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List Of Seaplanes And Flying Boats
The following is a list of seaplanes and amphibious aircraft, which includes floatplanes and flying boats, by country of origin. Seaplanes are any aircraft that has the capability of landing on water while amphibious aircraft are equipped with wheels to alight on land, as well as being able to land on the water. Flying boats rely on the fuselage or hull for buoyancy, while floatplanes rely on external pontoons or floats
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Canadair CL-215
The Canadair
Canadair
CL-215 (Scooper) was the first model in a series of firefighting flying boat amphibious aircraft built by Canadair
Canadair
and later Bombardier. The CL-215 is a twin-engine, high-wing aircraft designed to operate well at low speeds and in high gust-loading environments, as are found over forest fires.Contents1 Design and development 2 Variants 3 Operators3.1 Former operators4 Accidents and incidents 5 Aircraft on display 6 Specifications (CL-215) 7 See also 8 References8.1 Notes 8.2 Bibliography9 External linksDesign and development[edit]The "bomb door" from which the water is droppedThe CL-215 can be traced back to two early projects by Canadair, the CL-43 and CL-204
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Found Centennial
The Found Centennial 100
Found Centennial 100
is a Canadian four/five-seat cabin monoplane produced by Found Brothers Aviation.Contents1 Design and development 2 Specifications (Centennial) 3 References 4 See alsoDesign and development[edit] The Centennial 100 was developed as an improved version of the Found FBA-2. Design work started in October 1966 and the prototype first flew on 7 April 1967. The aircraft is powered by a 290 hp (216 kW) Avco Lycoming IO-540-G1D5 engine. Three prototypes and two production aircraft were built and were used to gain certification for the type in July 1968. No further aircraft were built as the company went out of business. Specifications (Centennial)[edit] Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1969-70 [1] General characteristicsCrew: 1 Length: 25 ft 6 in (7.77 m) Wingspan: 39 ft 0 in (11.89 m) Height: 8 ft 4 in (2.54 m) Wing area: 196.6 ft² (18.26 m²) Empty weight: 2,000 lb (907 kg) Max
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De Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver
The de Havilland Canada
Canada
DHC-2 Beaver
Beaver
is a single-engined high-wing propeller-driven short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft developed and manufactured by de Havilland Canada. It has been primarily operated as a bush plane and has been used for wide variety of utility roles, such as cargo and passenger hauling, aerial application (crop dusting and aerial topdressing), and civil aviation duties. Shortly after the end of the Second World War, de Havilland Canada made the decision to orient itself towards civilian operators. Based upon feedback from pilots, the company decided that the envisioned aircraft should have excellent STOL
STOL
performance, all-metal construction, and accommodate many features sought by the operators of bush planes. On 16 August 1947, the maiden flight of the aircraft, which had received the designation DHC-2 Beaver, took place
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Bushplane
A bush airplane is a general aviation aircraft used to provide both scheduled and unscheduled passenger and freight services to remote, undeveloped areas, such as the Canadian north or bush, Alaskan tundra, the African bush, or the Australian Outback. They are used where ground transportation infrastructure is inadequate or does not exist.[1]Contents1 Common traits 2 Current and historical bush planes 3 Appearances in the media 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksCommon traits[edit] Since a bush plane is defined by how it is used, a wide variety of different aircraft with different configurations have been used over the years as such. Experience has, however, shown certain traits to be desirable, and so they appear frequently, especially on aircraft specifically designed as bush planes
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De Havilland Canada DHC-3 Otter
The de Havilland Canada
Canada
DHC-3 Otter is a single-engined, high-wing, propeller-driven, short take-off and landing (STOL) aircraft developed by de Havilland Canada. It was conceived to be capable of performing the same roles as the earlier and highly successful Beaver, including as a bush plane, but is overall a larger aircraft.Contents1 Design and development 2 Operational use2.1 Modifications3 Variants 4 Military operators 5 Civil operators 6 Accidents 7 Specifications (landplane) 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksDesign and development[edit] The rugged single-engined, high-wing, propeller-driven DHC-3 Otter was conceived in January 1951 by de Havilland Canada
Canada
as a larger, more powerful version of its highly successful DHC2 Beaver STOL
STOL
utility transport
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De Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter
The de Havilland Canada
Canada
DHC-6 Twin Otter, currently marketed as the Viking Air
Viking Air
DHC-6 Twin Otter, is a Canadian 19-passenger STOL
STOL
(Short Takeoff and Landing) utility aircraft developed by de Havilland Canada and currently produced by Viking Air. The aircraft's fixed tricycle undercarriage, STOL
STOL
capabilities, twin turboprop engines and high rate of climb have made it a successful commuter passenger airliner as well as a cargo and medevac aircraft
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Fairchild 82
The Fairchild 82
Fairchild 82
and the 34-42 Niska were a family of utility aircraft produced in Canada in the mid-1930s, based on designs by Fairchild Aircraft Ltd. (Canada)'s parent company in the United States.Contents1 Design and development 2 Operational history 3 Variants 4 Operators 5 Specifications (82A) 6 References 7 External linksDesign and development[edit] In 1929-1930, Fairchild (Canada) designed an eight-seat transport known as the Model 81. The single prototype was powered by either a 575 hp Pratt & Whitney Hornet or an Armstrong Siddeley Jaguar. The design was a "one-off" and did not enter production.[1] In 1934, the parent company had also developed the Super 71 variant of the Fairchild 71, but reception in the marketplace was lukewarm. Undaunted, the company continued to refine the design and produced the Model 82 the following year
