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List Of Compositions By Guillaume De Machaut
This article presents a complete list of the musical works of Guillaume de Machaut. Works are organized by genre. The numbering scheme, from the classic edition of Machaut's works by Leo Schrade, does not represent chronology, since few of Machaut's works can be reliably dated. Since many titles are merely the first lines of the texts used, in different sources individual pieces may be referred to by slightly different titles. For example, R20 is known both as "Douce dame" and "Douce dame tant qui vivray". Furthermore, some of Machaut's works (most notably the motets) employ simultaneous performance of several different texts. In such cases, the title of the work lists all texts used, starting from the top voice. Machaut was the first composer to concentrate on self-anthologization of his works, supervising the creation of three complete-works manuscripts during his life. In the last manuscript, written c. 1370, the scribe wrote "Vesci l'ordinance que G
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Intabulation
Intabulation, from the Italian word intavolatura, refers to an arrangement of a vocal or ensemble piece for keyboard, lute, or other plucked string instrument, written in tablature
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Virelais
A virelai is a form of medieval French verse used often in poetry and music. It is one of the three formes fixes (the others were the ballade and the rondeau) and was one of the most common verse forms set to music in Europe from the late thirteenth to the fifteenth centuries. One of the most famous composers of virelai is Guillaume de Machaut (c. 1300–1377), who also wrote his own verse; 33 separate compositions in the form survive by him. Other composers of virelai include Jehannot de l'Escurel, one of the earliest (d. 1304), and Guillaume Dufay (c
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Ars Nova
Ars nova
Ars nova
(Latin for new art)[2] refers to a musical style which flourished in France
France
and the Burgundian Low Countries in the Late Middle Ages: more particularly, in the period between the preparation of the Roman de Fauvel
Roman de Fauvel
(1310s) and the death of the composer Guillaume de Machaut in 1377. The term is sometimes used more generally to refer to all European polyphonic music of the 14th century. For instance, "Italian ars nova" is sometimes used to denote the music of Francesco Landini and his compatriots (although Trecento music is the more common term for music in Italy). The "ars" in "ars nova" can be read as "technique", or "style".[3] The term was first used in two musical treatises, titled Ars novae musicae (New Technique of Music) (c. 1320) by Johannes de Muris, and a collection of writings (c
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Machaut (crater)
Machaut is a crater on Mercury. It has a diameter of 106 kilometers.[1] Its name was adopted by the International Astronomical Union in 1976. Machaut is named for the French composer and poet Guillaume de Machaut, who lived from 1300 to 1377.[2] References[edit]^ Moore, Patrick (2000). The Data Book of Astronomy. Institute of Physics Publishing. ISBN 0-7503-0620-3.  ^ "Machaut". Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature. NASA
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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La Trobe University
La Trobe University
University
is an Australian, multi-campus, public research university with its flagship campus located in the Melbourne
Melbourne
suburb of Bundoora. The university was established in 1964, becoming the third university in the state of Victoria and the twelfth university in Australia. La Trobe is a verdant university and a member of the Innovative Research Universities. La Trobe's original and principal campus is located in the Melbourne metropolitan area, within the suburb of Bundoora. It is the largest metropolitan campus in the country.[Note 7] It has two other major campuses located in the regional Victorian city of Bendigo
Bendigo
and the twin border cities of Albury-Wodonga
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Chanson Baladée
A virelai is a form of medieval French verse used often in poetry and music. It is one of the three formes fixes (the others were the ballade and the rondeau) and was one of the most common verse forms set to music in Europe from the late thirteenth to the fifteenth centuries. One of the most famous composers of virelai is Guillaume de Machaut (c. 1300–1377), who also wrote his own verse; 33 separate compositions in the form survive by him. Other composers of virelai include Jehannot de l'Escurel, one of the earliest (d. 1304), and Guillaume Dufay (c
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Leo Schrade
Leo Schrade (13 December 1903 – 21 September 1964) was an American musicologist of German birth.Contents1 Biography 2 Selected bibliography2.1 Writings 2.2 Editions3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] He was born in Allenstein, East Prussia (today Olsztyn), then part of the German Empire. From 1923 he studied musicology in several universities—University of Heidelberg, University of Munich, and University of Leipzig—and also took courses at the Mannheim Conservatory. His teachers included Adolf Sandberger. He took the doctorate at the University of Leipzig in 1927, and then taught musicology first at the University of Königsberg, and then at the University of Bonn. Schrade's interests at the time lay mostly in early music: his Leipzig dissertation was on early organ music, and he completed the Habilitation in Königsberg in 1929 with a work on early instrumental music notation. Schrade left Germany for the USA in late 1930s
