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Luigi Gabrielli
Luigi Cante Gabrielli-Quercita (1790–1854) was an Italian soldier and military writer.Contents1 Life 2 Works2.1 Military essays 2.2 Poems 2.3 Tragedies3 BibliographyLife[edit]Frontispice of the second Italian edition of the Guida dell'Uffiziale in Campagna (1829)Born in Naples
Naples
to a family originally from Gubbio, Luigi was the son of Antonio Gabrielli, a nobleman of progressive ideas who in 1799 had supported the Parthenopean Republic
Parthenopean Republic
against the Bourbon kings. In 1809, at the age of 19, Luigi enlisted in the army and served under Joachim Murat, the newly appointed king of the Two Sicilies, until 1815, when Ferdinand I was restored. As king Ferdinand acknowledged that some of the military reforms introduced by king Joachim were worth of being maintained, upon accession he decided not to disband the Army and offered many officers the possibility to remain and keep the same rank
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Naples
Naples
Naples
(/ˈneɪpəlz/; Italian: Napoli [ˈnaːpoli] ( listen), Neapolitan: Napule [ˈnɑːpələ] or [ˈnɑːpulə]; Latin: Neapolis; Ancient Greek: Νεάπολις, meaning "new city") is the capital of the Italian region Campania
Campania
and the third-largest municipality in Italy
Italy
after Rome
Rome
and Milan. In 2017, around 967,069 people lived within the city's administrative limits. The Metropolitan City of Naples
Metropolitan City of Naples
had a population of 3,115,320
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Guillaume Philibert Duhesme
Guillaume
Guillaume
may refer to: People[edit] Guillaume
Guillaume
(given name), the French equivalent of William Guillaume
Guillaume
(surname)This section lists people commonly referred to solely by this name. William the Conqueror
William the Conqueror
(c
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Richard Church (general)
Sir Richard Church CB, GCH (Greek: Ριχάρδος/Ρίτσαρντ Τσούρτς/Τσωρτς[1][2]; 23 February 1784 – 20 March 1873),[Notes 1] was an Irish military officer in the British Army
British Army
and commander of the Greek forces during the last stages of the Greek War of Independence after 1827. After Greek independence, he became a general in the Greek army and a member of the Greek Senate.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Role in the Greek War of Independence 3 Role in independent Greece 4 Family 5 Death 6 Notes 7 Sources 8 ReferencesEarly life and career[edit] He was the second son Matthew Church, a Quaker
Quaker
merchant in the North Mall area of Cork, and Anne Dearman, originally from Braithwaith, Yorkshire.[3] At the age of sixteen he ran away from home and enlisted in the British Army
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General Officer
A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.[1] The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer and as a specific rank. It originates in the 16th century, as a shortening of captain general, which rank was taken from Middle French capitaine général. The adjective general had been affixed to officer designations since the late medieval period to indicate relative superiority or an extended jurisdiction. Today, the title of "General" is known in some countries as a four-star rank. However different countries use different systems of stars for senior ranks
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First Edition
The bibliographical definition of an edition includes all copies of a book printed “from substantially the same setting of type,” including all minor typographical variants. The numbering of book editions is a special case of the wider field of revision control. The traditional conventions for numbering book editions evolved spontaneously for several centuries before any greater applied science of revision control became important to humanity, which did not occur until the era of widespread computing had arrived (when software and electronic publishing came into existence)
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Colonel
Colonel
Colonel
(abbreviated Col., Col or COL and pronounced /ˈkɜːrnəl/, similar to "kernel") is a senior military officer rank below the general officer ranks. However, in some small military forces, such as those of Iceland
Iceland
or the Vatican, colonel is the highest rank. It is also used in some police forces and paramilitary organizations. Historically, in the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a colonel was typically in charge of a regiment in an army. Modern usage varies greatly, and in some cases the term is used as an honorific title that may have no direct relationship to military service. The rank of colonel is typically above the rank of lieutenant colonel. The rank above colonel is typically called brigadier, brigade general or brigadier general. Equivalent naval ranks may be called captain or ship-of-the-line captain
