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Lozisht
Ignatówka, also Lozisht,[1] was a Jewish shtetl (village) located in what is now western Ukraine
Ukraine
but which used to be part of the Second Polish Republic before the Nazi- Soviet invasion of Poland
Soviet invasion of Poland
in 1939. Ignatówka was bordering a Jewish shtetl in Zofjówka, located in the gmina Silno, powiat Łuck
Łuck
of the Wołyń Voivodeship, in prewar Poland.[2] The two villages were part of a joint Jewish community of Trochenbrod
Trochenbrod
and Lozisht.[1] Lozisht
Lozisht
and Trochenbrod
Trochenbrod
Jewery Holocaust memorial ( Holon
Holon
Cemetery, Israel)Ignatówka (Lozisht) was founded in 1838, and had grown to approximately 1,200 inhabitants by the beginning of World War II. Of those, only a few survived
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Stutthof Concentration Camp
Stutthof was a Nazi German
Nazi German
concentration camp established in a secluded, wet, and wooded area near the small town of Sztutowo (German: Stutthof) 34 km (21 mi) east of the city of Danzig in the former territory of the Free City of Danzig. The camp was set up around existing structures after the invasion of Poland in World War II, used for the imprisonment of Polish leaders and intelligentsia.[1][2] The actual barracks were built the following year by hundreds of prisoners.[3] Stutthof was the first Nazi concentration camp set up outside German borders in World War II, in operation from 2 September 1939
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Nazi Concentration Camps
Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
maintained concentration camps (German: Konzentrationslager, KZ or KL) throughout the territories it controlled before and during the Second World War
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The Holocaust In Belgium
The Holocaust
The Holocaust
in German-occupied Belgium refers to the persecution and attempted extermination of Jews
Jews
and Roma between 1940 and 1944 during World War II. At the start of the war, the population of Belgium was overwhelmingly Catholic. Jews
Jews
made up the largest non-Christian population in the country, numbering between 70–75,000 out of a population of 8 million. Most lived in the cities of Antwerp, Brussels, Charleroi
Charleroi
and Liège. The vast majority were recent immigrants to Belgium who had fled persecution in Germany and Eastern Europe, and, as a result, only a small minority actually possessed Belgian citizenship. Shortly after the invasion of Belgium, the Military Government passed a series of anti-Jewish laws in October 1940
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The Holocaust In The Independent State Of Croatia
The Holocaust
The Holocaust
in the Independent State of Croatia
Independent State of Croatia
refers primarily to the genocide of Jews, but sometimes also include that of Serbs
Serbs
(the " Genocide
Genocide
of the Serbs") and Romani (Porajmos), during World War II within the Independent State of Croatia, a fascist puppet state ruled by the Ustashe
Ustashe
regime, that included most of the territory of modern-day Croatia, the whole of modern-day Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
and the eastern part of Syrmia
Syrmia
(Serbia)
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Rescue Of The Danish Jews
The rescue of the Danish Jews occurred during Nazi Germany's occupation of Denmark during World War II. On October 1, 1943, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler
Adolf Hitler
ordered Danish Jews to be arrested and deported. The Danish resistance
Danish resistance
movement, with the assistance of many Danish citizens, managed to evacuate 7,220 of Denmark's 7,800 Jews, plus 686 non-Jewish spouses, by sea to nearby neutral Sweden.[1] Polish passport used in Denmark up to March 1940. The Jewish holder escaped to Sweden during the war. The rescue allowed the vast majority of Denmark's Jewish population to avoid capture by the Nazis and is considered to be one of the largest actions of collective resistance to aggression in the countries occupied by Nazi Germany
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The Holocaust In Estonia
The Holocaust
The Holocaust
in Estonia
Estonia
refers to the Nazi crimes during the occupation of Estonia
Estonia
by Nazi Germany. Prior to the war, there were approximately 4,300 Estonian Jews. After the Soviet 1940 occupation about 10% of the Jewish population was deported to Siberia, along with other Estonians. About 75% of Estonian Jews, aware of the fate that awaited them from Nazi Germany, escaped to the Soviet Union; virtually all of those who remained (between 950 and 1,000 people) were killed by Einsatzgruppe A
Einsatzgruppe A
and local collaborators before the end of 1941. Roma people of Estonia
Estonia
were also murdered and enslaved by the Nazi occupiers and their collaborators
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The Holocaust In France
The Holocaust
