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London And North Western Railway
The London
London
and North Western Railway
Railway
(LNWR, L&NWR) was a British railway company between 1846 and 1922
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Nationalisation
Nationalization
Nationalization
is the process of transforming private assets into public assets by bringing them under the public ownership of a national government or state.[1] Nationalization
Nationalization
usually refers to private assets or assets owned by lower levels of government, such municipalities, being transferred to the state. The opposites of nationalization are privatization and demutualization. When previously nationalized assets are privatized and subsequently returned to public ownership by a later government, they are said to have undergone renationalization or renationalisation. Industries that are usually subject to nationalization include transport, communications, energy, banking and natural resources. Nationalization
Nationalization
may occur with or without compensation to the former owners
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Leeds
Leeds
Leeds
/liːdz/ ( listen)[5] is a city in West Yorkshire, England. Historically in Yorkshire's West Riding, Leeds
Leeds
can be traced to the 5th century name for a wooded area of the Kingdom of Elmet. The name has been applied to many administrative entities over the centuries. It changed from being the name of a small manorial borough in the 13th century, through several incarnations, to being the name attached to the present metropolitan borough
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Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
(/ˈbɜːrmɪŋəm/ ( listen),[3] locally /ˈbɜːmɪŋ(ɡ)əm/ or /ˈbɜːmɪnəm/) is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands of England, standing on the River Rea
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Liverpool
Liverpool
Liverpool
(/ˈlɪvərpuːl/) is a city in North West England, with an estimated population of 484,578 in 2016 within the City
City
of Liverpool borough.[5] With its surrounding areas, it is the fifth-largest metropolitan area in the UK, with over 2.24 million people in 2011.[6] The local authority is Liverpool
Liverpool
City
City
Council, the most populous local government district within the metropolitan county of Merseyside
Merseyside
and the largest within the Liverpool
Liverpool
City
City
Region. Liverpool
Liverpool
is located on the eastern side of the Mersey Estuary, and historically lay within the ancient hundred of West Derby
West Derby
in the south west of the county of Lancashire.[7][8] It became a borough in 1207 and a city in 1880
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Manchester
Coordinates: 53°28′46″N 2°14′43″W / 53.47944°N 2.24528°W / 53.47944; -2.24528Manchester City
City
and Metropolitan boroughClockwise from top: Skyline of Manchester
Manchester

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Edinburgh
Edinburgh
Edinburgh
(/ˈɛdɪnb(ə)rə/ ( listen);[6][7][8] Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Èideann [ˈt̪uːn ˈeːtʲən̪ˠ]; Scots: Edinburgh) is the capital city of Scotland
Scotland
and one of its 32 council areas. It is located in Lothian
Lothian
on the Firth of Forth's southern shore. Recognised as the capital of Scotland
Scotland
since at least the 15th century, Edinburgh
Edinburgh
is the seat of the Scottish Government, the Scottish Parliament and the supreme courts of Scotland. The city's Palace of Holyroodhouse is the official residence of the Monarchy in Scotland. Historically part of the county of Midlothian, the city has long been a centre of education, particularly in the fields of medicine, Scots law, literature, the sciences and engineering
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Classical Architecture
Classical architecture
Classical architecture
usually denotes architecture which is more or less consciously derived from the principles of Greek and Roman architecture of classical antiquity, or sometimes even more specifically, from the works of Vitruvius.[1][2] Different styles of classical architecture have arguably existed since the Carolingian Renaissance,[3] and prominently since the Italian Renaissance. Although classical styles of architecture can vary greatly, they can in general all be said to draw on a common "vocabulary" of decorative and constructive elements.[4][5][6] In much of the Western world, dif
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Philip Charles Hardwick
Philip Charles Hardwick
Philip Charles Hardwick
( London
London
1822–1892) was an English architect.Contents1 Life 2 Family history 3 Notable projects 4 ReferencesLife[edit]Hardwick's impression of the Great Hall at Euston Station, 1844. Philip Charles Hardwick
Philip Charles Hardwick
was born in Westminster
Westminster
in London, the son of the architect Philip Hardwick
Philip Hardwick
(1792–1870) and grandson of architect Thomas Hardwick
Thomas Hardwick
(junior) (1752–1825). His mother was also from an eminent architectural family, the Shaws. Philip Charles Hardwick's maternal grandfather was John Shaw Senior (1776–1832) and his uncle was John Shaw Jr (1803–1870). Hardwick trained under his father and also Edward Blore
