumiris
Lunumiris
(Sinhala:ලුණු මිරිස් [lunu-miris] some also refer it as "Katta Sambal" [Sinhala:කට්ට සම්බෝල [kaṭṭa sambōla]]) is a spicy Sri Lankan sambal paste served as a condiment. It consists of chili pepper, red onions, Maldive fish, sea salt, black pepper and lime juice, usually ground with mortar and pestle or grind stone. However red onions aren't used when making katta sambal, and red onions is used in lunu miris so lunu miris has a more wet texture than katta sambal. This is a paste which is a little bit hot because of the chili powder added. Lunumiris
Lunumiris
with Kiribath Lunumiris
Lunumiris
with AppamContents1 Etymology 2 Usage 3 Ingredients 4 Health Effects 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The translation of Sinhala word Lunumiris
Lunumiris
loosely translates to Salt Chili in Sinhala
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Yugwa
Soups & stewsGuk Tang Jeongol Jijimi JjigaeBanchanBokkeum BuchimgaeJeonBugak Gui Hoe Jjim Jokpyeon Jorim Muk Namul Pyeonyuk Po Seon SsamDesserts HangwaDasik Gwapyeon Jeonggwa Kkultarae Suksilgwa Yakbap Yeot Yeotgangjeong YugwaGangjeong HangwaYumilgwaMandugwa Taraegwa YakgwaTteokBaekseolgi Bupyeon Gyeongdan Injeolmi Jeolpyeon Jeungpyeon Mujigae-tteok Siru-tteok SongpyeonBeverages List of Korean beveragesCha Hwachae Sikhye Sul(alcoholic beverages) SujeonggwaCondimentsDoenjang GanjangGukganjang EoganjangGochujang Honey Cheong Mustard sauce OilPerilla oil Sesame
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Ceylon (curry)
Ceylon
Ceylon
is the name given to a family of curry recipes with the key ingredients being coconut, lime, and a specific Ceylon
Ceylon
curry powder, which classifies it as "hot" on most guides.[1][2] Its name originates from Ceylon, the former name of modern-day Sri Lanka.[citation needed] External links[edit]^ Zindagee.co.uk. Zindagee Curry
Curry
Glossary. Accessed 29 December 2006. ^ Geocities.com
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Nasi Goreng
Nasi goreng
Nasi goreng
(English pronunciation: /ˌnɑːsi ɡɒˈrɛŋ/), literally meaning "fried rice" in both the Malay and Indonesian languages,[4][5] is an Indonesian rice dish with pieces of meat and vegetables added.[6] It can refer simply to fried pre-cooked rice, a meal including stir fried rice in a small amount of cooking oil or margarine, typically spiced with kecap manis (sweet soy sauce), shallot, garlic, ground shrimp paste, tamarind and chilli and accompanied by other ingredients, particularly egg, chicken and prawns. There is also another kind of nasi goreng which is made with ikan asin (salted dried fish) which is also popular across Indonesia. Nasi goreng
Nasi goreng
is sometimes described as Indonesian stir-fried rice,[1][2] although it is also popular in Southeast Asia
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Puttu
Puttu
Puttu
pronounced [ˈputtu], (Malayalam: പുട്ട്), (Tamil: புட்டு), (Kannada: ಪುಟ್ಟು), (Sinhala පිට්ටු ) is a breakfast dish from the Indian subcontinent, eaten in Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Kanara
Kanara
region of Karnataka, and Sri Lanka. Puttu
Puttu
or Pittu means "portioned" in Tamil language. It is made of steamed cylinders of ground rice layered with coconut. It is highly popular in the Indian state of Kerala
Kerala
as well as in many areas of Sri Lanka, where it is also known as pittu. Puttu
Puttu
is served with side dishes such as palm sugar or chickpea curry or banana
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Rice And Curry
Rice
Rice
and curry is a popular dish in the Southern Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Karnataka, Kerala, and Tamil Nadu, as well as in Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and Bangladesh.
