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Los Angeles Philharmonic
The Los Angeles Philharmonic
Los Angeles Philharmonic
(LA Phil or LAP) is an American orchestra based in Los Angeles, California, United States. It has a regular season of concerts from October through June at the Walt Disney Concert Hall, and a summer season at the Hollywood Bowl
Hollywood Bowl
from July through September. Gustavo Dudamel
Gustavo Dudamel
is the current Music Director, and Esa-Pekka Salonen
Esa-Pekka Salonen
is Conductor Laureate. Music critics have described the orchestra as the most "contemporary minded",[1] "forward thinking",[2] "talked about and innovative",[3] "venturesome and admired"[4] orchestra in America. According to Salonen, "We are interested in the future
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Orchestra
An orchestra (/ˈɔːrkɪstrə/ or US: /ˈɔːrˌkɛstrə/; Italian: [orˈkɛstra]) is a large instrumental ensemble typical of classical music, which mixes instruments from different families, including bowed string instruments such as violin, viola, cello and double bass, as well as brass, woodwinds, and percussion instruments, each grouped in sections. Other instruments such as the piano and celesta may sometimes appear in a fifth keyboard section or may stand alone, as may the concert harp and, for performances of some modern compositions, electronic instruments. The term orchestra derives from the Greek ὀρχήστρα (orchestra), the name for the area in front of a stage in ancient Greek theatre reserved for the Greek chorus.[1] A full-size orchestra may sometimes be called a symphony orchestra or philharmonic orchestra
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Théâtre Du Châtelet
The Théâtre du Châtelet
Théâtre du Châtelet
(French pronunciation: ​[teɑtʁ dy ʃatlɛ]) is a theatre and opera house, located in the place du Châtelet in the 1st arrondissement of Paris, France. One of two theatres (the other being the Théâtre de la Ville) built on the site of a châtelet, a small castle or fortress, it was designed by Gabriel Davioud
Gabriel Davioud
at the request of Baron Haussmann
Baron Haussmann
between 1860 and 1862. Originally built with 3,000 seats, it was named the Théâtre Impérial du Châtelet, but has undergone remodeling and name changes over the years. Currently it seats 2,500 people.Contents1 Origins 2 Recent history 3 References 4 External linksOrigins[edit]The theatre ca. 1875The theatre is one of two apparent twins constructed along the quays of the Seine, facing each other across the open Place du Châtelet and its ornate fountain
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Cologne
Cologne
Cologne
(English: /kəˈloʊn/; German: Köln, pronounced [kœln] ( listen), Ripuarian: Kölle [ˈkœɫə] ( listen)) is the largest city in the German federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia
North Rhine-Westphalia
and the fourth most populated city in Germany
Germany
(after Berlin, Hamburg, and Munich). It is located within the Rhine-Ruhr
Rhine-Ruhr
metropolitan region which is Germany's largest and one of Europe's major metropolitan areas. Cologne
Cologne
is about 45 kilometres (28 mi) southwest of North Rhine-Westphalia's capital of Dusseldorf
Dusseldorf
and 25 kilometres (16 mi) northwest of Bonn. Cologne
Cologne
is located on both sides of the Rhine, near Germany's borders with Belgium
Belgium
and the Netherlands
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The Proms
The Proms, more formally known as the Henry Wood
Henry Wood
Promenade Concerts presented by the BBC, is an eight-week summer season of daily orchestral classical music concerts and other events held annually, predominantly in the Royal Albert Hall
Royal Albert Hall
in central London, England, UK. Founded in 1895, seasons now consist of concerts in Albert Hall, chamber music concerts at Cadogan Hall, additional Proms in the Park events across the UK on the Last Night of the Proms, and associated educational and children's events. The season is a significant event in British culture. In classical music, Jiří Bělohlávek
Jiří Bělohlávek
described the Proms as "the world's largest and most democratic musical festival".[1] Prom is short for promenade concert, a term which originally referred to outdoor concerts in London's pleasure gardens, where the audience was free to stroll around while the orchestra was playing
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Lucerne Festival
The Lucerne
Lucerne
Festival is a series of classical music festivals based in Lucerne, Switzerland.[1][2] Founded in 1938, it currently produces three festivals per year, attracting some 110,000 visitors annually[3] taking place since 2004 primarily at the Lucerne
Lucerne
Culture and Congress Centre (KKL) designed by Jean Nouvel.[4] Each festival features resident orchestras and soloists alongside guest performances from international ensembles and artists, in 2017 including the Berlin Philharmonic, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Vienna Philharmonic, Emanuel Ax, Martha Argerich
Martha Argerich
and Maxim Vengerov. The largest festival is the Summer Festival ( Lucerne
Lucerne
Festival im Sommer), taking place in August und September and featuring over 100 events
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Olivier Messiaen
