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Luas
Luas
Luas
(Irish pronunciation: [ˈl̪ˠuəsˠ]; Irish for "speed") is a tram/light rail system in Dublin, Ireland, which in 2017 carried 37.6 million passengers,[2] an increase in 10% compared to 2016.[1][3] There are two main lines: The Green Line, which began operating on 30 June 2004, and the Red Line which opened on 26 September 2004. Since then, both lines have been extended and split into different branches. The system now has fifty-four stations and 36.5 kilometres (22.7 mi) of revenue track.[1] Luas
Luas
is operated by Transdev, under tender from Transport Infrastructure Ireland (TII). It was a major part of the National Transport Authority's strategy (2000–2016).[4] Three extensions to the existing Luas
Luas
lines have been completed
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River Liffey
The River Liffey
River Liffey
(Irish: An Life) is a river in Ireland, which flows through the centre of Dublin. Its major tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle
River Poddle
and the River Camac. The river supplies much of Dublin's water and a range of recreational activities.[1]Contents1 Name 2 Course and system2.1 Tributaries 2.2 Dams, reservoirs and falls 2.3 Settlements3 Navigation and uses3.1 Water supply 3.2 Electricity generation 3.3 Traffic 3.4 Recreational use4 Crossings4.1 History 4.2 Present day5 Quays 6 Incidents 7 Annalistic references 8 Popular culture references 9 See also 10 ReferencesName[edit] Ptolemy's Geography (2nd century AD) described a river, perhaps the Liffey, which he labelled Οβοκα (Oboka)
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Volt
The volt (symbol: V) is the derived unit for electric potential, electric potential difference (voltage), and electromotive force.[1] It is named after the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta (1745–1827).Contents1 Definition1.1 Josephson junction definition2 Water-flow analogy 3 Common voltages 4 History 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDefinition[edit] One volt is defined as the difference in electric potential between two points of a conducting wire when an electric current of one ampere dissipates one watt of power between those points.[2] It is also equal to the potential difference between two parallel, infinite planes spaced 1 meter apart that create an electric field of 1 newton per coulomb. Additionally, it is the potential difference between two points that will impart one joule of energy per coulomb of charge that passes through it
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Subvention
A subsidy is a form of financial aid or support extended to an economic sector (or institution, business, or individual) generally with the aim of promoting economic and social policy.[1] Although commonly extended from government, the term subsidy can relate to any type of support – for example from NGOs or as implicit subsidies. Subsidies come in various forms including: direct (cash grants, interest-free loans) and indirect (tax breaks, insurance, low-interest loans, accelerated depreciation, rent rebates).[2][3] Furthermore, they can be broad or narrow, legal or illegal, ethical or unethical. The most common forms of subsidies are those to the producer or the consumer. Producer/production subsidies ensure producers are better off by either supplying market price support, direct support, or payments to factors of production.[4] Consumer/consumption subsidies commonly reduce the price of goods and services to the consumer
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National College Of Ireland
National College of Ireland (NCI) or Coláiste Náisiúnta na hÉireann (CNÉ) in Irish is a third-level education college in Dublin. Founded in 1951, it offers full and part-time courses from certificate to degree and postgraduate level in areas related to computing, business, and psychology. All courses are delivered from the IFSC campus in Dublin
Dublin
and across a network of regional centres. The College's specialist areas include human resource management, data analytics, management, cloud computing, fintech, accountancy, cybersecurity, education, and finance
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Bus
A bus (archaically also omnibus,[1] multibus, motorbus, autobus) is a road vehicle designed to carry many passengers. Buses can have a capacity as high as 300 passengers.[2] The most common type of bus is the single-decker rigid bus, with larger loads carried by double-decker and articulated buses, and smaller loads carried by midibuses and minibuses; coaches are used for longer-distance services. Many types of buses, such as city transit buses and inter-city coaches, charge a fare. Other types, such as elementary or secondary school buses or shuttle buses within a post-secondary education campus do not charge a fare
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Irish Language
The Irish language
Irish language
(Gaeilge), also referred to as the Gaelic or the Irish Gaelic language,[5] is a Goidelic
Goidelic
language (Gaelic) of the Indo-European language family originating in Ireland
Ireland
and historically spoken by the Irish people. Irish is spoken as a first language by a small minority of Irish people, and as a second language by a larger group of non-native speakers. Irish has been the predominant language of the Irish people
Irish people
for most of their recorded history, and they have brought it with them to other regions, notably Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man, where Middle Irish gave rise to Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
and Manx respectively
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Overhead Line
An overhead line or overhead wire is used to transmit electrical energy to trams, trolleybuses or trains. It is known variously as:Overhead contact system (OCS) Overhead line
Overhead line
