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Longview Race Riot
The Longview Race Riot refers to a series of violent incidents in Longview, Texas, between July 10 and July 12, 1919, when whites attacked black areas of town, killed one black man, and burned down several properties, including the houses of a black teacher and a doctor. It was the second of 25 race riots in 1919 in the United States during what became known as Red Summer, a period after World War I known for numerous riots occurring mostly in urban areas. The riot is notable for local and state officials taking actions to impose military authority and quell further violence. After ignoring early rumors of planned unrest,[2] local officials appealed to the governor for forces to quell the violence
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Longview, Texas
Longview is a city in Gregg and Harrison counties in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 80,455.[3] The estimated population in 2015 was 82,287.[4] Most of the city is located in Gregg County, of which it is the county seat;[5] a small part extends into the western part of neighboring Harrison County. Longview is located in East Texas, where Interstate 20
Interstate 20
and U.S. Highways 80 and 259 converge just north of the Sabine River. Longview is the principal city of the Longview Metropolitan Statistical Area, comprising Gregg, Upshur, and Rusk counties (population 217,781).[6] Longview is considered a major hub city for East Texas, as is the nearby city of Tyler
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Lynching In The United States
Lynching
Lynching
is the practice of murder by extrajudicial action. Lynchings in the United States
United States
rose in number after the American Civil War
American Civil War
in the late 1800s, following the emancipation of slaves; they declined after 1930 but were recorded into the 1960s. Lynchings most frequently targeted African-American men and women in the South, with lynchings also occurring in the North during the Great Migration of blacks into Northern areas. The political message—the promotion of white supremacy and black powerlessness—was an important element of the ritual, with lynchings photographed and published as postcards which were popular souvenirs in the U.S.[1][2] As well as being hanged, victims were sometimes burned alive and tortured, with body parts removed and kept as souvenirs.[3] Lynchings were most frequent from 1890 to the 1920s, with a peak in 1892
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Sheriff
A sheriff is a government official, with varying duties, existing in some countries with historical ties to England, where the office originated. There is an analogous although independently developed office in Iceland
Iceland
that is commonly translated to English as sheriff, and this is discussed below.Contents1 Description 2 Term 3 Modern usage3.1 Australia 3.2 Canada3.2.1 Alberta 3.2.2 British Columbia 3.2.3 Nova Scotia3.3 Iceland 3.4 India 3.5 Republic of Ireland 3.6 Scotland3.6.1 Sheriffs principal 3.6.2 Sheriffs 3.6.3 Summary sheriffs3.7 South Africa 3.8 United States4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] Historically, a sheriff was a legal official with responsibility for a "shire" or county
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Small Arms
In international arms control, small arms are man-portable firearms that shoot kinetic projectiles, including handguns (revolvers and pistols) and individual-operated long guns such as rifles and carbines, shotguns, submachine guns, personal defense weapons, and light machine guns. Together with light weapons, which either are team-operated (e.g
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Birdshot
A shotgun shell is a self-contained cartridge typically loaded with multiple metallic "shot", which are small, generally spherical projectiles. The shells consist of a case mounted on a brass base holding a primer. The shot is typically contained in a small container inside the shell casing.[1] Shot has traditionally been made of lead, but steel, tungsten or bismuth is frequently used due to restrictions on lead.[2] A shotgun shell can contain a single, large projectile known as a shotgun slug. They can also be made with specialty non-lethal rounds such as beanbag rounds, and rubber
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Dance Hall
Dance hall
Dance hall
in its general meaning is a hall for dancing. From the earliest years of the twentieth century until the early 1960s, the dance hall was the popular forerunner of the discothèque or nightclub. The majority of towns and cities in the West had at least one dance hall, and almost always featured live musicians playing a range of music from strict tempo ballroom dance music to big band, swing and jazz. One of the most famous dance hall musicians was Glenn Miller. Other structural forms of dance halls include the dance pavilion which has a roof but no walls, and the open-air platform which has no roof or walls. The open air nature of the dance pavilion was both a feature and a drawback
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Governor Of Texas
The Governor of Texas
Texas
is the head of the executive branch of Texas's government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces. The governor has the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the Texas
Texas
Legislature, and to convene the legislature. The governor may grant pardons in cases other than impeachment (but only when recommended by the Board of Pardons and Paroles) or in the case of treason, with permission by the legislature
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William P. Hobby
