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Japanese Cuisine
Japanese cuisine encompasses the regional and traditional foods of Japan, which have developed through centuries of political, economic, and social changes. The traditional cuisine of Japan, washoku (和食), lit. "Japanese eating" (or kappō (ja:割烹)), is based on rice with miso soup and other dishes; there is an emphasis on seasonal ingredients. Side dishes often consist of fish, pickled vegetables, and vegetables cooked in broth. Seafood is common, often grilled, but also served raw as sashimi or in sushi. Seafood and vegetables are also deep-fried in a light batter, as tempura. Apart from rice, staples include noodles, such as soba and udon. Japan also has many simmered dishes such as fish products in broth called oden, or beef in sukiyaki and nikujaga. Historically influenced by Chinese cuisine, Japanese cuisine has opened up to influence from Western cuisines in the modern era
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Sop
A sop is a piece of bread or toast that is drenched in liquid and then eaten. In medieval cuisine, sops were very common; they were served with broth, soup or wine, salt water and then picked apart into smaller pieces to soak in the liquid. At elaborate feasts, bread was often pre-cut into finger-sized pieces rather than broken off by the diners themselves. The bread or croutons traditionally served with French onion soup, which took its current form in the 18th century, can be considered modern-day sops.[citation needed] The word soup is a cognate of sop, both stemming ultimately from the same Germanic source
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Coconut Jam

The word for coconut jam in the Malay language, kaya, means rich, referencing the texture of the popular food. For Malaysians, Indonesians and Singaporeans, kaya,[2] also called srikaya (coconut egg jam), is a sweet creamy coconut spread made from coconut milk (locally known as sThe word for coconut jam in the Malay language, kaya, means rich, referencing the texture of the popular food. For Malaysians, Indonesians and Singaporeans, kaya,[2] also called srikaya (coconut egg jam), is a sweet creamy coconut spread made from coconut milk (locally known as santan) and duck or chicken eggs (which are flavored with pandan leaf and sweetened with sugar). The resulting color varies depending on the color of the egg yolks, the amount of pandan, and the extent of the caramelization of the sugar
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Kaya Toast
Kaya toast is a traditional Malaysia and Singaporen breakfast item invented by the Hainanese immigrants. The food consists of two slices of toast with butter and kaya (coconut jam), commonly served alongside coffee and soft-boiled eggs.[1][2] Kaya toast can also be eaten in the afternoon as a snack.[2] The introduction of kaya toast happened in close timing with the appearance of kopi tiams or coffee shops. It is speculated that Hainanese immigrants that served the British would use their learnt skills to open these kopi tiam establishments.[3] The popularity of kaya toast is so tightly linked with kopi tiams that even now, shop chains such as Ya Kun Kaya Toast and Killiney Kopitiam continue to assist the popularity of kaya toast in modern times with re-creations and adaptations of the toast. There are various ways to make kaya, some recipes are passed down from one family member to the other
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Roti Bakar
Roti bakar (lit. grilled bread) is an Indonesian sandwich that consists of two slices of grilled white bread and a filling, such as sugar, margarine, butter, hagelslag, chocolate spread, cheese, peanut butter, strawberry jam, or coconut jam. It is considered as alternative quick breakfast and a common street food. The Dutch arrived in Indonesia in the 16th century in search of spices. When the Dutch East India Company (VOC) went bankrupt in 1800, Indonesia became a treasured colony of the Netherlands.[1] Through colonialism, Europeans introduced breads. Roti bakar was created during the colonial era with Dutch-influenced. Bread, butter and margarine, sandwiches filled with ham, cheese or fruit jam, poffertjes, pannekoek and Dutch cheeses are commonly consumed by colonial Dutch and Indos during the colonial era
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Toaster Pastry

A toaster pastry is a type of bakers' confection, and a convenience food. They are thin rectangles often made of rice bran, molasses, flour, syrup, and shortening, which on one side usually has a coating of icing that has been dried with starch. They contain sweetened liquid fillings, often fruit preserves or other flavoring ingredients such as chocolate or cinnamon. They may be heated in a toaster or oven before being eaten, however, it is not required; they are edible "raw", as they are precooked during the factory process. The following list includes some popular brands of toaster pastries:



Red Bean Paste
Red bean paste (traditional Chinese: 豆沙/紅豆沙; simplified Chinese: 豆沙/红豆沙; Japanese: 餡こ or 小豆餡; Korean: 팥소) or red bean jam,[1] also called adzuki bean paste or anko (in Japanese),[2] is a paste made of red beans (also called "azuki beans"), used in East Asian cuisine. The paste is prepared by boiling the beans, then mashing or grinding them. At this stage, the paste can be sweetened or left as it is. The color of the paste is usually dark red, which comes from the husk of the beans
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Dim Sum

Dim sum (traditional Chinese: 點心; simplified Chinese: 点心; pinyin: diǎnxīn; Cantonese Yale: dímsām) is a large range of small dishes that Cantonese people traditionally enjoy in restaurants for breakfast and lunch.[1][2] In the tenth century, when the city of Guangzhou (Canton) began to experience an increase in commercial travel,[3] travelers concurrently began to frequent teahouses for small-portion meals with tea called yum cha, or "drink tea" meals.[4][3][5] Yum cha includes two related concepts.[6] The first is Yat jung Leung gin (一盅兩件), which translates literally as "one cup, two pieces". This refers to the custom of serving teahouse customers two pieces of delicately made food items, savory or sweet, to complement their tea. The second is dim sum (點心) and translates literally to "touching heart" (i.e
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Ya Kun Kaya Toast
Coordinates: 1°18′N 103°48′E / 1.3°N 103.8°E / 1.3; 103.8 Ya Kun Kaya Toast (Simplified Chinese: 亚坤加椰面包) is a Singaporean chain of mass-market, retro-ambience cafés selling toast products (notably kaya toast), soft-boiled eggs and coffee. Founded by Loi Ah Koon in 1944, Ya Kun remained a small family-run stall for decades, but has expanded rapidly since Loi's youngest son headed the business in 1999
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