HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

List Of Celtic Deities
The Celtic pantheon
Celtic pantheon
is known from a variety of sources such as written Celtic mythology, ancient places of worship, statues, engravings, religious objects, and place or personal names. The Celtic pantheon has over 1,200 named deities; a comprehensive list is difficult to assemble. Celtic deities
Celtic deities
can belong to two categories: general deities and local deities. "General deities" were known by Celts
Celts
throughout large regions, and are the gods and goddesses invoked for protection, healing, luck, and honour. The "local deities" that embodied Celtic nature worship were the spirits of a particular feature of the landscape, such as mountains, trees, or rivers, and thus were generally only known by the locals in the surrounding areas.[1] After Celtic lands became Christianised, there were attempts by Christian writers to euhemerize or even demonize the pre-Christian deities
[...More...]

"List Of Celtic Deities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Celtic Sacred Trees
Many types of trees found in the Celtic nations
Celtic nations
are considered to be sacred, whether as symbols, or due to medicinal properties, or because they are seen as the abode of particular nature spirits. Historically and in folklore, the respect given to trees varies in different parts of the Celtic world. On the Isle of Man, the phrase 'fairy tree' often refers to the elder tree.[1] The medieval Welsh poem Cad Goddeu (The Battle of the Trees) is believed to contain Celtic tree lore, possibly relating to the crann ogham, the branch of the ogham alphabet where tree names are used as mnemonic devices."The Druid
Druid
Grove" (1845)Contents1 List of trees1.1 Oak 1.2 Ash 1.3 Apple 1.4 Hazel 1.5 Alder 1.6 Elder 1.7 Yew2 ReferencesList of trees[edit] Oak[edit] The oak tree features prominently in many Celtic cultures
[...More...]

"Celtic Sacred Trees" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gŵyl Fair Y Canhwyllau
Gŵyl Fair y Canhwyllau (English, "Mary's Festival of the Candles") is a Welsh name of Candlemas, celebrated on 2 February. It is the Welsh equivalent of the Goidelic
Goidelic
holiday of Imbolc. It was derived from the pre-Reformation ceremony of blessing the candles and distributing them to be carried in a procession. However, just as this Christian ceremony drew on pagan festivals connected with the coming of the Spring, some of the old practices that carried on in parts of Wales until the 20th Century suggest older rituals. The festival of early Spring is not connected with Saint Brigid of Kildare, as it is in Scotland and Ireland, however. Customs[edit]The period of time when working by candlelight was allowed, due to it being the dark part of the year, was amser gwylad, the time of keeping vigil
[...More...]

"Gŵyl Fair Y Canhwyllau" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shapeshifting
In mythology, folklore and speculative fiction, shapeshifting is the ability of a being or creature to completely transform its physical form or shape. This is usually achieved through an inherent ability of a mythological creature, divine intervention, or the use of magic. The idea of shapeshifting is present in the oldest forms of totemism and shamanism, as well as the oldest extant literature and epic poems, including works such as the Epic of Gilgamesh
Epic of Gilgamesh
and the Iliad, where the shapeshifting is usually induced by the act of a deity. The idea persisted through the Middle Ages, where the agency causing shapeshifting is usually a sorcerer or witch, and into the modern period. It remains a common trope in modern fantasy, children's literature, and works of popular culture. The most common form of shapeshifting myths is that of therianthropy, which is the transformation of a human being into an animal or conversely, of an animal into human form
[...More...]

"Shapeshifting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Coventina
Coventina
Coventina
was a Romano-British
Romano-British
goddess of wells and springs. She is known from multiple inscriptions at one site in Northumberland
Northumberland
county of England, an area surrounding a wellspring near Carrawburgh
Carrawburgh
on Hadrian's Wall. It is possible that other inscriptions, two from Hispania
Hispania
and one from Narbonensis, refer to Coventina, but this is disputed.[1] Contents1 The Well 2 Statues 3 Inscriptions 4 Literary references 5 References 6 External linksThe Well[edit]Standing stone marking the site of Coventina's WellDedications to Coventina
Coventina
and votive deposits were found in a walled area which had been built to contain the outflow from a spring now called "Coventina's Well"
[...More...]

"Coventina" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Féth Fíada
Féth fíada (Irish: féth fíada, féth fiada, feth fiadha, fé fíada, faeth fiadha), in Irish mythology
Irish mythology
is a magic mist or veil which the Tuatha Dé Danann
[...More...]

"Féth Fíada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Loathly Lady
The Loathly Lady (Motif D732 in Stith Thompson index), is an archetype commonly used in medieval literature, most famously in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Wife of Bath's Tale.[1] The motif is that of a woman who appears unattractive (ugly, loathly) but undergoes a transformation upon being approached by a man in spite of her unattractiveness, becoming extremely desirable
[...More...]