equipment (OLE or OHLE) Overhead equipment (OHE) Overhead wiring (OHW) or overhead lines (OHL) Catenary Trolley wire Traction wireIn this article, the generic term overhead line is used, as used by the International Union of Railways.[1] An overhead line is designed on the principle of one or more overhead wires (or rails, particularly in tunnels) situated over rail tracks, raised to a high electrical potential by connection to feeder stations at regular intervals
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Direct Current
Direct current
Direct current
(DC) is the unidirectional flow of electric charge. A battery is a good example of a DC power supply. Direct current
Direct current
may flow in a conductor such as a wire, but can also flow through semiconductors, insulators, or even through a vacuum as in electron or ion beams. The electric current flows in a constant direction, distinguishing it from alternating current (AC). A term formerly used for this type of current was galvanic current.[1] The abbreviations AC and DC are often used to mean simply alternating and direct, as when they modify current or voltage.[2][3] Direct current
Direct current
may be obtained from an alternating current supply by use of a rectifier, which contains electronic elements (usually) or electromechanical elements (historically) that allow current to flow only in one direction
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Railway Electrification System
A railway electrification system supplies electric power to railway trains and trams without an on-board prime mover or local fuel supply. Electric railways use electric locomotives to haul passengers or freight in separate cars or electric multiple units, passenger cars with their own motors. Electricity is typically generated in large and relatively efficient generating stations, transmitted to the railway network and distributed to the trains. Some electric railways have their own dedicated generating stations and transmission lines but most purchase power from an electric utility. The railway usually provides its own distribution lines, switches and transformers. Power is supplied to moving trains with a (nearly) continuous conductor running along the track that usually takes one of two forms: overhead line, suspended from poles or towers along the track or from structure or tunnel ceilings; third rail mounted at track level and contacted by a sliding "pickup shoe"
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Gio. Ansaldo & C.
Ansaldo was one of Italy's oldest and most important engineering companies, existing for 140 years from 1853 to 1993.Contents1 From foundation to World War I 2 Fascism and World War II 3 After World War II 4 Ansaldo today 5 Products5.1 Aircraft production 5.2 Ships 5.3 Rolling stock5.3.1 Locomotives6 See also 7 References 8 External linksFrom foundation to World War I[edit]Ansaldo logoGiovanni Ansaldo, 1853Launch of Italian battleship Giulio Cesare
Italian battleship Giulio Cesare
1911 Sestri Ponente, GenovaThe company was founded in 1853 as Gio. Ansaldo & C. S.A.S
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Cathal Brugha Street
Cathal Brugha Street (/ˌkɒhəl ˈbruːə/ Irish: Sráid Chathal Brugha) is a street on the northside of Dublin, Ireland.Contents1 Location 2 Creation and name 3 Landmarks 4 References 5 External linksLocation[edit] The street runs eastwards from near the Parnell Square end of Upper O'Connell Street, crossing Marlborough Street and changing name to Seán Macdermott Street Upper at the junction with Cumberland Street North and Champions Avenue.[1] Creation and name[edit] The original Cathal Brugha Street was the section west of Marlborough Street, which was created as part of the reconstruction of Dublin after the damage of the Irish revolutionary period of 1916–23, which destroyed much of the vicinity.[2] The pre-existing Findlater Place (originally Gregg's Lane[3][4]) ran at an angle between O'Connell Street and Marlborough Street, to the north of St
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Track Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t ePart of a series onRail transportOperations Track Maintenance High-speed railways Track gauge Stations Trains Locomotives Rolling stock Companies History Attractions Terminology (AU, NA, NZ, UK) By country Accidents Railway couplings Couplers by country Coupler conversion Track gauge Variable gauge Gauge conversion Dual gauge Wheelset Bogie
Bogie
(truck) Dual coupling Rail subsidiesModellingv t eIn rail transport, track gauge is the spacing of the rails on a railway track and is measured between the inner faces of the load-bearing rails. All vehicles on a rail network must have running gear that is compatible with the track gauge, and in the earliest days of railways the selection of a proposed railway's gauge was a key issue
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Grangegorman
Grangegorman (Irish: Gráinseach Ghormáin) is a suburb on the northside of Dublin city, Ireland. The area is administered by Dublin City Council. It was best known for decades as the location of St Brendan's Hospital, which was the main psychiatric hospital serving the greater Dublin region
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Maynooth
Maynooth
Maynooth
(/məˈnuːθ/; Irish: Maigh Nuad) is a university town in north County Kildare, Ireland
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Light Rail
Light rail, light rail transit (LRT), or fast tram is a form of urban rail transport using rolling stock similar to a tramway, but operating at a higher capacity, and often on an exclusive right-of-way.Utah Transit Authority's TRAX is one of the fastest growing light rail systems in the United States.With nearly a quarter million riders served each day, Boston's MBTA Green Line is the busiest light rail system in the United States.There is no standard definition, but in the United States
United States
(where the terminology was devised in the 1970s from the engineering term light railway), light r
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