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Lorient
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Lorient
Lorient
(French pronunciation: ​[lɔʁjɑ̃]; Breton: An Oriant) is a town (French "commune") and seaport in the Morbihan "department" of
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Chartered Companies
A chartered company is an association formed by investors or shareholders for the purpose of trade, exploration, and colonization. .Contents1 Notable chartered companies and their abbreviations/ years of formation1.1 Austrian 1.2 English crown charters 1.3 British crown charters 1.4 French 1.5 German 1.6 Portuguese 1.7 Low Countries 1.8 Russian 1.9 Scandinavian 1.10 Scotland 1.11 Spanish2 Appendices2.1 Notes 2.2 See also 2.3 References 2.4 External links 2.5 BibliographyNotable chartered companies and their abbreviations/ years of formation[edit] Austrian[edit]1719 Imperial Privileged Oriental Company 1722 Ostend Company 1775 Austrian East India Company[1]English crown charters[edit]The British East India Company's headquarters in London.1/8 share certificate of the
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Louis XIV Of France
Louis XIV (5 September 1638 – 1 September 1715), known as Louis the God-Given (Louis Dieudonné), Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (Roi Soleil), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon
House of Bourbon
who reigned as King of France
King of France
from 1643 until his death in 1715. Starting at the age of 4, his reign of 72 years and 110 days is the longest recorded of any monarch of a sovereign country in European history.[1][2] In the age of absolutism in Europe, Louis XIV's France was a leader in the growing centralization of power.[3] Louis began his personal rule of France
France
in 1661, after the death of his chief minister, the Italian Cardinal Mazarin.[4] An adherent of the concept of the divine right of kings, which advocates the divine origin of monarchical rule, Louis continued his predecessors' work of creating a centralized state governed from the capital
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Megalith
A megalith is a large stone that has been used to construct a structure or monument, either alone or together with other stones. The word "megalithic" describes structures made of such large stones without the use of mortar or concrete, representing periods of prehistory characterised by such constructions. For later periods, the term monolith, with an overlapping meaning, is more likely to be used. The word "megalith" comes from the Ancient Greek "μέγας" (transl. mégas meaning "great") and "λίθος" (transl. líthos meaning "stone"). Megalith
Megalith
also denotes an item consisting of rock(s) hewn in definite shapes for special purposes.[1][2][3] It has been used to describe buildings built by people from many parts of the world living in many different periods
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Roman Roads
Roman roads
Roman roads
(Latin: viae Romanae; singular: Via Romana meaning Roman way) were physical infrastructure vital to the maintenance and development of the Roman state, and were built from about 300 BC through the expansion and consolidation of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and the Roman Empire.[1] They provided efficient means for the overland movement of armies, officials, and civilians, and the inland carriage of official communications and trade goods.[2] Roman roads
Roman roads
were of several kinds, ranging from small local roads to broad, long-distance highways built to connect cities, major towns and military bases. These major roads were often stone-paved and metaled, cambered for drainage, and were flanked by footpaths, bridleways and drainage ditches. They were laid along accurately surveyed courses, and some were cut through hills, or conducted over rivers and ravines on bridgework
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Carhaix
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Carhaix-Plouguer
Carhaix-Plouguer
(Breton: Karaez-Plougêr) is a commune in the Finistère
Finistère
department in northwestern France.Contents1 Geography 2 Name 3 Culture 4 Population 5 Festivals 6 Education 7 Breton language 8 International relations 9 Sport 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksGeography[edit]Carte de Carhaix et Plouguer avant leur fusion.Carhaix is located in the Poher, an important territory of Breton, sandwiched between the Arrée Mountains to the north and the Black Mountains to the south
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Gallo-Roman
The term Gallo-Roman
Gallo-Roman
describes the Romanized culture of Gaul
Gaul
under the rule of the Roman Empire
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Jean-Baptiste Colbert
Jean-Baptiste Colbert
Jean-Baptiste Colbert
