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Lithium Polymer Battery
A lithium polymer battery, or more correctly lithium-ion polymer battery (abbreviated as LiPo, LIP, Li-poly, lithium-poly and others), is a rechargeable battery of lithium-ion technology using a polymer electrolyte instead of a liquid one. High conductivity semisolid (gel) polymers form this electrolyte
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Electronic Cigarette
An electronic cigarette or e-cigarette[note 1] is a handheld electronic device that simulates the feeling of tobacco smoking
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Laminate
Lamination
Lamination
is the technique of manufacturing a material in multiple layers, so that the composite material achieves improved strength, stability, sound insulation, appearance or other properties from the use of differing materials. A laminate is a permanently assembled object by heat, pressure, welding, or adhesives.[1]Contents1 Materials 2 Building materials2.1 Paper3 Photo laminators 4 Film types 5 See also 6 ReferencesMaterials[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)There are different lamination processes, depending on the type of materials to be laminated. The materials used in laminates can be the same or different, depending on the processes and the object to be laminated
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Poly(methyl Methacrylate)
Poly(methyl methacrylate)
Poly(methyl methacrylate)
(PMMA), also known as acrylic or acrylic glass as well as by the trade names Crylux, Plexiglas, Acrylite, Lucite, and Perspex among several others (see below), is a transparent thermoplastic often used in sheet form as a lightweight or shatter-resistant alternative to glass. The same material can be used as a casting resin, in inks and coatings, and has many other uses. Although not a type of familiar silica-based glass, the substance, like many thermoplastics, is often technically classified as a type of glass (in that it is a non-crystalline vitreous substance) hence its occasional historical designation as acrylic glass. Chemically, it is the synthetic polymer of methyl methacrylate
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Polyvinylidene Fluoride
Polyvinylidene fluoride
Polyvinylidene fluoride
or polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) is a highly non-reactive thermoplastic fluoropolymer produced by the polymerization of vinylidene difluoride. PVDF is a specialty plastic used in applications requiring the highest purity, as well as resistance to solvents, acids and bases. Compared to other fluoropolymers, like polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon), PVDF has a low density (1.78 g/cm3). It is available as piping products, sheet, tubing, films, plate and an insulator for premium wire. It can be injected, molded or welded and is commonly used in the chemical, semiconductor, medical and defense industries, as well as in lithium-ion batteries. It is also available as a crosslinked closed-cell foam, used increasingly in aviation and aerospace applications. It can also be used in repeated contact with food products, as it is FDA compliant and absolutely non-toxic
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GS Yuasa
USD 2.93 billion (FY 2014) (JPY 348 billion) (FY 2014)Net income USD 96.91 million (FY 2013) (JPY 9.98 billion) (FY 2013)Number of employees13,609 (consolidated)(as of March 31, 2014)Website Official websiteFootnotes / references [1] GS Yuasa
GS Yuasa
Corporation (株式会社ジーエス・ユアサ コーポレーション, Kabushiki-gaisha GS Yuasa
GS Yuasa
Kōporēshon) is a Japanese company that makes lead acid automobile and motorcycle batteries
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Bellcore
Telcordia Technologies, Inc., doing business as iconectiv, is an American subsidiary of the Swedish telecommunications company Ericsson. The company provides interconnection technology and clearinghouse solutions for numbering plan, routing, call billing, and technical standards coordination between competing telecommunications carriers. Telcordia's headquarters are located in Bridgewater, New Jersey (U.S.). The company maintains several branches and subsidiaries in the Americas, Europe, and Asia. Telcordia was formerly known as Bell Communications Research, Inc. or Bellcore
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Polyethylene
Polyethylene
Polyethylene
or polythene (abbreviated PE; IUPAC
IUPAC
name polyethene or poly(ethylene)) is the most common plastic. The annual global production is around 80 million tonnes.[3] Its primary use is in packaging (plastic bags, plastic films, geomembranes, containers including bottles, etc.). Many kinds of polyethylene are known, with most having the chemical formula (C2H4)n
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Polypropylene
0.946 g/cm3, crystallineMelting point 130 to 171 °C (266 to 340 °F; 403 to 444 K)Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).Y verify (what is YN ?)Infobox references Polypropylene
Polypropylene
(PP), also known as polypropene, is a thermoplastic polymer used in a wide variety of applications. An addition polymer made from the monomer propylene, it can be produced in a variety of structures giving rise to applications including packaging and labeling, textiles, plastic parts and reusable containers of various types, laboratory equipment, automotive components, and medical devices
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Carbon
Carbon
Carbon
