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List Of Governors Of Virginia
The following is a list of the Governors of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The Governor is the head of the executive branch of Virginia's state government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces. The governor has the duty to enforce state laws, and the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the Virginia General Assembly, to convene the legislature, and to grant pardons, except in cases of impeachment.[1] The first Constitution of 1776 created the office of Governor, to be elected annually by the Virginia
Virginia
State Legislature
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History Of Virginia
The History of Virginia
Virginia
begins with documentation by the first Spanish explorers to reach the area in the 1500s, when it was occupied chiefly by Algonquian, Iroquoian, and Siouan peoples. After a failed English attempt to settle Virginia
Virginia
in the 1580s by Walter Raleigh[citation needed], permanent English settlement began in Virginia
Virginia
with Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607. The Virginia Company
Virginia Company
colony was looking for gold but failed and the colonists could barely feed themselves. The famine during the harsh winter of 1609 forced the colonists to eat leather from their clothes and boots and resort to cannibalism.[1] The colony nearly failed until tobacco emerged as a profitable export. It was grown on plantations, using primarily indentured servants for the intensive hand labor involved. After 1662, the colony turned black slavery into a hereditary racial caste
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Impeachment
Impeachment
Impeachment
is the process by which a legislative body formally levels charges against a high official of government. Impeachment
Impeachment
does not necessarily mean removal from office; it is only a formal statement of charges, akin to an indictment in criminal law, and is thus only the first step towards removal. Once an individual is impeached, he or she must then face the possibility of conviction via legislative vote, which then entails the removal of the individual from office. Because impeachment and conviction of officials involve an overturning of the normal constitutional procedures by which individuals achieve high office (election, ratification, or appointment) and because it generally requires a supermajority, they are usually reserved for those deemed to have committed serious abuses of their office
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Federalist Party (United States)
The Federalist Party, referred to as the Pro-Administration Party until the 3rd United States Congress, was the first American political party. It existed from the early 1790s to 1816, though its remnants lasted into the 1820s. The Federalists called for a strong national government that promoted economic growth and fostered friendly relationships with Great Britain as well as opposition to revolutionary France. The party controlled the federal government until 1801, when it was overwhelmed by the Democratic-Republican
Democratic-Republican
opposition led by Thomas Jefferson. The Federalist Party
Federalist Party
came into being between 1792 and 1794 as a national coalition of bankers and businessmen in support of Alexander Hamilton's fiscal policies. These supporters developed into the organized Federalist Party, which was committed to a fiscally sound and nationalistic government
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David Jameson (governor)
David Jameson (1723 – July 10, 1793) was the acting Governor of Virginia for a short period of time in 1781. A native of Essex County, he served as lieutenant governor under Thomas Nelson, Jr.; in 1783 he entered the Virginia State Senate. He was acting governor briefly before the ascension of Benjamin Harrison V to the office. Jameson wed Mildred Smith, the marriage produced no children. References[edit] Biography at the National Governors AssociationThis article about a Virginia State Senator is a stub
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Virginia In The American Revolution
The history of Virginia in the American Revolution
Virginia in the American Revolution
begins with the role the Colony of Virginia
Colony of Virginia
played in early dissent against the British government and culminates with the defeat of General Cornwallis by the allied forces at the Siege of Yorktown
Siege of Yorktown
in 1781, an event signaled the effective military end to the conflict. Numerous Virginians played key roles in the Revolution, including George Washington, Patrick Henry, and Thomas Jefferson.Contents1 Antecedents 2 War begins 3 Independence 4 War returns to Virginia4.1 Raid of Richmond 4.2 Yorktown Campaign5 Legacy 6 See also 7 ReferencesAntecedents[edit]"The Alternative of Williamsburg", 2220, showing a satirical view of affairs in the colony of loyalists being intimidated to join the Virginia Association.History of VirginiaBy year Pre-statehood American Revolution U.S
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Independent Party (United States)
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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Republican Party (United States)
The Republican Party, commonly referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party. The party is named after republicanism, the dominant value during the American Revolution. Founded by anti-slavery activists, economic modernizers, ex Whigs and ex Free Soilers in 1854, the Republicans dominated politics nationally and in the majority of northern states for most of the period between 1860 and 1932.[16] The Republican Party originally championed classical liberal ideas, including anti-slavery and economic reforms.[17][18] The party was usually dominant over the Democrats during the Third Party System
