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Linguasphere Observatory
The Linguasphere Observatory (or "Observatoire", based upon its original French and legal title: Observatoire Linguistique) is a transnational linguistic research network.Contents1 History 2 The Lingua sphere Register and Linguascale referential framework2.1 Examples 2.2 Languages of London 2.3 See also3 "Langues de la Liberté/Languages of Liberty" 4 "In the galaxy of languages, each person's voice is a star" 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] It was created in Quebec
Quebec
in 1983 and was subsequently established and registered in Normandy
Normandy
as a non-profit association under the honorary presidency of the late Léopold Sédar Senghor, a French-language poet and the first president of Senegal
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Quebec
Quebec
Quebec
(/k(w)ɪˈbɛk/ ( listen);[8] French: Québec [kebɛk] ( listen))[9] is one of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada. It is bordered to the west by the province of Ontario
Ontario
and the bodies of water James Bay
James Bay
and Hudson Bay; to the north by Hudson Strait
Hudson Strait
and Ungava Bay; to the east by the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador; and to the south by the province of New Brunswick
New Brunswick
and the U.S. states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York. It also shares maritime borders with Nunavut, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia. Quebec
Quebec
is Canada's largest province by area and its second-largest administrative division; only the territory of Nunavut
Nunavut
is larger
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Runnymede
Runnymede
Runnymede
is a water-meadow alongside the River Thames
River Thames
in the English county of Surrey, and just over 20 miles (32 km) west of central London. It is notable for its association with the sealing of Magna Carta, and as a consequence is, with its adjoining hillside, the site of memorials. Runnymede
Runnymede
Borough is named after the area, Runnymede being at its northernmost point.Contents1 Topography 2 History2.1 Runnymede
Runnymede
Eco Village3 Features3.1 Urban H. Broughton Memorials 3.2 Langham Pond
Langham Pond
SSSI 3.3 Air Forces Memorial 3.4 John F. Kennedy
John F

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Upper Normandy
Upper Normandy
Normandy
(French: Haute-Normandie, IPA: [ot nɔʁmɑ̃di]; Norman: Ĥâote-Normaundie) is a former administrative region of France. On 1 January 2016, Upper and Lower Normandy
Normandy
merged becoming one region called Normandy.[1]Contents1 History 2 Major communities 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] It was created in 1956 from two departments: Seine-Maritime
Seine-Maritime
and Eure, when Normandy
Normandy
was divided into Lower Normandy
Normandy
and Upper Normandy. This division continued to provoke controversy, and many people continued to call for the two regions to be reunited. The two regions were finally merged on 1 January 2016
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Centre Georges Pompidou
Centre Georges Pompidou
Georges Pompidou
(French pronunciation: ​[sɑ̃tʁ ʒɔʁʒ pɔ̃pidu]), commonly shortened to Centre Pompidou and also known as the Pompidou Centre in English, is a complex building in the Beaubourg
Beaubourg
area of the 4th arrondissement of Paris, near Les Halles, rue Montorgueil, and the Marais. It was designed in the style of high-tech architecture by the architectural team of Richard Rogers
Richard Rogers
and Renzo Piano, along with Gianfranco Franchini. It houses the Bibliothèque publique d'information (Public Information Library), a vast public library; the Musée National d'Art Moderne, which is the largest museum for modern art in Europe; and IRCAM, a centre for music and acoustic research
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Magna Carta
Magna Carta
Magna Carta
Libertatum ( Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
for "the Great Charter
Charter
of the Liberties"), commonly called Magna Carta
Magna Carta
(also Magna Charta; "Great Charter"),[a] is a charter agreed to by King John of England at Runnymede, near Windsor, on 15 June 1215.[b] First drafted by the Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
to make peace between the unpopular King and a group of rebel barons, it promised the protection of church rights, protection for the barons from illegal imprisonment, access to swift justice, and limitations on feudal payments to the Crown, to be implemented through a council of 25 barons. Neither side stood behind their commitments, and the charter was annulled by Pope Innocent III, leading to the First Barons' War
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Liège
Liège
Liège
(French: [ljɛʒ] ( listen) locally [li.eʃ]; Walloon: Lidje [liːtʃ]; Dutch: Luik, [lœyk] ( listen); German: Lüttich), is a major Walloon city and municipality and the capital of the Belgian province of Liège. The city is situated in the valley of the Meuse River, in the east of Belgium, not far from borders with the Netherlands
Netherlands
( Maastricht
Maastricht
is about 33 km (20.5 mi) to the north) and with Germany
Germany
(Aachen is about 53 km (32.9 mi) north-east). At Liège
Liège
