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List Of Biblical Places
This is an incomplete list of places, lands, and countries mentioned in the Bible. Some places may be listed twice, under two different names
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List Of Minor Biblical Places
Abdon was a Levitical city
Levitical city
in Asher allocated to the Gershonites.[1] Adam[edit] Adam was a location which, according to Joshua
Joshua
3:16, was along the Jordan River, near Zarethan. According to Cheyne and Black, it may be a scribal error for "Adamah".[2] Adadah[edit] Adadah is the name of a town mentioned in Joshua
Joshua
15:22, in a list of towns inside the territory of the Tribe of Judah
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Beer-sheba
Beersheba, also spelled Beer-Sheva (/bɪərˈʃiːbə/; Hebrew: בְּאֵר שֶׁבַע‬  Be'er Sheva [be.eʁˈʃeva]; Arabic: بئر السبع‎  Bi'ir as-Sab  [biːr esˈsabeʕ]), is the largest city in the Negev
Negev
desert of southern Israel. Often referred to as the "Capital of the Negev", it is the center of the fourth most populous metropolitan area in Israel, the eighth most populous Israeli city with a population of 205,810,[1] and the second largest city with a total area of 117,500 dunams (after Jerusalem). With an ancient history, and long used as a bedouin encampment, the modern history of Beersheva began at the start of the 20th century when a permanent settlement was established by the Ottoman Turks.[2] The Battle of Beersheba
Beersheba
was part of a wider British offensive in World War I aimed at breaking the Turkish defensive line from Gaza to Beersheba
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Kirkuk
Kirkuk
Kirkuk
(Arabic: كركوك‎ Karkūk; Kurdish: کەرکووک‎ Kerkûk; Turkish: Kerkük) is an Iraqi city and the capital of the Kirkuk Governorate
Kirkuk Governorate
of Iraq, 238 kilometres (148 miles) north of Baghdad.[2] Kirkuk
Kirkuk
lies in a wide zone with an enormously diverse population and has been multilingual for centuries
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Ashdod
Ashdod
Ashdod
(Hebrew:  אַשְׁדּוֹד‬; Arabic: أَشْدُود‎ Ashdud or إِسْدُود Isdud) is the sixth-largest city and the largest port in Israel
Israel
accounting for 60% of the country's imported goods. Ashdod
Ashdod
is located in the Southern District of the country, on the Mediterranean coast where it is situated between Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
to the North (32 kilometres (20 miles) away) and Ashkelon
Ashkelon
to the South (20 km (12 mi) away). Jerusalem
Jerusalem
is 53 km (33 mi) to the east. The city is also an important regional industrial center. Modern Ashdod
Ashdod
covers the territory of two ancient twin towns, one inland and one on the coast, which were for most of their history two separate entities, connected by close ties with each other
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Ashkelon
Ashkelon
Ashkelon
(/ˈæʃkəlɒn/; also spelled Ashqelon and Ascalon[2] /ˈæskəlɒn/; Hebrew:  אַשְׁקְלוֹן‬ [aʃkelon]; Arabic: عَسْقَلَان‎ ʿAsqalān) is a coastal city in the Southern District of Israel
Israel
on the Mediterranean coast, 50 kilometres (31 mi) south of Tel Aviv, and 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) north of the border with the Gaza Strip. The ancient seaport of Ashkelon dates back to the Neolithic
Neolithic
Age
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Ashur
Ashur (אַשּׁוּר) was the second son of Shem, the son of Noah. Ashur's brothers were Elam, Arphaxad, Lud, and Aram. Prior to the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, there was contention in academic circles regarding whether Ashur or Nimrod built the Assyrian cities of Nineveh, Resen, Rehoboth-Ir and Calah, since the name Ashur can refer to both the person and the country (compare Genesis 10:8–12 AV and Genesis 10:8–12 ESV).[1] Sir Walter Raleigh devoted several pages in his History of the World (c
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Asshur
Ashur (אַשּׁוּר) was the second son of Shem, the son of Noah. Ashur's brothers were Elam, Arphaxad, Lud, and Aram. Prior to the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, there was contention in academic circles regarding whether Ashur or Nimrod built the Assyrian cities of Nineveh, Resen, Rehoboth-Ir and Calah, since the name Ashur can refer to both the person and the country (compare Genesis 10:8–12 AV and Genesis 10:8–12 ESV).[1] Sir Walter Raleigh devoted several pages in his History of the World (c
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Assur
Aššur (Akkadian; Syriac: ܐܫܘܪ‎ 'Āšūr; Persian: آشور‎: Āšūr; Hebrew: אַשּׁוּר‬: Aššûr, Arabic: اشور‎: Āšūr, Kurdish: Asûr), also known as Ashur and Qal'at Sherqat, was an Assyrian city, capital of the Old Assyrian Empire
Old Assyrian Empire
(2025–1750 BC), of the Middle Assyrian Empire
Middle Assyrian Empire
(1365–1050 BC), and for a time, of the Neo-Assyrian Empire
Neo-Assyrian Empire
