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Location Map Wales Vale Of Glamorgan Barry
Glamorgan
Glamorgan
(/ɡləˈmɔːrɡən/), or sometimes Glamorganshire, (Welsh: Morgannwg [mɔrˈɡanʊɡ] or Sir Forgannwg [ˈsiːr vɔrˈɡanʊɡ]) is one of the thirteen historic counties of Wales
Wales
and a former administrative county of Wales. It was originally an early medieval petty kingdom of varying boundaries known as Glywysing
Glywysing
until taken over by the Normans
Normans
as a lordship. Glamorgan
Glamorgan
is latterly represented by the three preserved counties of Mid Glamorgan, South Glamorgan and West Glamorgan
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Glamorgan (other)
Glamorgan
Glamorgan
may refer to the following places:in AustraliaGlamorgan/Spring Bay, the municipality covering the southern east coast of Tasmania, Australiain CanadaGlamorgan, Calgary, a neighbourhood of Calgary, Alberta, Canadain the United Kingdom Glamorgan
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Hominini
?Pan AustralopithecinaHomo †Australopithecus †Kenyanthropus †Paranthropus †Ardipithecus?†Sahelanthropus ?†Orrorin ?†Graecopithecus[1] (? =more field data needed) († =extinct =fossil)The Hominini
Hominini
("hominins") form a taxonomic tribe of the subfamily Homininae
Homininae
("hominines"). Hominini
Hominini
includes genus Homo
Homo
(humans), but excludes genus Gorilla
Gorilla
(gorillas). There is at present (as of 2018[update]) no consensus on whether it should include genus Pan (the chimpanzees), the question being closely tied to the complex speciation process connecting humans and chimpanzees and the development of bipedalism in proto-humans. The tribe was originally introduced by Gray (1824), long before any details on the speciation of Pan and Homo
Homo
were known
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Capital City
A capital city (or simply capital) is the municipality exercising primary status in a country, state, province, or other administrative region, usually as its seat of government. A capital is typically a city that physically encompasses the government's offices and meeting places; the status as capital is often designated by its law or constitution. In some jurisdictions, including several countries, the different branches of government are located in different settlements. In some cases, a distinction is made between the official (constitutional) capital and the seat of government, which is in another place. Capital cities that are also the prime economic, cultural, or intellectual centres of a nation or an empire are sometimes referred to as primate cities
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Swansea
Swansea
Swansea
(/ˈswɒnzi/; Welsh: Abertawe [abɛrˈtawɛ]), officially known as the City and County of Swansea
Swansea
(Welsh: Dinas a Sir Abertawe), is a coastal city and county in Wales.[2] Swansea
Swansea
lies within the historic county boundaries of Glamorgan
Glamorgan
and the ancient Welsh commote of Gŵyr on the southwest coast.[3] The county area includes Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) and the Gower Peninsula. According to its local council, the City and County of Swansea
Swansea
had a population of 241,300 in 2014. The last official census stated that the city, metropolitan and urban areas combined concluded to be a total of 462,000 in 2011,[4] making it the second most populous local authority area in Wales
Wales
after Cardiff
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Craig Y Llyn
Craig y Llyn
Craig y Llyn
is a mountain situated in Rhigos
Rhigos
on the west side of the upper Cynon Valley
Cynon Valley
and north of the Rhondda Valleys
Rhondda Valleys
in South Wales; it is the highest point in the traditional county of Glamorgan. It has been designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest
Site of Special Scientific Interest
and is named from the cliffs of its steep northern escarpment which overlook Llyn Fawr.Contents1 Description 2 Geology 3 References 4 See also 5 External linksDescription[edit] Craig y Llyn
Craig y Llyn
is situated in Rhigos, which lies in the Cynon Valley
Cynon Valley