Third Party System
and Fourth Party System. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
formed the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party after being rejected by the GOP and ran as a candidate
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Whig Party (United States)
The Whig Party was a political party active in the middle of the 19th century in the United States. Four United States
United States
Presidents belonged to the party while in office.[5] It emerged in the 1830s as the leading opponent of Jacksonians, pulling together former members of the National Republican (one of the successors of the Democratic-Republican Party) and the Anti-Masonic Party. It had links to the upscale traditions of the Federalist Party. Along with the rival Democratic Party, it was central to the Second Party System
Second Party System
from the early 1840s to the mid-1860s.[6] It originally formed in opposition to the policies of President Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson
(in office 1829–1837) and his Democratic Party
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Federalist Party
The Federalist Party, referred to as the Pro-Administration Party until the 3rd United States Congress, was the first American political party. It existed from the early 1790s to 1816, though its remnants lasted into the 1820s. The Federalists called for a strong national government that promoted economic growth and fostered friendly relationships with Great Britain as well as opposition to revolutionary France. The party controlled the federal government until 1801, when it was overwhelmed by the Democratic-Republican
Democratic-Republican
opposition led by Thomas Jefferson. The Federalist Party
Federalist Party
came into being between 1792 and 1794 as a national coalition of bankers and businessmen in support of Alexander Hamilton's fiscal policies. These supporters developed into the organized Federalist Party, which was committed to a fiscally sound and nationalistic government
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Hardin Burnley
Hardin Burnley (March 19, 1761 – March 11, 1809) was a Virginia lawyer and political figure who served in the Virginia House of Delegates and the Virginia Council of State. As President of the Council, Burnley was the acting Governor of Virginia for three days in 1799, pending the swearing in of James Monroe. References[edit] Biography at the National Governors AssociationThis article about a Virginia politician is a stub
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Edmund Pendleton
Edmund Pendleton
Edmund Pendleton
(September 9, 1721 – October 23, 1803) was a Virginia
Virginia
planter, politician, lawyer and judge. He served in the Virginia
Virginia
legislature before and during the American Revolutionary War, rising to the position of Speaker. Pendleton attended the First Continental Congress
Continental Congress
as one of Virginia's delegates alongside George Washington and Patrick Henry, and led the conventions both wherein Virginia
Virginia
declared independence (1776) and adopted the U.S. Constitution (1788). Unlike his sometime political rival Henry, Pendleton was a moderate who initially hoped for reconciliation, rather than revolt. With Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and George Wythe, Pendleton revised Virginia's legal code after the break with Britain
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Independent (politician)
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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Lieutenant Governor Of Virginia
The Lieutenant Governor is a constitutional officer of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The Lieutenant Governor is elected every four years along with the Governor and Attorney General. The office is currently held by Democrat Justin Fairfax. The governor and lieutenant governor are elected separately and thus may be of different political parties. The lieutenant governor's office is located in the Oliver Hill Building on Capitol Square in Richmond, Virginia. The lieutenant governor serves as the President of the Senate of Virginia
Virginia
and is first in the line of succession to the governor; in the event the governor dies, resigns, or otherwise leaves office, the lieutenant governor becomes governor
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Democratic Party (United States)
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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Pardon
A pardon is a government decision to allow a person who has been convicted of a crime to be free and absolved of that conviction, as if they were never convicted. Today, pardons are granted in many countries when individuals have demonstrated that they have paid their debt to society, or are otherwise considered to be deserving of them. Pardons are sometimes offered to persons who were either wrongfully convicted or who claim that they were wrongfully convicted. In some jurisdictions of som nations, accepting a pardon may implicitly constitute an admission of guilt; the offer is refused in some cases. Cases of wrongful conviction are nowadays more often dealt with by appeal rather than by pardon; however, a pardon is sometimes offered when innocence is undisputed in order to avoid the costs that are associated with a retrial
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