The Holocaust
in France
France
refers to the persecution, deportation, and annihilation of Jews
Jews
and Roma between 1940 and 1944 in occupied France, metropolitan Vichy
Vichy
France, and in Vichy-controlled French North Africa, during World War II. The persecution began in 1940, and culminated in deportations of Jews
Jews
from France
France
to Nazi concentration camps in Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
and Nazi-occupied Poland. The deportation started in 1942 and lasted until July 1944. Of the 340,000 Jews
Jews
living in metropolitan/continental France
France
in 1940, more than 75,000 were deported to death camps, where about 72,500 were killed
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The Holocaust In Latvia
The Holocaust
The Holocaust
in Latvia
Latvia
refers to the war crimes committed by Nazi Germany and collaborators victimizing Jews during the occupation of Latvia.Contents1 German
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The Holocaust In Lithuania
The Holocaust
The Holocaust
in German occupied Lithuania
Lithuania
resulted in the near total destruction of Lithuanian (Litvaks) and Polish Jews,[a] living in Generalbezirk Litauen of Reichskommissariat Ostland
Reichskommissariat Ostland
within the Nazi-controlled Lithuanian SSR. Out of approximately 208,000–210,000 Jews, an estimated 190,000–195,000 were murdered before the end of World War II
World War II
(wider estimates are sometimes published), most between June and December 1941. More than 95% of Lithuania's Jewish
Jewish
population was massacred over the three-year German occupation — a more complete destruction than befell any other country affected by the Holocaust
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The Holocaust In Norway
In 1941–1942[1] during the German occupation of Norway, there were at least 2,173 Jews in Norway. At least 775 of them were arrested, detained and/or deported
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The Holocaust In Russia
The Holocaust
The Holocaust
in Russia refers to the Nazi crimes during the occupation of Russia (Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic) by Nazi Germany..mw-parser-output .toclimit-2 .toclevel-1 ul,.mw-parser-output .toclimit-3 .toclevel-2 ul,.mw-parser-output .toclimit-4 .toclevel-3 ul,.mw-parser-output .toclimit-5 .toclevel-4 ul,.mw-parser-output .toclimit-6 .toclevel-5 ul,.mw-parser-output .toclimit-7 .toclevel-6 ul display:none Contents1 On the eve of the Holocaust 2 World War II 3 After World War II 4 Perpetrators and commanders 5 Executor units5.1 German security and police units 5.2 Volunteers in German armed forces 5.3 Collaborationist parties5.3.1 European front 5.3.2 Pacific front6 See also 7 ReferencesOn the eve of the Holocaust[edit] Russia. Jewish women and children being forced out of their homes
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The Holocaust In Ukraine
The Holocaust
The Holocaust
in Ukraine
Ukraine
took place in Reichskommissariat Ukraine during the occupation of the Soviet Ukraine
Soviet Ukraine
by Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
in World War II.[5] Between 1941 and 1944 more than a million Jews living in Ukrainian SSR
Ukrainian SSR
were murdered as part of Generalplan Ost
Generalplan Ost
and the Final Solution
Final Solution
extermination policies. According to Yale historian Timothy D
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Extermination Camp
Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
built extermination camps (also called death camps or killing centers) during the Holocaust in World War II, to systematically murder millions of Jews. Others were murdered at the death camps as well, including Poles, Soviet POWs, and Roma
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The Holocaust In Poland
The Holocaust
Holocaust
in Poland was part of the European-wide Holocaust
Holocaust
and took place within the September 1, 1939, boundaries of Poland, which ceased to exist as a territorial entity after the German and Soviet invasions of Poland. The Holocaust
Holocaust
in Poland was marked by the construction of death camps by Nazi Germany, German use of gas vans, and mass shootings by German troops and their Ukrainian and Lithuanian auxiliaries. The genocide took the lives of three million Polish Jews,[4] half of all Jews killed during the Holocaust. The extermination camps played a central role in Germany's systematic murder of over 90% of Poland's Jewish population,[8] and of Jews whom Germany transported to their deaths from western and southern Europe
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Auschwitz Concentration Camp
The Auschwitz
Auschwitz
concentration camp (Konzentrationslager Auschwitz) was a complex of over 40 concentration and extermination camps built and operated by Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
in occupied Poland during World War II
World War II
and the Holocaust
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