HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

List Of U.S. States And Territories By Area
This is a complete list of the states of the United States
United States
and its major territories ordered by total area, land area, and water area. The water area numbers include inland waters, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and territorial waters
[...More...]

"List Of U.S. States And Territories By Area" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Territories Of The United States
Territories of the United States
United States
are sub-national administrative divisions directly overseen by the United States
United States
(U.S.) federal government. Unlike U.S. states
U.S. states
and Native tribes that have sovereignty alongside the federal government, territories are without sovereignty (according to a 2016 Supreme Court
Supreme Court
ruling called Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico
v. Sanchez Valle).[2] The territories are classified by whether they are "incorporated" (i.e., part of the U.S. proper) and whether they have an "organized" government through an Organic Act
Organic Act
passed by the U.S. Congress.[3] The U.S
[...More...]

"Territories Of The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Inland Waters
According to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, a nation's internal waters include waters on the landward side of the baseline of a nation's territorial waters, except in archipelagic states.[1] It includes waterways such as rivers and canals, and sometimes the water within small bays. In inland waters, sovereignty of the state is equal to that which it exercises on the mainland. The coastal state is free to make laws relating to its internal waters, regulate any use, and use any resource
[...More...]

"Inland Waters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Coastal Waters
Territorial waters
Territorial waters
or a territorial sea, as defined by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea,[1] is a belt of coastal waters extending at most 12 nautical miles (22.2 km; 13.8 mi) from the baseline (usually the mean low-water mark) of a coastal state
[...More...]

"Coastal Waters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Great Lakes
The Great Lakes
Great Lakes
(French: les Grands-Lacs), also called the Laurentian Great Lakes[1] and the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
of North America, are a series of interconnected freshwater lakes located primarily in the upper mid-east region of North America, on the Canada–United States border, which connect to the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
through the Saint Lawrence River
[...More...]

"Great Lakes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Territorial Waters
Territorial waters
Territorial waters
or a territorial sea, as defined by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea,[1] is a belt of coastal waters extending at most 12 nautical miles (22.2 km; 13.8 mi) from the baseline (usually the mean low-water mark) of a coastal state
[...More...]

"Territorial Waters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Glaciers
A glacier (US: /ˈɡleɪʃər/ or UK: /ˈɡlæsiə/) is a persistent body of dense ice that is constantly moving under its own weight; it forms where the accumulation of snow exceeds its ablation (melting and sublimation) over many years, often centuries. Glaciers slowly deform and flow due to stresses induced by their weight, creating crevasses, seracs, and other distinguishing features. They also abrade rock and debris from their substrate to create landforms such as cirques and moraines. Glaciers form only on land and are distinct from the much thinner sea ice and lake ice that form on the surface of bodies of water. On Earth, 99% of glacial ice is contained within vast ice sheets in the polar regions, but glaciers may be found in mountain ranges on every continent including Oceania's high-latitude oceanic islands such as New Zealand
New Zealand
and Papua New Guinea
[...More...]

"Glaciers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

U.S. State
A state is a constituent political entity of the United States. There are currently 50 states, which are bound together in a union with each other. Each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the United States federal government. Due to the shared sovereignty between each state and the federal government, Americans
Americans
are citizens of both the federal republic and of the state in which they reside.[3] State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons covered by certain types of court orders (e.g., paroled convicts and children of divorced spouses who are sharing custody)
[...More...]

"U.S. State" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nebraska
Welcome to NEBRASKAland where the West begins[5]Soil Holdrege seriesSong "Beautiful Nebraska"Other River: Platte RiverState route markerState quarterReleased in 2006Lists of United States
United States
state symbols Nebraska
Nebraska
/nɪˈbræskə/ ( listen) is a state that lies in both the Great Plains
Great Plains
and the Midwestern United States. It is bordered by South Dakota
South Dakota
to the north, Iowa
Iowa
to the east and Missouri
Missouri
to the southeast, both across the Missouri
Missouri
River, Kansas
Kansas
to the south, Colorado
Colorado
to the southwest and Wyoming
Wyoming
to the west. It is the only triply landlocked U.S. state. Nebraska's area is just over 77,220 square miles (200,000 km2) with almost 1.9 million people
[...More...]

"Nebraska" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
[...More...]

"New York (state)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

California
Native languages as of 2007English 57.4%[2] Spanish 28.5%[3] Chinese 2.8%[3] Filipino 2.2%[3]Demonym CalifornianCapital SacramentoLargest city Los AngelesLargest metro Greater Los Angeles
Los Angeles
AreaArea Ranked 3rd • Total 163,696 sq mi (423,970 km2) • Width 250 miles (400 km) • Length 770 miles (1,240 km) • % water 4.7 • Latitude 32°32′ N to 42° N • Longitude 114°8′ W to 124°26′ W
[...More...]

"California" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Virginia
Virginia
Virginia
(/vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen); officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern[6] and Mid-Atlantic[7] regions of the United States
United States
located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains. Virginia
Virginia
is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as the first English colonial possession established in mainland North America,[8] and "Mother of Presidents" because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains
Blue Ridge Mountains
and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach
Virginia Beach
is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision
[...More...]

"Virginia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mississippi
Mississippi
Mississippi
(/ˌmɪsɪˈsɪpi/ ( listen)) is a state in the Southern United States, with part of its southern border formed by the Gulf of Mexico. Its western border is formed by the Mississippi
Mississippi
River. The state has a population of approximately 3 million. It is the 32nd most extensive and the 32nd most populous of the 50 United States. Located in the center of the state, Jackson is the state capital and largest city, with a population of approximately 175,000 people. The state is heavily forested outside of the Mississippi Delta
Mississippi Delta
area, between the Mississippi
Mississippi
and Yazoo rivers. Before the American Civil War, most development in the state was along riverfronts, where slaves worked on cotton plantations. After the war, the bottomlands to the interior were cleared, mostly by freedmen
[...More...]

"Mississippi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

North Carolina
As of 2000English 90.70% Spanish 6.18%[2]Demonym North Carolinian (official); Tar Heel
Tar Heel
(colloquial)Capital RaleighLargest city CharlotteLargest metro Charlotte
[...More...]

"North Carolina" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Arkansas
Arkansas
Arkansas
(/ˈɑːrkənsɔː/ AR-kən-saw)[c] is a state in the southeastern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2017.[7][8] Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians.[9] The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas
Arkansas
Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and the Arkansas
Arkansas
Delta. Arkansas
Arkansas
is the 29th largest by area and the 33rd most populous of the 50 United States. The capital and most populous city is Little Rock, located in the central portion of the state, a hub for transportation, business, culture, and government
[...More...]

"Arkansas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Iowa
Iowa
Iowa
(/ˈaɪ.əwə/ ( listen))[6][7][8] is a U.S. state
U.S. state
in the Midwestern United States, bordered by the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
to the east and the Missouri
Missouri
and Big Sioux
Sioux
rivers to the west
[...More...]

"Iowa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.