HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Linear B
Linear B
Linear B
is a syllabic script that was used for writing Mycenaean Greek, the earliest attested form of Greek. The script predates the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet
by several centuries. The oldest Mycenaean writing dates to about 1450 BC.[1] It is descended from the older Linear A, an undeciphered earlier script used for writing the Minoan language, as is the later Cypriot syllabary, which also recorded Greek. Linear B, found mainly in the palace archives at Knossos, Cydonia,[2] Pylos, Thebes and Mycenae,[3] disappeared with the fall of Mycenaean civilization during the Late Bronze Age
Late Bronze Age
collapse. The succeeding period, known as the Greek Dark Ages, provides no evidence of the use of writing
[...More...]

"Linear B" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Linear B Syllabary
Linear B
Linear B
Syllabary is a Unicode block containing characters for the syllabic writing of Mycenaean Greek.Contents1 Block 2 History 3 See also 4 ReferencesBlock[edit] Linear B
[...More...]

"Linear B Syllabary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

John Chadwick
John Chadwick, FBA (/ˈtʃædwɪk/; 21 May 1920 – 24 November 1998) was an English linguist and classical scholar who, with Michael Ventris, was most notable for the decipherment of Linear B.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Family 3 Publications 4 Decorations and awards 5 See also 6 ReferencesEarly life and education[edit] Chadwick was born in East Sheen, Richmond-upon-Thames, and educated at St Paul's School and Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. He served as an officer in the Royal Navy's Special
Special
Branch during the Second World War.[1] In May 1942, he was transferred to intelligence duties at the naval base HMS Nile in Alexandria, Egypt, and worked on breaking lower-level Italian naval codes.[2] Chadwick was working on Italian naval codes as an Able Seaman when, in September 1942, he was suddenly (and immediately) promoted to Temporary Sub-Lieutenant as the material was classed as “Officers Only”
[...More...]

"John Chadwick" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Peloponnese
The Peloponnese
Peloponnese
(/ˈpɛləpəˌniːz/) or Peloponnesus (/ˌpɛləpəˈniːsəs/; Greek: Πελοπόννησος, Pelopónnēsos) is a peninsula and geographic region in southern Greece. It is separated from the central part of the country by the Isthmus and Gulf of Corinth
[...More...]

"Peloponnese" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greece
Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ελλάδα), officially the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), historically also known as Hellas, is a country located in Southern Europe,[10] with a population of approximately 11 million as of 2016. Athens
Athens
is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Greece
Greece
is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, it shares land borders with Albania
Albania
to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the north, and Turkey
Turkey
to the northeast
[...More...]

"Greece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crete
Crete
Crete
(Greek: Κρήτη, Kríti ['kriti]; Ancient Greek: Κρήτη, Krḗtē) is the largest and most populous of the Greek islands, the 88th largest island in the world and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, after Sicily, Sardinia, Cyprus, and Corsica. Crete and a number of surrounding islands and islets constitute the region of Crete
Crete
(Greek: Περιφέρεια Κρήτης), one of the 13 top-level administrative units of Greece. The capital and the largest city is Heraklion. As of 2011[update], the region had a population of 623,065. Crete
Crete
forms a significant part of the economy and cultural heritage of Greece, while retaining its own local cultural traits (such as its own poetry and music). It was once the centre of the Minoan civilisation (c. 2700–1420 BC), which is the earliest known civilisation in Europe
[...More...]

"Crete" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Phonetic
Phonetics (pronounced /fəˈnɛtɪks/) is a branch of linguistics that studies the sounds of human speech, or—in the case of sign languages—the equivalent aspects of sign.[1] It is concerned with the physical properties of speech sounds or signs (phones): their physiological production, acoustic properties, auditory perception, and neurophysiological status
[...More...]

"Phonetic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Semantic
Semantics (from Ancient Greek: σημαντικός sēmantikos, "significant")[1][2] is the linguistic and philosophical study of meaning, in language, programming languages, formal logics, and semiotics. It is concerned with the relationship between signifiers—like words, phrases, signs, and symbols—and what they stand for, their denotation. In international scientific vocabulary semantics is also called semasiology. The word semantics was first used by Michel Bréal, a French philologist.[3] It denotes a range of ideas—from the popular to the highly technical. It is often used in ordinary language for denoting a problem of understanding that comes down to word selection or connotation. This problem of understanding has been the subject of many formal enquiries, over a long period of time, especially in the field of formal semantics
[...More...]

"Semantic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Racine, Wisconsin
Racine (/rəˈsiːn/ rə-SEEN)[8] is a city in and the county seat of Racine County, Wisconsin, United States. It is located on the shore of Lake Michigan
Lake Michigan
at the mouth of the Root River.[9] Racine is located 22 miles south of Milwaukee. As of the 2013 U.S. census, the city had a population of 78,199,[10] making it the fifth-largest city in Wisconsin. Its median home price of $103,625[11] makes it one of the most affordable cities in Wisconsin
Wisconsin
to buy a home. In January 2017, it was rated "the most affordable place to live in the world" by the Demographia International Housing Affordability survey.[12] Racine is the headquarters of a number of industries, including J. I. Case (heavy equipment), S. C. Johnson & Son (cleaning and chemical products), Dremel
Dremel
Corporation, Reliance Controls Corporation (time controls and transfer switches), Twin Disc, and Arthur B
[...More...]