"Loathly Lady" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Imbas Forosnai
Imbas forosnai, is a gift of clairvoyance or visionary ability practiced by the gifted poets of ancient Ireland. In Old Irish, Imbas imeans "inspiration," and specifically refers to the sacred poetic inspiration believed to be possessed by the fili (Old Irish: inspired, visionary poets) in Early Ireland. Forosnai means "illuminated" or "that which illuminates". Descriptions of the practices associated with Imbas forosnai are found in Cormac's Glossary and in the mythology associated with the hero Fionn mac Cumhaill. Imbas forosnai involved the practitioner engaging in sensory deprivation techniques in order to enter a trance and receive answers or prophecy. In the Celtic traditions, poetry has always served as a primary conveyance of spiritual truth
[...More...]

"Imbas Forosnai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Curadmír
The Curadmír or Champion's Portion[1] was an ancient custom referred to in early Irish literature, whereby the warrior acknowledged as the bravest present at a feast was given precedence and awarded the choicest cut of meat. This was often disputed violently. The custom appears most often in the legends of the Ulster Cycle. It is paralled by historical customs of the ancient Celts of continental Europe, as recorded by classical writers.Contents1 The Story of Mac Dá Tho's Pig 2 Fled Bricrenn 3 Classical references 4 In fiction 5 ReferencesThe Story of Mac Dá Tho's Pig[edit] The Ulster Cycle saga Scéla Mucce Meic Dá Thó ("The Story of Mac Dá Tho's Pig") features a dispute over the Champion's Portion between warriors of Ulster and Connacht who are guests at a feast in Leinster. They dispute it by boasting of their previous heroic deeds, and eventually the Connacht hero Cet mac Mágach is acknowledged as the bravest man present
[...More...]

"Curadmír" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Celtic Otherworld
In Celtic mythology, the Otherworld is the realm of the deities and possibly also of the dead. In Gaelic and Brittonic mythology it is usually described as a supernatural realm of everlasting youth, beauty, health, abundance and joy.[1] The Otherworld is usually elusive, but various mythical heroes visit it either through chance or after being invited by one of its residents
[...More...]

"Celtic Otherworld" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Samhain
Samhain
Samhain
(/ˈsɑːwɪn, ˈsaʊɪn/; Irish: [sˠəuɪnʲ]) is a Gaelic festival marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the "darker half" of the year. Traditionally, it is celebrated from 31 October to 1 November, as the Celtic day began and ended at sunset. This is about halfway between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice. It is one of the four Gaelic seasonal festivals, along with Imbolc, Bealtaine
Bealtaine
and Lughnasadh. Historically, it was widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man
[...More...]

"Samhain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Calan Gaeaf
Calan Gaeaf
Calan Gaeaf
is the name of the first day of winter in Wales, observed on 1 November.[1] The night before is Nos Galan Gaeaf[1] or Noson Galan Gaeaf, an Ysbrydnos when spirits are abroad
[...More...]

"Calan Gaeaf" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Threefold Death
The threefold death, which is suffered by kings, heroes, and gods, is a putatively Proto-Indo-European theme, reconstructed from medieval accounts of Celtic and Germanic mythology
Germanic mythology
and archaeologically attested from ancient bodies such as Lindow Man. Some proponents of the trifunctional hypothesis distinguish two types of threefold deaths in Indo-European myth and ritual. In the first type of threefold death, one person dies simultaneously in three ways. He dies by hanging (or strangulation or falling from a tree), by drowning (or poison), and by wounding
[...More...]

"Threefold Death" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Wasteland (mythology)
The Wasteland is a Celtic motif that ties the barrenness of a land with a curse that must be lifted by a hero. It occurs in Irish mythology and French Grail romances, and hints of it may be found in the Welsh Mabinogion. An example from Irish literature
Irish literature
occurs in the Echtrae Airt meic Cuinn (Echtra, or adventure in the Otherworld, of Art mac Cuinn). Recorded in the 14th century but likely taken from an older oral tradition, Echtrae Airt meic Cuinn is nominally about Art, though the adventures of his father Conn of the Hundred Battles take up the first part of the narrative. Conn is High King of Ireland, but his land turns to waste when he marries the wicked Bé Chuma, an unacceptable action for the king
[...More...]

"Wasteland (mythology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ulster Cycle
The Ulster
Ulster
Cycle (Irish: an Rúraíocht),[1] formerly known as the Red Branch Cycle, one of the four great cycles of Irish mythology, is a body of medieval Irish heroic legends and sagas of the traditional heroes of the Ulaid
Ulaid
in what is now eastern Ulster
Ulster
and northern Leinster, particularly counties Armagh, Down and Louth, and taking place around or before the 1st century AD.Contents1 Ulster
Ulster
Cycle stories 2 Texts 3 Texts in translation3.1 Online translations4 Adaptations 5 See also 6 References 7 External links Ulster
Ulster
Cycle stories[edit] The Ulster
Ulster
Cycle stories are set in and around the reign of King Conchobar mac Nessa, who rules the Ulaid
Ulaid
from Emain Macha
Macha
(now Navan Fort near Armagh)
[...More...]

"Ulster Cycle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Calan Mai
Calan Mai
Calan Mai
([ˈkalan ˈmaɪ̯] "Calend (first day) of May") or Calan Haf ([ˈkalan ˈhaːv] "Calend of Summer") is a May Day
May Day
holiday of Wales
Wales
held on 1 May
[...More...]

"Calan Mai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.