HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Long Distance Route
Scotland's Great Trails
Scotland's Great Trails
formerly the four Long Distance Routes (or LDRs) are long-distance "people-powered" trails (predominantly hiking trails but including cycling and canoe routes) in Scotland.[1] The LDRs were previously proposed and financially supported by Scottish Natural Heritage, but administered and maintained by the local authority areas through which they pass
[...More...]

"Long Distance Route" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Scottish Natural Heritage
Scottish Natural Heritage
Scottish Natural Heritage
(SNH; Scottish Gaelic: Dualchas Nàdair na h-Alba) is the Scottish public body responsible for the country's natural heritage, especially its natural, genetic and scenic diversity. It advises the Scottish Government
Scottish Government
and acts as a government agent in the delivery of conservation designations, i.e. national nature reserves, local nature reserves, long distance routes, national parks, Sites of Special
Special
Scientific Interest (SSSIs), Special
Special
Areas of Conservation, Special
Special
Protection Areas and the national scenic area. SNH is also a member of SEARS (Scotland's Environmental and Rural Services). The body has offices in most parts of Scotland including the main islands. The protected areas in Scotland account for 20% of the total area, SSSIs alone 13%
[...More...]

"Scottish Natural Heritage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Formartine And Buchan Way
The Formartine and Buchan
Buchan
Way is a long-distance footpath in Scotland, extending from Dyce
Dyce
north to Peterhead
Peterhead
and Fraserburgh. It follows the track of a former railway line, the Formartine and Buchan
Buchan
Railway, and is open to walkers and cyclists. Horse riders are also welcome on parts of the track but may require a permit. The railway closed in 1979 (Fraserburgh) and 1970 (Maud-Peterhead). The walkway opened in the early 1990s.Contents1 Accessibility 2 Route 3 Places of interest 4 Signage and condition of way 5 Users 6 Related local railway walks 7 Closure of the railway and proposal for re-opening 8 External linksAccessibility[edit] The path is around 53 miles (85 km) long and can be accessed relatively easily by public transport or car. Only the Maud station is less accessible by bus
[...More...]

"Formartine And Buchan Way" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cowal
Cowal
Cowal
(Scottish Gaelic: Còmhghall) is a peninsula in Argyll
Argyll
and Bute, in the west of Scotland, that extends into the Firth of Clyde. The northern part of the peninsula is covered by the Argyll
Argyll
Forest Park managed by Forestry Commission Scotland.[5] The Arrochar Alps[6] and Ardgoil peninsula in the north fringe the edges of the sea lochs whilst the forest park spreads out across the hillsides and mountain passes, making Cowal
Cowal
one of the remotest areas in the west of mainland Scotland
[...More...]

"Cowal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Portavadie
Portavadie; (Scottish Gaelic: Port a' Mhadaidh) is a village, on the shores of Loch Fyne
Loch Fyne
on the west coast of the Cowal
Cowal
peninsula in Argyll and Bute, Scottish Highlands.[3] The Portavadie
Portavadie
complex was built by the then Scottish Office
Scottish Office
for the purpose of constructing concrete platforms for extraction of oil from the North Sea. However, the intention was soon overtaken by acceptance that steel platforms were the future for the oil industry in Scotland. Despite suggestions to turn the complex into a holiday village, it lay redundant until in the mid-1980s the enclosed port was used by a local fish farm company. A further report in the Dunoon Observer and Argyllshire Standard, says that the derelict "village", known as Polphail, was sold to a forestry company who plan to demolish the buildings and build new houses
[...More...]

"Portavadie" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Inveruglas
Inveruglas
Inveruglas
is a hamlet on the west shore of Loch Lomond, fairly near the north end of the loch and is within the Loch Lomond
Loch Lomond
and The Trossachs National Park. It is situated on the A82 trunk road, connecting Glasgow
Glasgow
to Inverness. It was historically in Dunbartonshire, but since 1996 it has been part of Argyll and Bute. Nearby isles include Inveruglas Isle
Inveruglas Isle
and Wallace's Isle. Inversnaid
Inversnaid
is roughly opposite on the east shore, there is a pedestrian ferry. The Inveruglas
Inveruglas
Water flows into the loch at the hamlet, flowing down from Loch Sloy. The name of this watercourse is a curious back-formation, since Inveruglas
Inveruglas
means "the mouth of the Douglas"
[...More...]

"Inveruglas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Dava Way
The Dava Way is an over 23-mile (37 km) long-distance path that mostly follows the route of the former Highland Railway between Grantown and Forres. The railway line, built as a route between Inverness and Perth, opened in 1863 and closed in 1965
[...More...]

"Dava Way" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Grantown-on-Spey
Grantown-on-Spey
Grantown-on-Spey
(Scottish Gaelic: Baile nan Granndach) is a town in the Highland Council Area, historically within the county of Moray
[...More...]

"Grantown-on-Spey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Forres
Forres
Forres
(/ˈfɒrɪs/; Scottish Gaelic: Farrais) is a town and former royal burgh situated in the north of Scotland
Scotland
on the Moray
Moray
coast, approximately 25 miles (40 km) east of Inverness
Inverness
and 12 miles (19 km) west of Elgin
[...More...]