"Racine, Wisconsin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Emmett L. Bennett, Jr.
Emmett Leslie Bennett Jr. (July 12, 1918 – December 15, 2011) was an American classicist and philologist whose systematic catalog of its symbols led to the solution of the mystery of reading and interpreting Linear B, a syllabary used for writing Mycenaean Greek, a 3,300-year-old script that was used hundreds of years before the Greek alphabet was developed. Archaeologist Arthur Evans had discovered Linear B in 1900 during his excavations at Knossos on the Greek island of Crete and spent decades trying to comprehend its writings until his death in 1941
[...More...]

"Emmett L. Bennett, Jr." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Comité International Permanent Des Études Mycéniennes
The Permanent International Committee for Mycenaean Studies, always known as the Comité International Permanent des Études Mycéniennes or CIPEM, even in English, acts as a standardising body for Mycenaean studies and related disciplines, including Linear A and Cypriot epigraphy. It is an affiliate of UNESCO. It also oversees the organisation of International Colloquia on Mycenaean Studies, which as of 2011 number thirteen. The thirteenth was held in Paris in 2010, and the fourteenth will be held in Copenhagen. External links[edit]CIPEM's websiteAuthority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 167514284 GND: 1022526-2 SUDOC: 026480263 BNF: cb11872102k (data)This European history–related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Comité International Permanent Des Études Mycéniennes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

UNESCO
The United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO;[2] French: Organisation des Nations unies pour l'éducation, la science et la culture) is a specialized agency of the United Nations (UN) based in Paris
[...More...]

"UNESCO" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Phonetic Value
Phonetic transcription (also known as phonetic script or phonetic notation) is the visual representation of speech sounds (or phones). The most common type of phonetic transcription uses a phonetic alphabet, such as the International Phonetic Alphabet.Contents1 Versus orthography 2 Narrow versus broad transcription 3 Types of notational systems3.1 Alphabetic3.1.1 Aspects of alphabetic transcription3.2 Iconic 3.3 Analphabetic4 Bibliography 5 See also5.1 Notational systems6 References 7 External linksVersus orthography[edit] The pronunciation of words in many languages, as distinct from their written form (orthography), has undergone significant change over time. Pronunciation can also vary greatly among dialects of a language. Standard orthography in some languages, particularly French, English, and Irish, is often irregular, and makes it difficult to predict pronunciation from spelling
[...More...]

"Phonetic Value" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

CIPEM
The Permanent International Committee for Mycenaean Studies, always known as the Comité International Permanent des Études Mycéniennes or CIPEM, even in English, acts as a standardising body for Mycenaean studies and related disciplines, including Linear A and Cypriot epigraphy. It is an affiliate of UNESCO. It also oversees the organisation of International Colloquia on Mycenaean Studies, which as of 2011 number thirteen. The thirteenth was held in Paris in 2010, and the fourteenth will be held in Copenhagen. External links[edit]CIPEM's websiteAuthority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 167514284 GND: 1022526-2 SUDOC: 026480263 BNF: cb11872102k (data)This European history–related article is a stub
[...More...]

"CIPEM" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Dark Ages
The Greek Dark Age, also called Greek Dark Ages, Homeric Age (named for the fabled poet, Homer) or Geometric period (so called after the characteristic Geometric art
Geometric art
of the time),[1] is the period of Greek history from the end of the Mycenaean palatial civilization around 1100 BC to the first signs of the Greek poleis, city states, in the 9th century BC. The archaeological evidence shows a widespread collapse of Bronze Age civilization in the Eastern Mediterranean world at the outset of the period, as the great palaces and cities of the Mycenaeans were destroyed or abandoned. Around then, the Hittite civilization suffered serious disruption and cities from Troy
Troy
to Gaza were destroyed. Following the collapse, fewer and smaller settlements suggest famine and depopulation. In Greece, the Linear B
Linear B
writing of the Greek language used by Mycenaean bureaucrats ceased
[...More...]

"Greek Dark Ages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Syllable
A syllable is a unit of organization for a sequence of speech sounds. For example, the word water is composed of two syllables: wa and ter. A syllable is typically made up of a syllable nucleus (most often a vowel) with optional initial and final margins (typically, consonants). Syllables are often considered the phonological "building blocks" of words. They can influence the rhythm of a language, its prosody, its poetic meter and its stress patterns. Syllabic writing
Syllabic writing
began several hundred years before the first letters. The earliest recorded syllables are on tablets written around 2800 BC in the Sumerian city of Ur. This shift from pictograms to syllables has been called "the most important advance in the history of writing".[1] A word that consists of a single syllable (like English dog) is called a monosyllable (and is said to be monosyllabic)
[...More...]

"Syllable" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.