the Meuse river meets the river Ourthe. The city is part of the sillon industriel, the former industrial backbone of Wallonia. It still is the principal economic and cultural centre of the region. The Liège
Liège
municipality (i.e
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Commonwealth Institute
The Commonwealth Institute
Commonwealth Institute
was established, as the Imperial Institute, by royal charter from Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
in 1888.[1] Its name was changed to the Commonwealth Institute
Commonwealth Institute
in 1958.[2] By statute, the operations were the responsibility of a Minister of State from 1902[3] to 2003[4] and the property occupied for the purposes of the Institute, and of the same name, was held separately by Trustees as a charity asset
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Old Parliament House, Canberra
Old Parliament House, known formerly as the Provisional Parliament House, was the seat of the Parliament of Australia
Parliament of Australia
from 1927 to 1988. The building began operation on 9 May 1927 after Parliament's relocation from Melbourne
Melbourne
to the new capital, Canberra. In 1988, the Commonwealth Parliament transferred to the new Parliament House on Capital Hill
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Fleury-sur-Andelle
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Fleury-sur-Andelle is a commune in the Eure department in the Normandy region in northern France.Contents1 Population 2 International relations 3 See also 4 ReferencesPopulation[edit]Historical populationYear Pop. ±%1821 238 —    1851 1,587 +566.8%1962 1,528 −3.7%1968 1,604 +5.0%1975 1,817 +13.3%1982 2,039 +12.2%1990 2,015 −1.2%1999 1,923 −4.6%2008 1,879 −2.3%International relations[edit] It is twinned with East Goscote, Leicestershire. See also[edit]Communes of the Eure departmentReferences[edit]INSEEWikimedia Commons has media related to Fleury-sur-Ande
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Normandy
Normandy
Normandy
(/ˈnɔːrməndi/; French: Normandie, pronounced [nɔʁmɑ̃di] ( listen), Norman: Normaundie, from Old French
Old French
Normanz, plural of Normant, originally from the word for "northman" in several Scandinavian languages)[2] is one of the 18 regions of France, roughly corresponding to the historical Duchy of Normandy. Administratively, Normandy
Normandy
is divided into five départements: Calvados, Eure, Manche, Orne, and Seine-Maritime. It covers 30,627 square kilometres (11,825 sq mi),[3] comprising roughly 5% of the territory of metropolitan France
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Maillane
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Maillane (name in French; Malhana in Occitan language) is a commune in the Bouches-du-Rhône department in southern France in the former province of Provence.Contents1 Geography 2 Population 3 People 4 See also 5 ReferencesGeography[edit] Maillane is located 7 km (4.3 mi) north-west of Saint-Rémy-de-Provence and 15 km (9.3 mi) north-east of Tarascon. Population[edit]Historical populationYear Pop. ±%1793 1,200 —    1800 1,324 +10.3%1806 1,273 −3.9%1821 1,386 +8.9%1831 1,505 +8.6%1836 1,356 −9.9%1841 1,430 +5.5%1846 1,507 +5.4%1851 1,556 +3.3%1856 1,522 −2.2%
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Huy
Huy
Huy
(pronounced [ɥi]; Dutch: Hoei; Walloon: Hu) is a municipality of Belgium. It lies in the country's Walloon Region and Province of Liege. Huy
Huy
lies along the river Meuse, at the mouth of the small river Hoyoux. It is in the sillon industriel, the former industrial backbone of Wallonia, home to about two-thirds of the Walloon population. The Huy
Huy
municipality includes the sub-municipalities of Ben-Ahin, Neuville-sous-Huy, and Tihange.Contents1 History1.1 Folklore2 Main sights 3 Cycling 4 In popular culture 5 Famous persons 6 International relations6.1 Twin towns – Sister cities7 Gallery 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The first village originated around the Roman castrum, an early fortress located on the right bank of the River Meuse
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André Martinet
André Martinet (French: [ɑ̃.dʁe maʁ.ti.nɛ]; Saint-Alban-des-Villards, 12 April 1908 – Châtenay-Malabry, 16 July 1999) was a French linguist, influential by his work on structural linguistics.Contents1 Life and work 2 Personal life 3 Publications 4 See also 5 ReferencesLife and work[edit] Martinet passed his agrégation in English and received his doctorate after submitting, as is traditional in France, two theses: La gémination consonantique d'origine expressive dans les langues germaniques and La phonologie du mot en danois. From 1938 to 1946, he was a director of studies of the École pratique des hautes études. Following World War II, he moved to New York City, where he was to remain until 1955. In New York, he directed the International Auxiliary Language Association and taught at Columbia University, where he served as chair of the department from 1947 to 1955. Also, he became editor of Word, a linguistics journal
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UNESCO
The United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO;[2] French: Organisation des Nations unies pour l'éducation, la science et la culture) is a specialized agency of the United Nations (UN) based in Paris
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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