in the Rhondda Cynon Taff, Wales. The hill is covered by forestry, except for the steep north and northeast faces, and is crowned with a trig point
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Rhigos
Rhigos
Rhigos
is a village in the north of the Cynon Valley, in the county borough of Rhondda Cynon Taf, South Wales. The population of the community at the 2011 census was 894.[1] For postal purposes it comes under the town of Aberdare, although it is some 7 miles (11 km) from Aberdare
Aberdare
town centre, and 2 miles (3.2 km) from Glyn Neath.Contents1 Governance 2 Geography 3 History3.1 ROF Hirwaun4 Present 5 Sport and leisure 6 Transport 7 Notable people 8 References 9 External linksGovernance[edit] A Rhigos
Rhigos
electoral ward exists, which also contains most of Hirwaun community. According to the 2011 Census the ward had a total population of 1,700.[2] Geography[edit] Rhigos
Rhigos
lies at the apex of the Cynon Valley
Cynon Valley
and the Vale of Neath
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Cynon Valley
Coordinates: 51°39′25″N 3°27′40″W / 51.657°N 3.461°W / 51.657; -3.461Cynon ValleyArea • 1974 44,639 acres (180.65 km2)[1]Population • 1973 69,630[2] • 1992 65,600[3]History • Created 1974 • Abolished 1996 • Succeeded by Rhondda
Rhondda
Cynon TafStatus District, Borough • HQ Aberdare
Aberdare
(Welsh: Aberdâr) Cynon Valley
Cynon Valley
(Welsh: Cwm Cynon) is one of many former coal mining valleys within the South Wales Valleys
South Wales Valleys
of Wales. Cynon Valley
Cynon Valley
lies between Rhondda
Rhondda
and the Merthyr Valley
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History Of Wales
The history of Wales
Wales
begins with the arrival of human beings in the region thousands of years ago. Neanderthals lived in what is now Wales, or Cymru in Welsh, at least 230,000 years ago,[1] while Homo sapiens arrived by about 31,000 BC.[2] However, continuous habitation by modern humans dates from the period after the end of the last ice age around 9000 BC, and Wales
Wales
has many remains from the Mesolithic, Neolithic, and Bronze
Bronze
Age. During the Iron Age the region, like all of Britain south of the Firth of Forth, was dominated by the Celtic Britons and the Brittonic language.[3] The Romans, who began their conquest of Britain in AD 43, first campaigned in what is now northeast Wales
Wales
in 48 against the Deceangli, and gained total control of the region with their defeat of the Ordovices
Ordovices
in 79
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Prehistoric Wales
Prehistoric Wales
Wales
in terms of human settlements covers the period from about 230,000 years ago, the date attributed to the earliest human remains found in what is now Wales, to the year AD 48 when the Roman army began a military campaign against one of the Welsh tribes. Traditionally, historians have believed that successive waves of immigrants brought different cultures into the area, largely replacing the previous inhabitants, with the last wave of immigrants being the Celts. However, studies of population genetics now suggest that this may not be true, and that immigration was on a smaller scale.Contents1 Palaeolithic 2 Mesolithic 3 Neolithic 4 The Bronze
Bronze
Age 5 The Iron Age 6 Notes 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksPalaeolithic[edit] The earliest known human remains discovered in modern-day Wales
Wales
date from 230,000 years ago
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Parc Cwm Long Cairn
Parc Cwm long cairn
Parc Cwm long cairn
(Welsh: carn hir Parc Cwm), also known as Parc le Breos burial chamber (siambr gladdu Parc le Breos), is a partly restored Neolithic
Neolithic
chambered tomb, identified in 1937 as a Severn-Cotswold type of chambered long barrow. The cromlech, a megalithic burial chamber, was built around 5850 years before present (BP), during the early Neolithic. It is about seven ​1⁄2 miles (12 km) west south–west of Swansea, Wales, in what is now known as Coed y Parc Cwm at Parc le Breos, on the Gower Peninsula. A trapezoidal cairn of rubble – the upper part of the cromlech and its earth covering now removed – about 72 feet (22 m) long by 43 feet (13 m) (at its widest), is revetted by a low dry-stone wall. A bell-shaped, south-facing forecourt, formed by the wall, leads to a central passageway lined with limestone slabs set on end
