HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

List Of Botanists By Author Abbreviation (A)
An abbreviation (from Latin
Latin
brevis, meaning short [1]) is a shortened form of a word or phrase. It consists of a group of letters taken from the word or phrase. For example, the word abbreviation can itself be represented by the abbreviation abbr., abbrv., or abbrev. In strict analysis, abbreviations should not be confused with contractions, crasis, acronyms, or initialisms, with which they share some semantic and phonetic functions, though all four are connected by the term "abbreviation" in loose parlance.[2]:p167An abbreviation is a shortening by any method; a contraction is a reduction of size by the drawing together of the parts. A contraction of a word is made by omitting certain letters or syllables and bringing together the first and last letters or elements; an abbreviation may be made by omitting certain portions from the interior or by cutting off a part. A contraction is an abbreviation, but an abbreviation is not necessarily a contraction
[...More...]

"List Of Botanists By Author Abbreviation (A)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Reverend
The Reverend
The Reverend
is an honorific style[1] most often placed before the names of Christian clergy and ministers. There are sometimes differences in the way the style is used in different countries and church traditions. The Reverend
The Reverend
is correctly called a style but is often and in some dictionaries called a title, form of address or title of respect.[2] The style is also sometimes used by leaders in non-Christian religions such as Judaism
Judaism
and Buddhism. The term is an anglicisation of the Latin reverendus, the style originally used in Latin documents in medieval Europe. It is the gerundive or future passive participle of the verb revereri ("to respect; to revere"), meaning "[one who is] to be revered/must be respected". The Reverend
The Reverend
is therefore equivalent to The Honourable or The Venerable
[...More...]

"Reverend" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Television
Television
Television
(TV) is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome (black and white), or in colour, and in two or three dimensions and sound. The term can refer to a television set, a television program ("TV show"), or the medium of television transmission. Television
Television
is a mass medium for advertising, entertainment and news. Television
Television
became available in crude experimental forms in the late 1920s, but it would still be several years before the new technology would be marketed to consumers. After World War II, an improved form of black-and-white TV broadcasting became popular in the United States and Britain, and television sets became commonplace in homes, businesses, and institutions
[...More...]

"Television" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Short Message Service
SMS
SMS
(Short Message Service) is a text messaging service component of most telephone, World Wide Web, and mobile device systems.[1] It uses standardized communication protocols to enable mobile devices to exchange short text messages. An intermediary service can facilitate a text-to-voice conversion to be sent to landlines.[2] SMS
SMS
was the most widely used data application, with an estimated 3.5 billion active users, or about 80% of all mobile subscribers, at the end of 2010.[1] SMS, as used on modern devices, originated from radio telegraphy in radio memo pagers that used standardized phone protocols. These were defined in 1985 as part of the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) series of standards.[3] The protocols allowed users to send and receive messages of up to 160 alpha-numeric characters to and from GSM mobiles
[...More...]

"Short Message Service" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

GSM 03.38
In mobile telephony GSM 03.38 or 3GPP 23.038 is a character set used in the Short Message Service of GSM based cell phones. It is defined in GSM recommendation 03.38
[...More...]

"GSM 03.38" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

SMS Language
SMS
SMS
language, textese or texting language[1] is the abbreviated language and slang commonly used with mobile phone text messaging, or other Internet-based communication such as email and instant messaging. Three features of early mobile phone messaging encouraged users to use abbreviations:Text entry was difficult, requiring multiple key presses on a small keypad to generate each letter; messages were limited to 160 characters; and it made texting faster.Once it became popular it took on a life of its own and was often used outside its original context.Contents1 History1.1
[...More...]

"SMS Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Social Networking Service
A social networking service (also social networking site, SNS or social media) is an online platform that people use to build social networks or social relations with other people who share similar personal or career interests, activities, backgrounds or real-life connections. The variety of stand-alone and built-in social networking services currently available online introduces challenges of definition; however, some common features exist:[1][2]social networking services are Internet-based applications[1][2][3] user-generated content (UGC) is the lifeblood of SNS organisations.[2][4] Online community services are sometimes considered[by whom?] social-network services, though in a broader sense, a social-network service usually provides an individual-centered service whereas online community services are group-centered
[...More...]