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Rondeau (forme Fixe)
A rondeau (plural rondeaux) is a form of medieval and Renaissance French poetry, as well as the corresponding musical chanson form. Together with the ballade and the virelai it was considered one of the three formes fixes, and one of the verse forms in France most commonly set to music between the late 13th and the 15th centuries. It is structured around a fixed pattern of repetition of material involving a refrain
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Virelai
A virelai is a form of medieval French verse used often in poetry and music. It is one of the three formes fixes (the others were the ballade and the rondeau) and was one of the most common verse forms set to music in Europe
Europe
from the late thirteenth to the fifteenth centuries. One of the most famous composers of virelai is Guillaume de Machaut (c. 1300–1377), who also wrote his own verse; 33 separate compositions in the form survive by him. Other composers of virelai include Jehannot de l'Escurel, one of the earliest (d. 1304), and Guillaume Dufay
Guillaume Dufay
(c
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Motets
In western music, a motet is a mainly vocal musical composition, of highly varied form and style, from the late medieval era to the present. The motet was one of the pre-eminent polyphonic forms of Renaissance music. According to Margaret Bent, "a piece of music in several parts with words" is as precise a definition of the motet as will serve from the 13th to the late 16th century and beyond.[1] The late 13th-century theorist Johannes de Grocheo believed that the motet was "not to be celebrated in the presence of common people, because they do not notice its subtlety, nor are they delighted in hearing it, but in the presence of the educated and of those who are seeking out subtleties in the arts".[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Medieval
Medieval
examples2.1 Medieval
Medieval
composers3 Renaissance examples3.1 Renaissance composers4 Baroque examples4.1 J.S
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Lai (poetic Form)
A lai (or lay lyrique, "lyric lay", to distinguish it from a lai breton) is a lyrical, narrative poem written in octosyllabic couplets that often deals with tales of adventure and romance. Lais were mainly composed in France and Germany, during the 13th and 14th centuries. The English term lay is a 13th-century loan from Old French lai. The origin of the French term itself is unclear; perhaps it is itself a loan from German Leich (reflected in archaic or dialectal English lake, "sport, play").The terms note, nota and notula (as used by Johannes de Grocheio) appear to have been synonyms for lai. The poetic form of the lai usually has several stanzas, none of which have the same form. As a result, the accompanying music consists of sections which do not repeat. This distinguishes the lai from other common types of musically important verse of the period (for example, the rondeau and the ballade)
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Hocket
In music, hocket is the rhythmic linear technique using the alternation of notes, pitches, or chords. In medieval practice of hocket, a single melody is shared between two (or occasionally more) voices such that alternately one voice sounds while the other rests.Contents1 History 2 Etymology 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] In European music, hocket was used primarily in vocal music of the 13th and early 14th centuries. It was a predominant characteristic of music of the Notre Dame school, during the ars antiqua, in which it was found in sacred vocal music. In the 14th century, the device was most often found in secular vocal music.In seculumExample of hocket (In seculum d'Amiens longum), French, late 13th century. Observe the quick alternation of sung notes and rests between the upper two voices
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Scribe
A scribe is a person who serves as a professional copyist, especially one who made copies of manuscripts before the invention of automatic printing.[1] The profession, previously widespread across cultures, lost most of its prominence and status with the advent of the printing press. The work of scribes can involve copying manuscripts and other texts as well as secretarial and administrative duties such as the taking of dictation and keeping of business, judicial, and historical records for kings, nobles, temples, and cities
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Manuscripts
A manuscript (abbreviated MS for singular and MSS for plural) is any document written by hand or typewritten, as opposed to being mechanically printed or reproduced in some indirect or automated way.[1] More recently, it is understood to be an author's written, typed, or word-processed copy of a work, as distinguished from the print of the same.[2] Before the arrival of printing, all documents and books were manuscripts. Manuscripts are not defined by their contents, which may combine writing with mathematical calculations, maps, explanatory figures or illustrations. Manuscripts may be in book form, scrolls or in codex format
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