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Kottu
Kottu, also known as Koththu Rotti or Kothu Roti
Roti
(Sinhala: කොත්තුරොටි; Tamil: கொத்துரொட்டி; meaning chopped bread), is a Sri Lankan dish made from godhamba roti (a type of Sri Lankan roti) and vegetables, egg and/or meat, and spices.[1][2] The bread is described as similar to the type found in the south Indian kothu parotta and roti canai, with the former dish overall being very similar to the Koththu Rotti.[3] A common dinner dish,[4] kothu has become popular in cities with a significant Sri Lankan diaspora population, such as
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Dosa
Dosa
Dosa
is a type of pancake from the Indian subcontinent, made from a fermented batter. It is somewhat similar to a crepe in appearance. Its main ingredients are rice and black gram. Dosa
Dosa
is a typical part of the Southern Indian
Southern Indian
diet and popular all over the Indian subcontinent. Traditionally, Dosa
Dosa
is served hot along with sambar, stuffing of potatoes and chutney. It can be consumed with idli podi as well.Contents1 History 2 Names 3 Nutrition 4 Preparation 5 Serving 6 Variations6.1 Masala dosa7 Related foods 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Dosa
Dosa
is indigenous to South India; its exact birthplace in that region is a matter of conjecture.[1] According to food historian K
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Mie Goreng
Mie goreng
Mie goreng
(Indonesian: mie goreng or mi goreng; Malay: mee goreng or mi goreng; both meaning "fried noodles"[3]), also known as bakmi goreng,[4] is a flavourful and spicy fried noodle dish common in Indonesia,[1][5] Malaysia, Brunei Darussalam, and Singapore. It is made with thin yellow noodles fried in cooking oil with garlic, onion or shallots, fried prawn, chicken, beef, or sliced bakso (meatballs), chili, Chinese cabbage, cabbages, tomatoes, egg, and other vegetables. Ubiquitous in Indonesia, it can be found everywhere in the country, sold by all food vendors from street-hawkers, warungs, to high-end restaurants. It is an Indonesian one-dish meal favourite, although street food hawkers commonly sell it together with nasi goreng (fried rice).[6] It is commonly available at Mamak stalls
Mamak stalls
in Singapore, Brunei Darussalam, and Malaysia
Malaysia
and is often spicy
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Satay
Satay
Satay
(/ˈsæteɪ/ SA-tay, /ˈsɑːteɪ/ SAH-tay), or sate in Indonesian spelling, is a Southeast Asian dish of seasoned, skewered and grilled meat, served with a sauce.[3] It is a dish from Indonesia, and popular in Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, and Brunei.[4] Satay
Satay
may consist of diced or sliced chicken, goat, mutton, beef, pork, fish, other meats, or tofu; the more authentic version uses skewers from the midrib of the coconut palm frond, although bamboo skewers are often used. These are grilled or barbecued over a wood or charcoal fire, then served with various spicy seasonings
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Idiyappam
Idiyappam(Malayalam: ഇടിയപ്പം,നൂൽപ്പുട്ട്)(Tamil: இடியாப்ப‌ம், also known as Semige or Semé da Addae in Tulu, Shavige (Kannada: ಶಾವಿಗೆ), Nooputt or Noolputtu (Kodava: ನೋಲ್ ಪೂಟ್ಟ್), "Irmandappa" in Beary, Putumayam (in Malay), and string hoppers in English, is a traditional Sri Lankan and South Indian food consisting of rice flour pressed into noodle form and then steamed. Putu mayam
Putu mayam
in Malay or Idiyappam
Idiyappam
(இடியாப்ப‌ம்) in Tamil is a Tamil dish from southern India. It is popular in southern India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Singapore. The process for making putu mayam (also known as string hoppers in English) consists of mixing rice flour or idiyappam flour with water and/or coconut milk, and pressing the dough through a sieve to make vermicelli-like noodles
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Upma
Upma, uppumavu or uppittu is a dish from the Indian subcontinent, most common in South Indian,[1] Maharashtrian, and Sri Lankan Tamil breakfast; cooked as a thick porridge from dry roasted semolina or coarse rice flour.[2] Various seasonings and/or vegetables are often added during the cooking, depending on individual preferences. Today it is popular in most parts of India
India
and is prepared in various ways.Contents1 Etymology 2 Preparation2.1 Ingredients 2.2 Method of preparation3 Major variations3.1 Sooji upma 3.2 Whole wheat upma 3.3 Rice
Rice
upma 3.4 Corn upma 3.5 Kesari bath 3.6 Aval upma / Atukulu upma 3.7 Vermicelli
Vermicelli
upma 3.8 Upma
Upma
served with ghugni4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] In many Dravidian languages, the word uppu means salt and pindi, mavu or hittu means flour, hence the name uppindi, uppumavu or uppittu
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Curry
Curry
Curry
(/ˈkʌri/, plural curries) is an umbrella term referring to a number of dishes originating in the cuisine of the Indian subcontinent. The common feature is the use of complex combinations of spices or herbs, usually including fresh or dried hot chillies. The use of the term is generally limited to dishes prepared in a sauce.[1] Curry
Curry
dishes prepared in the southern states of India
India
may be spiced with leaves from the curry tree.[2] There are many varieties of dishes called 'curries'. For example, in original traditional cuisines, the precise selection of spices for each dish is a matter of national or regional cultural tradition, religious practice, and, to some extent, family preference
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Chicken Curry
Chicken curry
Chicken curry
is a common delicacy in the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, as well as in the Caribbean
Caribbean
(specifically Trinidad, where it is usually referred to as curry chicken). A typical curry from the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
consists of chicken stewed in an onion- and tomato-based sauce, flavored with ginger, garlic, mango chutney, tomato puree, chili peppers and a variety of spices, often including turmeric, cumin, coriander, cinnamon, cardamom and so on
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Imbul Kiribath
Imbul Kiribath
Kiribath
(ඉඹුල් කිරිබත්) is a Sinhala traditional food which is a derivation of Kiribath
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Kakuluwo Curry
Kakuluwo Curry
Curry
is a traditional spicy Sri Lankan crab curry,[1] also known as Jaffna
Jaffna
Crab
Crab
Curry. The dish originated in the northern regions of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
but is popular around the country, mostly in the seaboard areas where fish and other seafood are staple foods. The dish is served with rice, pittu or bread.Contents1 Preparation 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksPreparation[edit] The dish typically uses either blue swimmer or mud crabs, which are cleaned, removing the gills and fibrous membranes then broken into smaller portions. Onion, garlic, ginger, fenugreek seeds, curry leaves, cinnamon, chilli, turmeric, salt and coconut milk are mixed in a claypot and allowed to simmer over medium-low heat
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