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List Of Wrongful Convictions In The United States
This is a list of wrongful convictions in the United States. This list includes people who have been legally exonerated, including people whose convictions have been overturned and have not been retried, as well as people who have not been formally exonerated but are widely considered to be factually innocent. This list is not exhaustive and represents only exonerees who currently have articles. Crime descriptions with an asterisk (*) indicate that the events were later determined not to be criminal acts.Contents1 Before 1900 2 1900s 3 1910s 4 1920s 5 1930s 6 1940s 7 1950s 8 1960s 9 1970s 10 1980s 11 1990s 12 2000s 13 See also 14 References 15 External linksBefore 1900[edit]Date of crime Defendant(s) Crime Location Sentence Time served Legally exonerated1673 Thomas Cornell Jr
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Thomas Cornell (settler)
Thomas Cornell, Sr (c. 1595 – c. 1655) was one of the earliest settlers of Boston
Boston
(1638), Rhode Island
Rhode Island
(1643) and the Bronx and a contemporary of Roger Williams and the family of Anne Hutchinson. He is the ancestor of a number of Americans prominent in business, politics, and education.Contents1 Biography 2 Murder Trial of Thomas Cornell Jr. 3 Notable descendants 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Cornell born, was christened 24 March 1591/92 in Saffron Walden, Essex, England
England
and died in Portsmouth, Rhode Island
Rhode Island
on 8 February 1654/55. He married Rebecca Briggs, born in 1600, on 9 June 1620 at St Mary The Virgin, Saffron Walden. Their eldest son also named Thomas Cornell (Jr.) was born October, 1627 in Saffron Walden, Essex, England
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Nisqually People
The Nisqually (ˌnɪsˈkwɔːliː) is a Lushootseed-speaking Native American tribe in western Washington state in the United States. They are a Southern Coast Salish people.[1] They are federally recognized as the Nisqually Indian Tribe, formerly known as the Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually Reservation and the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation. The tribe lives on a reservation in the Nisqually River
Nisqually River
valley near the river delta. The Nisqually Indian Reservation, at 47°01′12″N 122°39′27″W / 47.02000°N 122.65750°W / 47.02000; -122.65750, comprises 20.602 km² (7.955 sq mi) of land area on both sides of the river, in western Pierce County and eastern Thurston County
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Roman Catholic
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
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Immigrant
Immigration
Immigration
is the international movement of people into a destination country of which they are not natives or where they do not possess citizenship in order to settle or reside there, especially as permanent residents or naturalized citizens, or to take up employment as a migrant worker or temporarily as a foreign worker.[1][2][3] As for economic effects, research suggests that migration is beneficial both to the receiving and sending countries. Research, with few exceptions, finds that immigration on average has positive economic effects on the native population, but is mixed as to whether low-skilled immigration adversely affects low-skilled natives. Studies show that the elimination of barriers to migration would have profound effects on world GDP, with estimates of gains ranging between 67 and 147 percent
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Cranston, Rhode Island
Cranston, once known as Pawtuxet, is a city in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. With a population of 80,529 at the 2010 census, it is the third largest city in the state. The center of population of Rhode Island
Rhode Island
is located in Cranston.[3] Cranston is a part of the Providence metropolitan area. Cranston was named one of the "100 Best Places to Live" in the United States by Money magazine in 2006.[4] It is among the top 25 safest cities in the country, according to CQ Press's research. According to the survey done by 24/7 Wall St website, Cranston ranked 36th on the list of “America’s 50 Best Cities to Live”[5] The Town of Cranston was created in 1754 from a portion of Providence north of the Pawtuxet River
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Textile
A textile[1] is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread). Yarn
Yarn
is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, hemp, or other materials to produce long strands.[2] Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or felting. The related words fabric[3] and cloth[4] are often used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. A textile is any material made of interlacing fibres, including carpeting and geotextiles. A fabric is a material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.)