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Glasgow
Glasgow
Glasgow
(/ˈɡlɑːzɡoʊ, ˈɡlɑːs-, ˈɡlæz-, ˈɡlæs-/;[6][7] Scots: Glesga /ˈɡlezɡə/; Scottish Gaelic: Glaschu [ˈkl̪ˠas̪əxu]) is the largest city in Scotland, and third most populous in the United Kingdom. Historically part of Lanarkshire, the city now forms the Glasgow
Glasgow
City council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland; the local authority is Glasgow
Glasgow
City Council. Glasgow
Glasgow
is situated on the River Clyde
River Clyde
in the country's West Central Lowlands. Inhabitants of the city are referred to as "Glaswegians" or "Weegies". It is the fourth most visited city in the UK. Glasgow
Glasgow
grew from a small rural settlement on the River Clyde
River Clyde
to become the largest seaport in Britain
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Portland Stone
Portland stone
Portland stone
is a limestone from the Tithonian
Tithonian
stage of the Jurassic period quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset. The quarries consist of beds of white-grey limestone separated by chert beds. It has been used extensively as a building stone throughout the British Isles, notably in major public buildings in London
London
such as St Paul's Cathedral and Buckingham Palace
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Waterford
Waterford
Waterford
(from Old Norse
Old Norse
Veðrafjǫrðr, meaning "ram (wether) fjord", Irish: Port
Port
Láirge) is a city in Ireland. It is in County Waterford
Waterford
in the south east of Ireland
Ireland
and is part of the province of Munster. The city is situated at the head of Waterford
Waterford
Harbour. It is the oldest[2][3] and the fifth most populous city in the Republic of Ireland. It is the eighth most populous city on the island of Ireland. Waterford
Waterford
City
City
and County Council is the local government authority for the city
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London Midland Region Of British Railways
The London Midland
London Midland
Region (LMR) was one of the six regions created on the formation of the nationalised British Railways
British Railways
(BR) and initially consisted of ex- London, Midland and Scottish Railway
London, Midland and Scottish Railway
(LMS) lines in England
England
and Wales. The region was managed first from buildings adjacent to Euston station and later from Stanier House in Birmingham. It existed from the creation of BR in 1948, ceased to be an operating unit in its own right in the 1980s and was wound up at the end of 1992.Contents1 Territory 2 Locomotives and rolling stock 3 West Coast Main Line
West Coast Main Line
electrification 4 ReferencesTerritory[edit] At its inception, the LMR's territory consisted of ex-LMS lines in England
England
and Wales
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Grand Junction Railway
Junction may refer to:Contents1 Electricity 2 Finance 3 Science and technology 4 Transport 5 Places 6 Popular culture 7 See alsoElectricity[edit]Electrical junction Thermoelectricity
Thermoelectricity
junction, a metal–metal junction Metal–semiconductor junction p–n junction, or semiconductor–semiconductor junctionMagnetic tunnel junction
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Joint Stock Company
A joint-stock company is a business entity in which shares of the company's stock can be bought and sold by shareholders. Each shareholder owns company stock in proportion, evidenced by their shares (certificates of ownership).[1] Shareholders are able to transfer their shares to others without any effects to the continued existence of the company.[2] In modern-day corporate law, the existence of a joint-stock company is often synonymous with incorporation (possession of legal personality separate from shareholders) and limited liability (shareholders are liable for the company's debts only to the value of the money they have invested in the company). Therefore, joint-stock companies are commonly known as corporations or limited companies. Some jurisdictions still provide the possibility of registering joint-stock companies without limited liability. In the United Kingdom and other countries that have adopted its model of company law, they are known as unlimited companies
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Nottingham
Nottingham
Nottingham
(/ˈnɒtɪŋəm/ ( listen) NOT-ing-əm) is a city and unitary authority area in Nottinghamshire, England, 128 miles (206 km) north of London, in the East Midlands. Nottingham
Nottingham
has links to the legend of Robin Hood
Robin Hood
and to the lace-making, bicycle (notably Raleigh bikes), and tobacco industries. It was granted its city charter in 1897 as part of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee celebrations. Nottingham
Nottingham
is a tourist destination; in 2011, visitors spent over £1.5 billion—the thirteenth-highest amount in England's 111 statistical territories.[6] In 2015, Nottingham
Nottingham
had an estimated population of 321,550[7] with the wider urban area, which includes many of the city's suburbs, having a population of 915,977
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