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Lower East Side
The Lower East Side, sometimes abbreviated as LES, is a neighborhood in the southeastern part of the New York City
New York City
borough of Manhattan, roughly located between the Bowery
Bowery
and the East River, and Canal Street and Houston Street
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Loyalist (American Revolution)
Loyalists were American colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War. At the time they were often called Tories, Royalists, or King's Men. They were opposed by the Patriots, those who supported the revolution and called them "persons inimical to the liberties of America".[1] Prominent Loyalists repeatedly assured the British government that many thousands of loyalists would spring to arms and fight for the crown. The British government acted in expectation of that, especially in the southern campaigns in 1780-81. In practice, the number of loyalists in military service was far lower than expected. Across the colonies, Patriots watched suspected Loyalists very closely, and would not tolerate any organized Loyalist opposition. Many outspoken or militarily active loyalists were forced to flee, especially to their stronghold of New York City
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Boston Post Road
The Boston
Boston
Post Road
Road
was a system of mail-delivery routes between New York City and Boston, Massachusetts
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New Amsterdam
New Amsterdam
New Amsterdam
(Dutch: Nieuw Amsterdam) was a 17th-century Dutch settlement established at the southern tip of Manhattan Island
Manhattan Island
that served as the seat of the colonial government in New Netherland. The factorij became a settlement outside Fort Amsterdam. The fort was situated on the strategic southern tip of the island of Manhattan and was meant to defend the fur trade operations of the Dutch West India Company in the North River (Hudson River). In 1624, it became a provincial extension of the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
and was designated as the capital of the province in 1625. By 1655, the population of New Netherland
New Netherland
had grown to 2,000 people, with 1,500 living in New Amsterdam
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Lenape
The Lenape
Lenape
(English: /ləˈnɑːpi/ or /ˈlɛnəpi/),[8] also called the Leni Lenape,[9] Lenni Lenape
Lenape
and Delaware
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New York State Senate
Majority caucus (32)     Republican (31)      Democrat Caucusing with Republicans (1)Minority caucus (29)     Democratic (29)Vacant (2)     Vacant (2)Length of term2 yearsAuthority Article III, New York ConstitutionSalary $79,500/year + per diemElectionsLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Redistricting Legislative ControlMeeting placeState Senate Chamber New York State Capitol Albany, New YorkWebsiteNYSenate.govThe New York State Senate
New York State Senate
is the upper house of the New York State Legislature, the New York State Assembly
New York State Assembly
being the lower house. It has 63 members each elected to two-year terms.[1] There are no limits on the number of terms one may serve
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New York State Assembly
Majority caucus (104)     Democratic (103)      Independence (1)Minority caucus (37)     Republican (37)Vacant (9)     Vacant (9)Length of term2 yearsAuthority Article III, New York ConstitutionSalary $79,500/year + per diemElectionsLast electionNovember 8, 2016 (150 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (150 seats)Redistricting Legislative ControlMeeting placeState Assembly Chamber New York State Capitol Albany, New YorkWebsiteNew York State AssemblyThe New York State Assembly
New York State Assembly
is the lower house of the New York State Legislature, the New York State Senate
New York State Senate
being the upper house. There are 150 seats in the Assembly, with each of the 150 Assembly districts having an average population of 128,652
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Latino
Latino
Latino
(/læˈtiːnoʊ, lə-/)[1] is a term often used in the United States to refer to people with cultural ties to Latin
Latin
America, in contrast to Hispanic
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Manhattan Bridge
The Manhattan Bridge is a suspension bridge that crosses the East River in New York City, connecting Lower Manhattan at Canal Street with Downtown Brooklyn at the Flatbush Avenue Extension. The main span is 1,470 ft (448 m) long, with the suspension cables being 3,224 ft (983 m) long. The bridge's total length is 6,855 ft (2,089 m). It is one of four toll-free bridges spanning the East River; the other three are the Queensboro, Williamsburg, and Brooklyn Bridges. The bridge opened to traffic on December 31, 1909. It was designed by Leon Moisseiff,[2] and is noted for its innovative design. As the first suspension bridge to employ Josef Melan's deflection theory for the stiffening of its deck, it is considered to be the forerunner of modern suspension bridges, and this design served as the model for many of the long-span suspension bridges built in the first half of the twentieth century
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Historic Districts In The United States
In the United States, a historic district is a group of buildings, properties, or sites that have been designated by one of several entities on different levels as historically or architecturally significant. Buildings, structures, objects and sites within a historic district are normally divided into two categories, contributing and non-contributing. Districts greatly vary in size: some have hundreds of structures, while others have just a few. The U.S. federal government designates historic districts through the United States
United States
Department of Interior under the auspices of the National Park Service. Federally designated historic districts are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, but listing usually imposes no restrictions on what property owners may do with a designated property. State-level historic districts may follow similar criteria (no restrictions) or may require adherence to certain historic rehabilitation standards
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Working Class
The working class (also labouring class and proletariat) are the people employed for wages, especially in manual-labour occupations and industrial work.[1] Working-class occupations include blue-collar jobs, some white-collar jobs, and most pink-collar jobs
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Borough (New York City)
New York City
New York City
encompasses five different county-level administrative divisions called boroughs: Manhattan, the Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn, and Staten Island. All boroughs are part of New York City, and each of the boroughs is coextensive with a respective county, the primary administrative subdivision within New York State. The Bronx
The Bronx
and Queens are concurrent with the counties of the same name, while Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Staten Island
Staten Island
correspond to New York, Kings, and Richmond Counties respectively. Boroughs have existed since the consolidation of the city in 1898, when the city and each borough assumed their current boundaries. However, the boroughs have not always been coextensive with their respective counties
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Neighborhood
A neighbourhood (British English), or neighborhood (American English; see spelling differences), is a geographically localised community within a larger city, town, suburb or rural area. Neighbourhoods are often social communities with considerable face-to-face interaction among members. Researchers have not agreed on an exact definition, but the following may serve as a starting point: " Neighbourhood
Neighbourhood
is generally defined spatially as a specific geographic area and functionally as a set of social networks
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American Revolution
The American Revolution
Revolution
was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783. The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
won independence from Great Britain, becoming the United States
United States
of America. They defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War in alliance with France and others. Members of American colonial society argued the position of "no taxation without representation", starting with the Stamp Act Congress in 1765. They rejected the authority of the British Parliament to tax them because they lacked members in that governing body
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