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Neolithic
farming, animal husbandry pottery, metallurgy, wheel circular ditches, henges, megaliths Neolithic
Neolithic
religion↓ ChalcolithicThe Neolithic
Neolithic
(/ˌniːəˈlɪθɪk/ ( listen)[1]) was a period in the development of human technology, beginning about 10,200 BC, according to the ASPRO chronology, in some parts of the Middle East, and later in other parts of the world[2] and ending between 4500 and 2000 BC. Traditionally considered the last part of the Stone Age
Stone Age
or The New Stone Age, the Neolithic
Neolithic
followed the terminal Holocene
Holocene
Epipaleolithic period and commenced with the beginning of farming, which produced the " Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution"
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Chamber Tomb
A chamber tomb is a tomb for burial used in many different cultures. In the case of individual burials, the chamber is thought to signify a higher status for the interree than a simple grave. Built from rock or sometimes wood, the chambers could also serve as places for storage of the dead from one family or social group and were often used over long periods for multiple burials. Most chamber tombs were constructed from large stones or megaliths and covered by cairns, barrows or earth. Some chamber tombs are rock-cut monuments or wooden-chambered tombs covered with earth barrows. Grave goods are a common characteristic of chamber tomb burials. In Neolithic
Neolithic
and Bronze Age
Bronze Age
Europe, stone-built examples of these burials are known by the generic term of megalithic tombs
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Climate Change
Atmospheric physics Atmospheric dynamics (category) Atmospheric chemistry
Atmospheric chemistry
(category)Meteorology Weather
Weather
(category) · (portal) Tropical cyclone
Tropical cyclone
(category)Climatology Climate
Climate
(category) Climate
Climate
change (category) Global warming
Global warming
(category) · (portal)v t e Climate
Climate
change is a change in the statistical distribution of weather patterns when that change lasts for an extended period of time (i.e., decades to millions of years). Climate
Climate
change may refer to a change in average weather conditions, or in the time variation of weather within the context of longer-term average conditions
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Carmarthenshire
Carmarthenshire
Carmarthenshire
(/kərˈmɑːrðənʃɪər/ or /kərˈmɑːrðənʃər/;[1] Welsh: Sir Gaerfyrddin; [siːr gɑːɨrˈvərðɪn] or informally Sir Gâr) is a unitary authority in the southwest of Wales
Wales
and is the largest of the thirteen historic counties of Wales. The three largest towns are Llanelli, Carmarthen and Ammanford. Carmarthen
Carmarthen
is the county town and administrative centre of Carmarthenshire, but the most populous settlement is Llanelli. Carmarthenshire
Carmarthenshire
has been inhabited since prehistoric times. The town of Carmarthen
Carmarthen
was founded by the Romans, and the region was part of the Principality of Deheubarth
Deheubarth
during the High Middle Ages
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Glacier
A glacier (US: /ˈɡleɪʃər/ or UK: /ˈɡlæsiə/) is a persistent body of dense ice that is constantly moving under its own weight; it forms where the accumulation of snow exceeds its ablation (melting and sublimation) over many years, often centuries. Glaciers slowly deform and flow due to stresses induced by their weight, creating crevasses, seracs, and other distinguishing features. They also abrade rock and debris from their substrate to create landforms such as cirques and moraines. Glaciers form only on land and are distinct from the much thinner sea ice and lake ice that form on the surface of bodies of water. On Earth, 99% of glacial ice is contained within vast ice sheets in the polar regions, but glaciers may be found in mountain ranges on every continent including Oceania's high-latitude oceanic islands such as New Zealand
New Zealand
and Papua New Guinea
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