(from Latin: carbo "coal") is a chemical element with symbol C and atomic number 6. It is nonmetallic and tetravalent—making four electrons available to form covalent chemical bonds. It belongs to group 14 of the periodic table.[13] Three isotopes occur naturally, 12C and 13C being stable, while 14C is a radionuclide, decaying with a half-life of about 5,730 years.[14] Carbon
Carbon
is one of the few elements known since antiquity.[15] Carbon
Carbon
is the 15th most abundant element in the Earth's crust, and the fourth most abundant element in the universe by mass after hydrogen, helium, and oxygen. Carbon's abundance, its unique diversity of organic compounds, and its unusual ability to form polymers at the temperatures commonly encountered on Earth
Earth
enables this element to serve as a common element of all known life
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Battery Pack
A battery pack is a set of any number of (preferably) identical batteries or individual battery cells. They may be configured in a series, parallel or a mixture of both to deliver the desired voltage, capacity, or power density. The term battery pack is often used in reference to radio-controlled hobby toys and battery electric vehicles. Components of battery packs include the individual batteries or cells, and the interconnects which provide electrical conductivity between them. Rechargeable battery packs often contain a temperature sensor, which the battery charger uses to detect the end of charging. Interconnects
Interconnects
are also found in batteries as they are the part which connects each cell, though batteries are most often only arranged in series strings. When a pack contains groups of cells in parallel there are differing wiring configurations which take into consideration the electrical balance of the circuit
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Delamination
Delamination
Delamination
is a mode of failure for composite materials[1] and steel.[2] In laminated materials, repeated cyclic stresses, impact, and so on can cause layers to separate, forming a mica-like structure of separate layers, with significant loss of mechanical toughness. Delamination
Delamination
also occurs in reinforced concrete structures subject to reinforcement corrosion, in which case the oxidized metal of the reinforcement is greater in volume than the original metal
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Diethyl Carbonate
Diethyl carbonate
Diethyl carbonate
(sometimes abbreviated DEC) is a carbonate ester of carbonic acid and ethanol with the formula OC(OCH2CH3)2. At room temperature (25 °C) diethyl carbonate is a clear liquid with a low flash point. Diethyl carbonate
Diethyl carbonate
is used as a solvent such as in erythromycin intramuscular injections. It can be used as a component of electrolytes in lithium batteries. It has been proposed as a fuel additive to support cleaner diesel fuel combustion because its high boiling point might reduce blended fuels' volatility, minimize vapor buildup in warm weather that can block fuel lines.[3] Production[edit] It can be made by reacting phosgene with ethanol, producing hydrogen chloride as a byproduct
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Mobile Phone
A mobile phone, known as a cell phone in North America, is a portable telephone that can make and receive calls over a radio frequency link while the user is moving within a telephone service area. The radio frequency link establishes a connection to the switching systems of a mobile phone operator, which provides access to the public switched telephone network (PSTN). Modern mobile telephone services use a cellular network architecture, and, therefore, mobile telephones are called cellular telephones or cell phones, in North America. In addition to telephony, 2000s-era mobile phones support a variety of other services, such as text messaging, MMS, email, Internet
Internet
access, short-range wireless communications (infrared, Bluetooth), business applications, video games, and digital photography
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Notebook Computers
A laptop, often called a notebook computer or just notebook, is a small, portable personal computer with a "clamshell" form factor, having, typically, a thin LCD or LED
LED
computer screen mounted on the inside of the upper lid of the "clamshell" and an alphanumeric keyboard on the inside of the lower lid. The "clamshell" is opened up to use the computer
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Radio-controlled Car
Radio
Radio
controlled (or R/C) cars are battery/gas-powered model cars or trucks that can be controlled from a distance using a specialized transmitter or remote. The term "R/C" has been used to mean both "remote controlled" and "radio controlled", where "remote controlled" includes vehicles that are connected to their controller by a wire, but common use of "R/C" today usually refers to vehicles controlled by a radio-frequency link. This article focuses on radio-controlled vehicles only. Cars are powered by various sources. Electric models are powered by small but powerful electric motors and rechargeable nickel-cadmium, nickel metal hydride, or lithium polymer cells. There are also brushed or brushless electric motors. Most fuel-powered models use glow plug engines, small internal combustion engines fueled by a special mixture of nitromethane, methanol, and oil (in most cases a blend of castor oil and synthetic oil)
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