Olivier Eugène Charles Prosper Messiaen (French: [ɔlivje mɛsjɑ̃]; December 10, 1908 – April 27, 1992) was a French composer, organist, and ornithologist, one of the major composers of the 20th century. His music is rhythmically complex; harmonically and melodically he employs a system he called modes of limited transposition, which he abstracted from the systems of material generated by his early compositions and improvisations. He wrote music for chamber ensembles and orchestra, vocal music, as well as for solo organ and piano, and also experimented with the use of novel electronic instruments developed in Europe during his lifetime. He travelled widely and wrote works inspired by diverse influences ranging from Japanese music, the landscape of Bryce Canyon in Utah
Utah
and the life of St. Francis of Assisi
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Salzburg Festival
The Salzburg
Salzburg
Festival
Festival
(German: Salzburger Festspiele) is a prominent festival of music and drama established in 1920. It is held each summer (for five weeks starting in late July) within the Austrian town of Salzburg, the birthplace of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
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Cleveland Institute Of Music
The Cleveland
Cleveland
Institute of Music is an independent, international music conservatory located in the University Circle
University Circle
district of Cleveland, Ohio, United States. It is led by President Paul Hogle. The Institute was founded in 1920, with the composer Ernest Bloch
Ernest Bloch
as director. Annual enrollment at the conservatory (including new and returning students) is between 400 and 450 students[2] with approximately 1,500 students enrolled in the preparatory and continuing education programs at any given time. Between 1,000 and 1,200 prospective students apply to the conservatory annually for the (approximately) 150 openings available for fall enrollment
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Concertgebouw Orchestra
The Royal Concertgebouw
Concertgebouw
Orchestra
Orchestra
(Dutch: Koninklijk Concertgebouworkest, pronounced [ˌkoːnɪnklək kɔnˈsɛrtxəbʌu̯ɔrˌkɛst]) is a symphony orchestra in the Netherlands, based at the Amsterdam
Amsterdam
Royal Concertgebouw
Concertgebouw
(concert hall). In 1988, Queen Beatrix conferred the "Royal" title upon the orchestra. It is considered one of the world's leading orchestras.[1]Contents1 History1.1 1888–1945: Kes and Mengelberg 1.2 1945–1988: Van Beinum and Haitink 1.3 1988–current: Chailly, Jansons and Gatti2 Character 3 Chief conductors 4 Current orchestra members 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Concertgebouw
Concertgebouw
opened on 11 April 1888
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Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California
Los Angeles, California
since 1881
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Arthur Rubinstein
Arthur Rubinstein
Arthur Rubinstein
(Polish: Artur Rubinstein; 28 January 1887 – 20 December 1982) was a Polish American[1] classical pianist
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Arturo Toscanini
Arturo Toscanini
Toscanini
(Italian: [arˈtuːro toskaˈniːni]; March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian conductor. He was one of the most acclaimed musicians of the late 19th and of the 20th century, renowned for his intensity, his perfectionism, his ear for orchestral detail and sonority, and his eidetic memory.[1] He was at various times the music director of La Scala
La Scala
in Milan, the Metropolitan Opera in New York, and the New York Philharmonic. Later in his career he was appointed the first music director of the NBC Symphony Orchestra (1937–54), and this led to his becoming a household name (especially in the United States) through his radio and television broadcasts and many recordings of the operatic and symphonic repertoire
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New York Philharmonic
The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc.,[1] globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra
Orchestra
(NYPO)[2][3][4][5] or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra,[6][7] is a symphony orchestra based in New York City
New York City
in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the "Big Five".[8] The Philharmonic's home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York's Lincoln Center
Lincoln Center
for the Performing Arts.[9] Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the "Big Five" orchestras
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Symphony In Three Movements
The Symphony in Three Movements
Symphony in Three Movements
is a work by Russian expatriate composer Igor Stravinsky. Stravinsky wrote the symphony from 1942–45 on commission by the Philharmonic Symphony Society of New York. It was premièred by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra
New York Philharmonic Orchestra
under Stravinsky on January 24, 1946. The Symphony in Three Movements
Symphony in Three Movements
is considered as Stravinsky's first major composition after emigrating to the United States.[1] It uses material written by Stravinsky for aborted film projects.[2] In 1943, Stravinsky had begun work on rescoring his ballet The Rite of Spring. Although the project was left incomplete, his revisit to this earlier composition appears to have influenced the symphony
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