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List Of Category A Listed Buildings In The Western Isles
This is a list of Category A listed buildings in the Western Isles of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: Na h-Eileanan Siar). In Scotland, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of "special architectural or historic interest". Category A structures are those considered to be "buildings of national or international importance, either architectural or historic, or fine little-altered examples of some particular period, style or building type." Listing was begun by a provision in the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act 1947, and the current legislative basis for listing is the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997. The authority for listing rests with Historic Scotland, an executive agency of the Scottish Government, which inherited this role from the Scottish Development Department in 1991
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Eochar
Iochdar (Scottish Gaelic: An t-Ìochdair), also spelled Eochar, is a hamlet and community on the west coast of the island of South Uist, in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland
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Church Of St Clement, Rodel
St Clement's Church (Scottish Gaelic: Tùr Chliamhainn, meaning Clement's Tower) is a late fifteenth-century or early sixteenth-century church in Rodel, Harris, Scotland, built for the Chiefs of the MacLeods of Harris. It is dedicated to Pope Clement I
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Scalpay, Outer Hebrides
Scalpay (Scottish Gaelic: Sgalpaigh or Sgalpaigh na Hearadh i.e
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Thomas Smith (engineer)
Thomas Smith (1752–1814) was a Scottish businessman and early lighthouse engineer.

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North Uist
North Uist (Scottish Gaelic: Uibhist a Tuath pronounced [ˈɯ.ɪʃtʲ ə t̪ʰuə]) is an island and community in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland.

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Stornoway
Stornoway (/ˈstɔːrnəw/ (About this sound listen); Scottish Gaelic: Steòrnabhagh) is a town on the Isle of Lewis, in the Outer Hebrides (also known as the Western Isles) of Scotland. The town's population is around 8,000, making it by far the largest town in the Hebrides. The traditional civil parish of Stornoway, which includes various nearby villages, has a combined population of just over 10,000. Stornoway is an important port and the major town and administrative centre of the Outer Hebrides. It is home to Comhairle nan Eilean Siar (the Western Isles Council) and a variety of educational, sporting and media establishments. Observance of the Christian Sabbath (Sunday) has long been an aspect of the island's culture
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Lochboisdale
Lochboisdale (Scottish Gaelic: Loch Baghasdail) is the main village and port on the island of South Uist, Outer Hebrides, Scotland
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South Uist
South Uist (Scottish Gaelic: Uibhist a Deas) is the second-largest island of the Outer Hebrides in Scotland. At the 2011 census, it had a usually resident population of 1,754, a fall of 64 since 2001. There is a nature reserve and a number of sites of archaeological interest, including the only location in Great Britain where prehistoric mummies have been found. The population is about 90% Roman Catholic. The island, in common with the rest of the Hebrides, is one of the last remaining strongholds of the Gaelic language in Scotland. In 2006 South Uist, and neighbouring Benbecula and Eriskay, were involved in Scotland's biggest community land buyout to date. In the northwest, there is a missile testing range
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Aignish
Aignish (Scottish Gaelic: Aiginis) is located northwest of Knock and east of Stornoway on the east coast of the Isle of Lewis, in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. The township is at the island side of the isthmus connecting to the Eye peninsula
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Scots Baronial
Scottish Baronial architecture (often Scots Baronial and sometimes Baronial style) is a style of architecture with its origins in the sixteenth century. "Castle-like", the style draws on the features of Medieval castles, tower houses and the French Renaissance châteaux
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British National Grid Reference System
The Ordnance Survey National Grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG). The Ordnance Survey (OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey or by commercial map producers
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Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey (OS) is a national mapping agency in the United Kingdom which covers the island of Great Britain. It is one of the world's largest producers of maps. Since 1 April 2015 it has operated as Ordnance Survey Ltd, a government-owned company, 100% in public ownership. The Ordnance Survey Board remains accountable to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. It is also a member of the Public Data Group. The agency's name indicates its original military purpose (see ordnance and surveying), which was to map Scotland in the wake of the Jacobite rising of 1745. There was also a more general and nationwide need in light of the potential threat of invasion during the Napoleonic Wars. Ordnance Survey mapping is usually classified as either "large-scale" (in other words, more detailed) or "small-scale". The Survey's large-scale mapping comprises 1:2,500 maps for urban areas and 1:10,000 more generally
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