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Cholera
Cholera
Cholera
is an infection of the small intestine by some strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.[3][2] Symptoms may range from none, to mild, to severe.[2] The classic symptom is large amounts of watery diarrhea that lasts a few days.[1] Vomiting
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Sicily
Sicily
Sicily
(/ˈsɪsɪli/ SISS-i-lee; Italian: Sicilia [siˈtʃiːlja], Sicilian: Sicìlia) is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. It is an autonomous region of Italy, in Southern Italy
Italy
along with surrounding minor islands, officially referred to as Regione Siciliana. Sicily
Sicily
is located in the central Mediterranean Sea, south of the Italian Peninsula, from which it is separated by the narrow Strait of Messina. Its most prominent landmark is Mount Etna, the tallest active volcano in Europe,[4] and one of the most active in the world, currently 3,329 m (10,922 ft) high
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Palermo
Palermo
Palermo
(Italian: [paˈlɛrmo] ( listen), Sicilian: Palermu, Latin: Panormus, from Greek: Πάνορμος, Panormos) is a city of Southern Italy, the capital of both the autonomous region of Sicily
Sicily
and the Metropolitan City of Palermo. The city is noted for its history, culture, architecture and gastronomy, playing an important role throughout much of its existence; it is over 2,700 years old. Palermo
Palermo
is located in the northwest of the island of Sicily, right by the Gulf of Palermo
Palermo
in the Tyrrhenian Sea. The city was founded in 734 BC by the Phoenicians
Phoenicians
as Ziz ('flower')
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Jacques-Antoine-Hippolyte De Guibert
Jacques-Antoine-Hippolyte, Comte de Guibert (12 November 1743 – 6 May 1790) was a French general and military writer
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Jean-Gérard Lacuée, Count Of Cessac
Jean-Girard Lacuée, count of Cessac
Cessac
(château de Lamassas),[1] near Hautefage-la-Tour
Hautefage-la-Tour
in the arrondissement of Agen, 4 November 1752 - Paris, 18 June 1841) was a French general and politician, peer of France
France
and Minister for War under Napoleon
Napoleon
I of France. His name is inscribed on the south side (column 18) of the Arc de Triomphe.Contents1 Life 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Lacuée was born near Agen
Agen
in 1752. He became a member of the Institute, minister of state in 1807, and minister of the administration of war in 1810. He died in 1841.[2] Notes[edit]^ Castle of Lamassas on Napoleon
Napoleon
& Empire website ^ Thomas 1892, p. 1351.References[edit]Mullié, Charles (1852). "Lacuée (Jean-Gérard)"
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Ottoman Empire
The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Devlet-i ʿAlīye-i ʿOsmānīye[dn 5]), also historically known in Western Europe
Europe
as the Turkish Empire[8] or simply Turkey,[9] was a state that controlled much of southeastern Europe, western Asia and northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia
Anatolia
in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman.[10] After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman Beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire
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Greek War Of Independence
Greek independenceEstablishment of the First Hellenic Republic
First Hellenic Republic
(1822–1832) London Protocol Treaty of Constantinople Establishment of the Kingdom of Greece
G

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Philhellenism
Philhellenism ("the love of Greek culture") and philhellene ("the admirer of Greeks and everything Greek"), from the Greek φίλος philos "friend, lover" and ἑλληνισμός hellenism "Greek", was an intellectual fashion prominent mostly at the turn of the 19th century. It contributed to the sentiments that led Europeans such as Lord Byron or Charles Nicolas Fabvier to advocate for Greek independence from the Ottoman Empire. The later 19th-century European Philhellenism was largely to be found among the Classicists.Contents1 Philhellenes in antiquity1.1 Roman philhellenes2 Modern times2.1 Philhellenism and art3 Philhellenism in the Greek War of Independence 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksPhilhellenes in antiquity[edit]Coin of Mithridates II of Parthia from the mint at Seleucia on the Tigris
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