"Social Networking Service" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Style Guide
A style guide (or manual of style) is a set of standards for the writing and design of documents, either for general use or for a specific publication, organization, or field. (It is often called a style sheet, though that term has other meanings.) A style guide establishes and enforces style to improve communication. To do that, it ensures consistency within a document and across multiple documents and enforces best practice in usage and in language composition, visual composition, orthography and typography
[...More...]

"Style Guide" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hart's Rules
Hart's Rules
Hart's Rules
for Compositors and Readers at the University Press, Oxford – today published under the short title New Hart's Rules
Hart's Rules
– is an authoritative reference book and style guide published in England by Oxford University Press
Oxford University Press
(OUP). Hart's Rules
Hart's Rules
originated as a compilation of best practices and standards by Horace Hart over almost three decades during his employment at other printing establishments, but they were first printed as a single broadsheet page for in-house use by the OUP
OUP
in 1893 while Hart's job was controller of the university press
[...More...]

"Hart's Rules" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fowler's Modern English Usage
A Dictionary of Modern English Usage (1926), by Henry Watson Fowler (1858–1933), is a style guide to British English
British English
usage, pronunciation, and writing. Covering topics such as plurals and literary technique, distinctions among like words (homonyms and synonyms), and the use of foreign terms, the dictionary became the standard for other guides to writing in English. Hence, the 1926 first edition remains in print, along with the 1965 second edition, edited by Ernest Gowers, and reprinted in 1983 and 1987. The 1996 third edition, re-titled as The New Fowler’s Modern English Usage (revised in 2004) was mostly rewritten by Robert W. Burchfield, as a usage dictionary that incorporated corpus linguistics data;[1] and the 2015 fourth edition, re-titled Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage, edited by Jeremy Butterfield, takes the same approach as the third edition (and only revised some entries)
[...More...]

"Fowler's Modern English Usage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Doctor (title)
Doctor is an academic title that originates from the Latin word of the same spelling and meaning.[1] The word is originally an agentive noun of the Latin verb docēre [dɔˈkeːrɛ] 'to teach'. It has been used as an academic title in Europe since the 13th century, when the first doctorates were awarded at the University of Bologna
University of Bologna
and the University
University
of Paris. Having become established in European universities, this usage spread around the world. Contracted "Dr" or "Dr.", it is used as a designation for a person who has obtained a Doctorate
Doctorate
(e.g. PhD)
[...More...]

"Doctor (title)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Professor
Professor
Professor
(commonly abbreviated as Prof.)[1] is an academic rank at universities and other post-secondary education and research institutions in most countries
[...More...]

"Professor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

The Right Honourable
The Right Honourable (The Rt Hon. or Rt Hon.) is an honorific style traditionally applied to certain persons and to certain collective bodies in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, India, some other Commonwealth realms, the Anglophone Caribbean, Mauritius, and occasionally elsewhere
[...More...]

"The Right Honourable" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

English Channel
The English Channel
English Channel
(French: la Manche, "The Sleeve"; German: Ärmelkanal, "Sleeve Channel"; Breton: Mor Breizh, "Sea of Brittany"; Cornish: Mor Bretannek, "British Sea"), also called simply the Channel, is the body of water that separates southern England
England
from northern France, and links the southern part of the North Sea
North Sea
to the Atlantic Ocean
[...More...]

"English Channel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

American English
American English
American English
(AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US),[3] sometimes called United States
United States
English or U.S. English,[4][5] is the set of dialects of the English language
English language
native to the United States
United States
of America.[6] English is the most widely spoken language in the United States
United States
and is the common language used by the federal government, to the extent that all laws and compulsory education are practiced in English
[...More...]

"American English" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.