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Job Durfee
Job Durfee (September 20, 1790 – July 26, 1847) was a politician and jurist from Rhode Island. Born at Tiverton, he graduated from Brown University in 1813 and was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Tiverton. He was a member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives from 1816 to 1820, and was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Seventeenth Congress and was reelected as an Adams-Clay Republican to the Eighteenth Congress, serving from March 4, 1821 to March 3, 1825. He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1824 to the Nineteenth Congress and for election in 1828 to the Twenty-first Congress; he was again a member of the State house of representatives from 1826 to 1829, serving as speaker from 1827 to 1829. He declined to be a candidate for reelection and resumed the practice of law; in 1833 he was elected associate justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court. He was chief justice from June 1835 until his death in Tiverton in 1847
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Lincoln Chafee
Lincoln Davenport Chafee (/ˈtʃeɪfiː/; born March 26, 1953) is an American politician from the state of Rhode Island. He was mayor of Warwick from 1993 to 1999, a United States Senator
United States Senator
from 1999 to 2007, and the 74th Governor of Rhode Island
Governor of Rhode Island
from 2011 to 2015. He has been a member of the Democratic Party since 2013, having previously been a Republican Party member until 2007 and an independent in the interim. The son of Republican politician John Chafee, who was the 66th Governor of Rhode Island, the United States Secretary of the Navy, and a U.S. Senator from Rhode Island, Lincoln Chafee's first elected office was as a member of the Warwick City Council in 1985
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Olympia, Washington
Olympia is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Washington and the county seat of Thurston County.[6] It was incorporated on January 28, 1859. The population was 46,478 as of the 2010 census, making it the 24th largest city in the state, and the least prominent state capital in the United States. The city borders Lacey to the east and Tumwater to the south. Olympia is a cultural center of the southern Puget Sound region
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San Patricio, Texas
Texas
Texas
(/ˈtɛksəs/, locally /-sɪz/; Spanish: Texas
Texas
or Tejas [ˈtexas]) is the second largest state in the United States
United States
by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas
Texas
shares borders with the U.S
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Capital Punishment In Rhode Island
Rhode Island was one of the earliest states in the United States to abolish capital punishment, having abolished it for all crimes in 1852. The death penalty was reintroduced in 1872, but it was never carried out before being abolished again in 1984. Of all the states, Rhode Island has had the longest period with no executions, none having taken place since 1845. Rhode Island performed 52 executions from 1673 to February 13, 1845, but only seven took place after statehood. Half of the executions occurred on July 19, 1723, when 26 sailors were hanged for piracy. Rhode Island has never executed a female offender.[1] Hanging was the most commonly used form of execution; five executions were carried out by an unknown method. Gas inhalation was authorized after 1973, but it was never used
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Liberty, Nebraska
Liberty is a village in Gage County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 76 at the 2010 census.Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics2.1 2010 census 2.2 2000 census3 History 4 Notable people 5 ReferencesGeography[edit] Liberty is located at 40°5′6″N 96°29′0″W / 40.08500°N 96.48333°W / 40.08500; -96.48333 (40.085028, -96.483336).[6] According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.25 square miles (0.65 km2), all of it land.[1] Demographics[edit]Historical populationCensus Pop.%±1880 27—1890 4691,637.0%1900 450−4.1%1910 394−12.4%1920 375−4.8%1930 348−7.2%1940 340−2.3%1950 246−27.6%1960 174−29.3%1970 118−32.2%1980 105−11.0%1990 74−29.5%2000 8616.2%2010 76−11.6%Est. 2016 75 [3] −1.3%U.S
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Haymarket Affair
The Haymarket affair
Haymarket affair
(also known as the Haymarket massacre or Haymarket riot) was the aftermath of a bombing that took place at a labor demonstration on Tuesday, May 4, 1886, at Haymarket Square[2] in Chicago. It began as a peaceful rally in support of workers striking for an eight-hour day and in reaction to the killing of several workers the previous day by the police. An unknown person threw a dynamite bomb at police as they acted to disperse the public meeting. The bomb blast and ensuing gunfire resulted in the deaths of seven police officers and at least four civilians; six score others were wounded. In the internationally publicized legal proceedings that followed, eight anarchists were convicted of conspiracy. The evidence was that one of the defendants may have built the bomb, but none of those on trial had thrown it.[3][4][5][6] Seven were sentenced to death and one to a term of 15 years in prison
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Chicago
Chicago
Chicago
(/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ, -ˈkɔː-/ ( listen)), officially the City
City
of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States. With over 2.7 million residents, it is also the most populous city in both the state of Illinois
Illinois
and the Midwestern United States. It is the county seat of Cook County
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