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Fairchild F-11 Husky
The Fairchild F-11 Husky
Fairchild F-11 Husky
was a Canadian bush plane designed and manufactured in the post- Second World War
Second World War
era. Despite a promising design, a lack of a suitable powerplant hurt performance, and stiff competition from the de Havilland Beaver and de Havilland Otter designs meant the type never gained a solid foothold in the marketplace.Contents1 Design and development 2 Operational history2.1 Bush pilot endorsement3 Survivors 4 Variants 5 Specifications (F-11-1 Husky floatplane) 6 See also 7 References7.1 Notes 7.2 Bibliography8 External linksDesign and development[edit] With the end of its wartime contracts in 1945, Fairchild ventured back into familiar territory with the design and manufactures of a modern bush plane, the F-11 Husky. Fairchild Aircraft
Fairchild Aircraft
Ltd. (Canada) (Montreal) under the new Fairchild Industries Ltd
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Fairchild Sekani
The Fairchild 45-80
Fairchild 45-80
Sekani
Sekani
(named for an indigenous people of Canada) was a Canadian twin-engined transport aircraft developed in Canada
Canada
in the late 1930s
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Fairchild Super 71
The Fairchild Super 71
Fairchild Super 71
was a Canadian parasol-mounted high-wing monoplane cargo aircraft built by Fairchild Aircraft
Fairchild Aircraft
Ltd. (Canada). The Super 71 was an entirely new design that was the first "purpose-built" civilian bush plane for use in remote and northern locales in Canada.[1] Fairchild Super 71
Fairchild Super 71
modelContents1 Design and development 2 Operational history 3 Variants 4 Operators 5 Specifications (Super 71) 6 See also 7 References7.1 Notes 7.2 Bibliography8 External linksDesign and development[edit] In 1933, the Fairchild Aircraft
Fairchild Aircraft
Company undertook a study of new designs based on their Model 71
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Fleet 50 Freighter
The Fleet 50 Freighter was a Canadian twin-engine biplane general utility aircraft designed and built by Fleet Aircraft. This peculiar-looking aircraft had promise as a freighter and general use aircraft, but it was underpowered and only five were built. Development[edit] Design was started in 1936 to create a general purpose twin-engined utility aircraft for the Canadian market. It was designed as a short take-off freighter with features added to ease cargo handling. The Freighter was a biplane with the lower wing an inverted gull wing with either a float or wheel landing gear. Two radial piston engines were mounted in nacelles on the upper wing panels. The fuselage structure was welded steel tubing with duralumin formers, and a semi-monocoque duralumin nose section. The wings were stressed-skin metal structure on the inboard panels and fabric-covered wood beams and duralumin ribs on the outboard panels. The fuselage had room for two crew and up to ten passengers
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Fleet 80 Canuck
The Fleet Model 80 Canuck is a Canadian light aircraft featuring two seats in side-by-side configuration. The Canuck was designed for the flight training, personal use and light commercial roles. A total of 225 Canucks were built by two manufacturers during its thirteen-year production run, with the majority being built by Fleet Aircraft between 1945 and 1947.Contents1 Design and development 2 Operational history 3 Aircraft
Aircraft
on display 4 Variants 5 Specifications 6 Similar Aircraft 7 References 8 External linksDesign and development[edit] The Canuck originated with the Noury N-75, designed by Bob Noury which first flew in 1944 at Mount Hope, Ontario. The "home-built" N-75 was a conventional high-wing monoplane design with a welded-steel fuselage and tail surfaces with fabric covering, looking not unlike a Piper Cub
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Found FBA-1
The Found FBA-1 was a 1940s Canadian four-seat cabin monoplane produced by Found Brothers Aviation. Design and development[edit] Found Brothers Aviation was formed in 1946 to produce a new design by Captain S.R. Found, the Found FBA-1A. The FBA-1 was a high-wing monoplane powered by a 140 hp (104 kW) de Havilland Gipsy Major engine, designed from its inception to be operated on wheels, tundra tires, skis and on floats.[1] The aircraft first flew on 13 July 1949
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Canadian Vickers Vanessa
The Canadian Vickers
Canadian Vickers
Vanessa was a Canadian biplane transport seaplane of the 1920s. It was a single-engine, twin-float biplane of mixed construction, evaluated by the Royal Canadian Air Force
Royal Canadian Air Force
(RCAF)and used for experimental air-mail services..Contents1 Design and development 2 Testing 3 Specifications (Vanessa - Lynx engine) 4 References 5 Further readingDesign and development[edit] The Vanessa was developed as a private venture commercial seaplane. The Canadian Vickers
Canadian Vickers
Chief Engineer based his design on the contemporary Stinson cabin biplane which had been introduced in the United States. The one feature that was a departure from the Stinson was the use of interplane struts which formed an "X" (when viewed from the front), thus eliminating the need for traditional wire bracing and allowing easy access to the cabin
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Found FBA-2
The Found FBA-2
Found FBA-2
is a 1960s Canadian four/five-seat cabin monoplane that was produced by Found Aircraft.Contents1 Design and development1.1 Expedition E3502 Variants 3 Specifications (FBA-2C) 4 ReferencesDesign and development[edit] The Found FBA-2
Found FBA-2
is an all-metal development of the company's first design, the Found FBA-1. The prototype first flew on 11 August 1960. It is a high-wing monoplane with a fixed tricycle undercarriage. The production version was to be the Found FBA-2B but the aircraft was produced with a conventional tail-wheel landing gear as the Found FBA-2C. The first production FBA-2C first flew on 9 May 1962. It is powered by an Avco Lycoming O-540-A1D engine and had a slightly longer cabin and enlarged cabin doors than the prototype. Originally, float or ski landing gear was available through third parties, and later became a factory option
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