(French: [ʒɑ̃.ba.tist kɔl.bɛʁ]; 29 August 1619 – 6 September 1683) was a French politician who served as the Minister of Finances of France
France
from 1665 to 1683 under the rule of King Louis XIV. His relentless hard work and thrift made him an esteemed minister. He achieved a reputation for his work of improving the state of French manufacturing and bringing the economy back from the brink of bankruptcy
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Ordonnance
In French politics, an ordonnance (French: [ɔʁdɔnɑ̃s] ( listen), "order") is a statutory instrument issued by the Council of Ministers in an area of law normally reserved for primary legislation enacted by the French Parliament
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Slipway
A slipway, also known as boat ramp or launch, is a ramp on the shore by which ships or boats can be moved to and from the water. They are used for building and repairing ships and boats, and for launching and retrieving small boats on trailers towed by automobiles and flying boats on their undercarriage. The nautical terms ways and skids are alternative names for slipway. A ship undergoing construction in a shipyard is said to be on the ways. If a ship is scrapped there, she is said to be broken up in the ways. As the word "slip" implies, the ships or boats are moved over the ramp, by way of crane or fork lift. Prior to the move the vessel's hull is coated with grease, which then allows the ship or boat to "slip" off of the ramp and progress safely into the water. Slipways are used to launch (newly built) large ships, but can only dry-dock or repair smaller ships. Pulling large ships against the greased ramp would require too much force
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INSEE Code
The INSEE code is a numerical indexing code used by the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE) to identify various entities, including communes, départements. They are also used as national identification numbers given to people.Contents1 Created under Vichy 2 National identification numbers 3 History 4 SIREN and SIRET codes 5 Geographical codes 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksCreated under Vichy[edit]This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Franco-Dutch War
Peace among France, the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
and England:Treaty of Westminster (1674) Treaty of Nijmegen
Treaty of Nijmegen
(1678–1679)Territorial changes
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Le Havre
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Le Havre
Le Havre
(UK: /lə ˈhɑːvrə/;[3] French: [lə ɑvʁ] ( listen)), historically called in English Newhaven, is an urban French commune and city in the Seine-Maritime
Seine-Maritime
department in the Normandy
Normandy
region of northwestern France. It is situated on the right bank of the estuary of the river Seine
Seine
on the Channel southwest of the Pays de Caux. Modern Le Havre
Le Havre
remains deeply influenced by its employment and maritime traditions. Its port is the second largest in France, after that of Marseille, for total traffic, and the largest French container port
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Jean-Baptiste Colbert, Marquis De Seignelay
Jean-Baptiste Antoine Colbert, Marquis de Seignelay (1 November 1651 – 3 November 1690) was a French politician. He was the eldest son of Jean-Baptiste Colbert, nephew of Charles Colbert de Croissy
Charles Colbert de Croissy
and cousin of Jean-Baptiste Colbert
Jean-Baptiste Colbert
de Torcy. Life[edit] In 1679 Seignelay married twice; firstly to Marie Marguerite d'Alegre, who died in 1678. Secondly he married Catherine Thérèse de Goyon de Matignon Thorigny (1662–1699). Catherine was a daughter of Henri Goyon and Marie Françoise Le Tellier, herself a sister of François Michel Le Tellier de Louvois
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Secretary Of State Of The Navy (France)
The Secretary of State of the Navy (French: Secrétaire d'État de la Marine) was one of the four or five specialized secretaries of state in France
France
during the Ancien Régime. This Secretary of State was responsible for the French navy
French navy
and for French colonies. In 1791, this title was changed to Minister of Marine (Minister of the Navy). List of secretaries[edit] Main article: List of Naval Ministers of France
France
§ Secretaries of State for the Navy, 1547-1790 See also[edit]List of Naval Ministers of France Secretary of State (Ancien Régime) Secretary of State of the Maison du Roi Secretary of State for War (France) Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs (France) Secretary of State for Protestant Affairs Ancien Régime in France Early Modern France   This French history–related article is a stub
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