William Pettus Hobby (March 26, 1878 – June 7, 1964) was the publisher of the Houston
Houston
Post and the 27th Governor of the U.S. state of Texas
Texas
from 1917 to 1921.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 Legacy 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Moscow, Texas, Hobby became a circulation clerk for the Post in 1895 and was promoted to business writer in August 1901. In 1907 he left the Post to become manager and part owner of the Beaumont Enterprise, and he acquired the entire paper shortly thereafter. Hobby was elected Lieutenant Governor of Texas
Governor of Texas
in 1914. After James Edward Ferguson was removed from office in 1917, he became the youngest governor in the history of the state up to that point. Hobby soundly defeated Ferguson in the 1918 Democratic primary and won the governorship in his own right
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Terrell, Texas
Terrell is a city in Kaufman County, Texas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 15,816. Terrell is located 32 miles (51 km) east of Dallas.Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Climate3 Demographics 4 Arts and culture4.1 British Flying Training School 4.2 World War II
World War II
Veterans Reunion 4.3 Heritage Jubilee5 Education5.1 Public school 5.2 Colleges6 Infrastructure6.1 Health care7 Notable people 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Terrell developed as a railroad town, beginning in 1873 with construction here of the Texas
Texas
and Pacific Railroad line.[3] The town was named for Robert A. Terrell, a pioneer European-American
European-American
settler whose farm lay on its western edge. He built an octagonal house on his property, called a "Round House", to provide better defense against attacks by Native Americans
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Nacogdoches, Texas
Nacogdoches (/ˌnækəˈdoʊtʃɪs/ NAK-ə-DOH-chiss) is a small city situated in East Texas
Texas
and the county seat of Nacogdoches County, Texas,[5] United States. The 2010 U.S. Census recorded the city’s population to be 32,996.[6] Nacogdoches is a sister city of the smaller and similarly-named Natchitoches, Louisiana, the third-largest city in the Southern Ark-La-Tex. Nacogdoches is the home of Stephen F. Austin State University
Stephen F

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National Guard Of The United States
English colonial government militias: since December 13, 1636As "National Guard": since 1824 in New York, since 1903 nationwide Dual state-federal reserve forces: since 1933Country  United StatesAllegiance Federal (10 U.S.C. § E) State and territorial (32 U.S.C.)Branch   United States
United States
Army   United States
United States
Air ForceRole Reserve component of the U.S. Armed Forces Militia
Militia
of the United StatesSize 348,156[1]Part of National Guard BureauGarrison/HQ All 50 U.S. states, and organized U.S. territories, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the District of ColumbiaNickname(s) "Air Guard" "Army Guard"Motto(s) "Always Ready, Always There!"CommandersChief of the National Guard Bureau General Joseph L
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Texas And Pacific Railroad
The Texas
Texas
and Pacific Railway Company (known as the T&P) was created by federal charter in 1871 with the purpose of building a southern transcontinental railroad between Marshall, Texas, and San Diego, California.Contents1 History1.1 Major named passenger trains of the Texas
Texas
and Pacific2 Timeline 3 Legal disputes 4 Gauge 5 Land grants 6 Texas
Texas
Pacific Land Trust 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The T&P had a significant foothold in Texas
Texas
by the mid-1880s. Construction difficulties delayed westward progress, until American financier Jay Gould
Jay Gould
acquired an interest in the railroad in 1879
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Galveston, Texas
Galveston (/ˈɡælvɪstən/ GAL-vis-tən) is a coastal resort city on Galveston Island
Galveston Island
and Pelican Island in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Texas. The community of 209.3 square miles (542 km2), with an estimated population of 50,180 in 2015, is the county seat and second-largest municipality of Galveston County. It is within Houston–The Woodlands–Sugar Land metropolitan area. Named after Bernardo de Gálvez y Madrid, Count of Gálvez
Bernardo de Gálvez y Madrid, Count of Gálvez
(born in Macharaviaya, Málaga, Spain), Galveston's first European settlements on the island were built around 1816 by French pirate Louis-Michel Aury to help the fledgling Republic of Mexico
Mexico
fight Spain. The Port
Port
of Galveston was established in 1825 by the Congress of Mexico
Congress of Mexico
following its independence from Spain
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Martial Law
Martial law
Martial law
is the imposition of direct military control of normal civilian functions of government, especially in response to a temporary emergency such as invasion or major disaster, or in an occupied territory.[1][2] Martial law
Martial law
can be used by governments to enforce their rule over the public. Such incidents may occur after a coup d'état ( Thailand
Thailand
in 2006 and 2014, and Egypt
Egypt
in 2013); when threatened by popular protest (China, Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, 2009's Iranian Green Movement that led to the takeover by Revolutionary Guards); to suppress political opposition ( Poland
Poland
in 1981); or to stabilize insurrections or perceived insurrections (Canada, The October Crisis of 1970)
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