of 911–608 BC. The remains of the city lie on the western bank of the Tigris River, north of the confluence with the tributary Little Zab
Little Zab
River, in modern-day Iraq, more precisely in the Al-Shirqat District
Al-Shirqat District
of the Saladin Governorate. Occupation of the city itself continued for approximately 4000 years, from the mid-3rd millennium BC (c
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Baal-hazor
Baal-hazor, Baal's village, is the place on the border of Ephraim and Benjamin where Absalom
Absalom
held the feast of sheep-shearing when Amnon
Amnon
was assassinated according to 2 Samuel
2 Samuel
13:23. It is probably identical with Hazor mentioned in Nehemiah
Nehemiah
11:33, now Tell Asur, 8 km north-east of Bethel. It is also a 1,016 meters high mountain and the highest mountain in the West Bank. See also[edit]Hazor (other) This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Easton, Matthew George (1897). "Baal-Hazor". Easton's Bible Dictionary
Easton's Bible Dictionary
(New and revised ed.). T. Nelson and Sons. This article related to the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
is a stub
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Tower Of Babel
The Tower
Tower
of Babel (Hebrew: מִגְדַּל בָּבֶל‬‎, Migdal Bāḇēl) as told in Genesis 11:1-9 is an origin myth meant to explain why the world's peoples speak different languages.[1][2][3][4] According to the story, a united humanity in the generations following the Great Flood, speaking a single language and migrating eastward, comes to the land of Shinar
Shinar
(שִׁנְעָר‬). There they agree to build a city and a tower tall enough to reach heaven
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Babylon
Babylon
Babylon
(𒆍𒀭𒊏𒆠KAN4.DIĜIR.RAKI Akkadian: Bābili(m); Aramaic: בבל, Babel; Arabic: بَابِل‎, Bābil; Hebrew: בָּבֶל‎, Bavel; Classical Syriac: ܒܒܠ‎, Bāwēl) was a key kingdom in ancient Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
from the 18th to 6th centuries BC. The city was built on the Euphrates
Euphrates
river and divided in equal parts along its left and right banks, with steep embankments to contain the river's seasonal floods
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Babylonia
Babylonia
Babylonia
(/ˌbæbəˈloʊniə, -ˈloʊnjə/) was an ancient Akkadian-speaking state and cultural area based in central-southern Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
(present-day Iraq). A small Amorite-ruled state emerged in 1894 BC, which contained the minor administrative town of Babylon.[1] It was merely a small provincial town during the Akkadian
Akkadian
Empire (2335–2154 BC) but greatly expanded during the reign of Hammurabi
Hammurabi
in the first half of the 18th century BC and became a major capital city. During the reign of Hammurabi
Hammurabi
and afterwards, Babylonia
Babylonia
was called "the country of Akkad" (Māt Akkadī in Akkadian).[2][3] It was often involved in rivalry with the older state of Assyria
Assyria
to the north and Elam
Elam
to the east in Ancient Iran
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Beit El
Beit El
Beit El
(Hebrew: בֵּית אֵל‬) is an Israeli settlement
Israeli settlement
and local council located in the Binyamin Region of the West Bank. The Orthodox Jewish town is located in the hills north of Jerusalem, east of the Palestinian city of al-Bireh, adjacent to Ramallah. In September 1997, Beit El
Beit El
was awarded local council status. The head of the local council is Shai Alon. In 2016 its population was 6,115. Its current population is 6,500 residents.[2] The international community considers Israeli settlements in the West Bank illegal under international law, but the Israeli government disputes this.[3] The Ulpana neighbourhood was evacuated when it emerged that it was built on private Palestinian land
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Caucasus
 Abkhazia Artsakh South OssetiaAutonomous republics and federal regions Russia Adygea  Chechnya  Dagestan  Ingushetia  Kabardino-Balkaria Karachay-Cherkessia  Krasnodar Krai North Ossetia-Alania  Stavropol Krai Georgia Adjara Abkhazia (since 2008, in exile) Azerbaijan NakhchivanDemonym CaucasianTime Zones UTC+02:00, UTC+03:00, UTC+03:30, UTC+4:00, UTC+04:30The Caucasus
Caucasus
/ˈkɔːkəsəs/ or Caucasia /kɔːˈkeɪʒə/ is a region located at the border of
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Beirut
Coordinates: 33°53′13″N 35°30′47″E / 33.88694°N 35.51306°E / 33.88694; 35.51306Beirut بيروت BeyrouthCity Beirut
Beirut
city skyline in the early 2000sFlagSealNickname(s): Paris of the East[1]Motto(s): Beirut, mother of laws (Latin: Berytus
Berytus
Nutrix Legum)BeirutLocation of Beirut
Beirut
within LebanonCoordinates: 33°53′13″N 35°30′47″E / 33.88694°N 35.51306°E / 33.88694; 35.51306Country  LebanonGovernorate BeirutGovernment • Mayor Jamal ItaniArea • City 19.8 km2 (7.6 sq mi) • Metro 67 km2 (26 sq mi)Population (2014) • City c. 361,366 [2] • Metro c
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