"Forres" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Fife Coastal Path
The Fife Coastal Path is a Scottish long distance footpath that runs from Kincardine to Newburgh. The path was created in 2002, originally running from North Queensferry to Tayport. It was extended in 2011 with a new section running from Kincardine to North Queensferry,[1] then again in 2012 from Newburgh to Tayport.[2] It runs for 117 miles (188 km) along the coastline of Fife and passes through many seaside towns and villages. The path would take around one week to walk completely from end to end. Places of historic interest along the route include Aberdour Castle, Macduff's Castle near East Wemyss, Wemyss Castle, and Pitmilly, a former estate associated with the Moneypenny family. On the southern bank of the river Tay between the historic rail bridge, scene of one of the greatest rail disasters in Britain and the 1960s road bridge, lies the historic town of Newport
[...More...]

"Fife Coastal Path" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kincardine
Kincardine
Kincardine
(Gaelic: Cinn Chàrdainn[2]) or Kincardine-on-Forth is a small town on the north shore of the Firth of Forth, in Fife, Scotland. The town was given the status of a burgh of barony in 1663.[3] It was at one time a reasonably prosperous minor port. The townscape retains many good examples of Scottish vernacular buildings from the 17th, 18th and early 19th centuries, although it was greatly altered during the construction of Kincardine Bridge
Kincardine Bridge
in 1932–1936.The Mercat cross
Mercat cross
at Kincardine, 2007Contents1 Transport 2 Police 3 External links 4 ReferencesTransport[edit] Kincardine Bridge
Kincardine Bridge
runs south from Kincardine. It is the main crossing-point of the Firth of Forth
Firth of Forth
between the Queensferry Crossing and Stirling
[...More...]

"Kincardine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Newburgh, Fife
Newburgh is a royal burgh and parish of Fife, Scotland
Scotland
, having a population of 2,171 (est 2011). Newburgh's population has grown about 10% since 1901 when the population was counted at 1904 persons. In 1266 Newburgh was granted burgh status by King Alexander III of Scotland, as a burgh belonging to the Abbot of Lindores. In 1600, Newburgh was given to Patrick Leslie, son of the Earl of Rothes – a powerful Scottish family - and in 1631, Newburgh was made a Royal Burgh
Burgh
by King Charles I. Newburgh is situated on the Firth of Tay, 7 m. N.W. of Ladybank Junction alongside the Edinburgh to Inverness railway line (between Perth and Ladybank). Newburgh railway station closed in 1955 (pre-Beeching)
[...More...]

"Newburgh, Fife" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Dyce
Dyce
Dyce
(Scottish Gaelic: Deis) is an area of the city of Aberdeen, Scotland, about 6 miles (9.7 km) north west of Aberdeen
Aberdeen
city centre, and best known as the location of the city's airport. It is on the River Don.Contents1 History 2 Climate 3 Economy3.1 Oil4 Transport 5 Education 6 Parks and recreation 7 People From Dyce 8 ReferencesHistory[edit] Dyce
Dyce
is the site of an early medieval church dedicated to the 8th century missionary and bishop Saint Fergus, otherwise associated with Glamis, Angus. Today the cemetery, north of the airport, and overlooking the River Don, hosts the roofless but otherwise virtually complete former St
[...More...]

"Dyce" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

New Lanark
New Lanark
Lanark
is a village on the River Clyde, approximately 1.4 miles (2.2 kilometres) from Lanark, in Lanarkshire, and some 25 miles (40 km) southeast of Glasgow, Scotland. It was founded in 1786 by David Dale, who built cotton mills and housing for the mill workers. Dale built the mills there in a brief partnership with the English inventor and entrepreneur Richard Arkwright
Richard Arkwright
to take advantage of the water power provided by the only waterfalls on the River Clyde. Under the ownership of a partnership that included Dale's son-in-law, Robert Owen, a Welsh philanthropist and social reformer, New Lanark
Lanark
became a successful business and an early example of a planned settlement and so an important milestone in the historical development of urban planning.[1] The New Lanark
Lanark
mills operated until 1968
[...More...]

"New Lanark" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aberdeen
Aberdeen
Aberdeen
(/æbərˈdiːn/ ( listen); Scots: Aiberdeen,  listen (help·info); Scottish Gaelic: Obar Dheathain [ˈopər ˈʝɛ.ɛɲ]; Latin: Aberdonia) is Scotland's third most populous city, one of Scotland's 32 local government council areas and the United Kingdom's 37th most populous built-up area, with an official population estimate of 196,670 for the city of Aberdeen[1] and 229,800 for the local authority area.[2] Nicknames include the Granite
Granite
City, the Grey City
City
and the Silver City with the Golden Sands
[...More...]

"Aberdeen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fraserburgh
Fraserburgh
Fraserburgh
(/ˈfreɪzərbrə/; Scots: The Broch or Faithlie;[2] Scottish Gaelic: A' Bhruaich) is a town in Aberdeenshire, Scotland with a population recorded in the 2011 Census at 13,100.[3] It lies at the far northeast corner of Aberdeenshire, about 40 miles (64 km) north of Aberdeen, and 17 miles (27 km) north of Peterhead
[...More...]

"Fraserburgh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.