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Life Hacking
Life hack (or life hacking) refers to any trick, shortcut, skill, or novelty method that increases productivity and efficiency, in all walks of life
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Productivity
Productivity
Productivity
describes various measures of the efficiency of production. A productivity measure is expressed as the ratio of output to inputs used in a production process, i.e. output per unit of input. Productivity
Productivity
is a crucial factor in production performance of firms and nations
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Efficiency
Efficiency is the (often measurable) ability to avoid wasting materials, energy, efforts, money, and time in doing something or in producing a desired result. In a more general sense, it is the ability to do things well, successfully, and without waste.[1][2][3][4][5] In more mathematical or scientific terms, it is a measure of the extent to which input is well used for an intended task or function (output). It often specifically comprises the capability of a specific application of effort to produce a specific outcome with a minimum amount or quantity of waste, expense, or unnecessary effort. Efficiency refers to very different inputs and outputs in different fields and industries. Efficiency is very often confused with effectiveness. In general, efficiency is a measurable concept, quantitatively determined by the ratio of useful output to total input
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Spaced Repetition
Spaced repetition
Spaced repetition
is a learning technique that incorporates increasing intervals of time between subsequent review of previously learned material in order to exploit the psychological spacing effect. Alternative names include spaced rehearsal, expanding rehearsal, graduated intervals, repetition spacing, repetition scheduling, spaced retrieval and expanded retrieval.[1] Although the principle is useful in many contexts, spaced repetition is commonly applied in contexts in which a learner must acquire a large number of items and retain them indefinitely in memory
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Incremental Reading
Incremental reading
Incremental reading
is a software-assisted method for learning and retaining information from reading, helping with the creation of flashcards out of electronic articles read in portions inside a prioritized reading list. It is particularly targeted to people who are trying to learn for life a large amount of information, particularly if that information comes from various sources. "Incremental reading" means "reading in portions"
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Hipster PDA
The Hipster PDA
Hipster PDA
is a paper-based personal organizer, popularized by Merlin Mann.[1] Originally a tongue-in-cheek reaction to the increasing expense and complexity of personal digital assistants, the Hipster PDA
Hipster PDA
(said to stand for "Parietal Disgorgement Aid" and often abbreviated to "hPDA") simply comprises a sheaf of index cards held together with a binder clip
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43 Folders
A tickler file or 43 Folders System is a collection of date-labeled file folders organized in a way that allows time-sensitive documents to be filed according to the future date on which each document needs action. Documents within the folders of a tickler file can be to-do lists, pending bills, unpaid invoices, travel tickets, hotel reservations, meeting information, birthday reminders, coupons, claim tickets, call-back notes, follow-up reminders, maintenance reminders, or any other papers that require future action. Each day, the folder having the current date is retrieved from the tickler file so that any documents within it may be acted on
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Rube Goldberg
Reuben Garrett Lucius Goldberg (July 4, 1883 – December 7, 1970), known best as Rube Goldberg, was an American cartoonist, sculptor, author, engineer, and inventor. Goldberg is best known for a series of popular cartoons depicting complicated gadgets that perform simple tasks in indirect, convoluted ways, giving rise to the term Rube Goldberg
Rube Goldberg
machines for any similar gadget or process. Goldberg received many honors in his lifetime, including a Pulitzer Prize for his political cartooning in 1948 and the Banshees' Silver Lady Award in 1959.[1] Goldberg was a founding member and the first president of the National Cartoonists Society,[2] and he is the namesake of the Reuben Award, which the organization awards to the Cartoonist
Cartoonist
of the Year
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MacGyverisms
MacGyver is an American television series that ran from the late 1980s to the early 1990s.Contents1 MacGyverisms and "to MacGyver" 2 Uses of the theme song 3 Other cultural references3.1 MacGruber 3.2 MythBusters4 ReferencesMacGyverisms and "to MacGyver"[edit] MacGyver employs his resourcefulness and his knowledge of chemistry, physics,[1] technology, and outdoorsmanship to resolve what are often life-or-death crises. He creates inventions from simple items to solve these problems
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Tim Ferriss
Timothy Ferriss (born July 20, 1977) is an American author, entrepreneur, and public speaker.[1][2] He has written a number of self-help books on the "4-hour" theme, some of which have appeared on the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today
USA Today
bestseller lists, starting with The 4-Hour Workweek.[11] Ferriss is also an angel investor and an advisor to Facebook, Twitter, StumbleUpon, Evernote, and Uber, among other companies.[12][13]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Investor and advisor 4 Author4.1 The 4-Hour Workweek 4.2 The 4-Hour Body 4.3 The 4-Hour Chef 4.4 Tools of Titans 4.5 Tribe of Mentors5 The Tim Ferriss
Tim Ferriss
Show 6 Fear(Less) with Tim Ferriss 7 Influence 8 Philanthropy8.1 Psychedelic research9 Personal life 10 References 11 External linksEarly life[edit] Ferriss grew up in East Hampton, New York and graduated from St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire
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Kludge
A kludge or kluge (/klʌdʒ, kluːdʒ/) is a workaround or quick-and-dirty solution that is clumsy, inelegant, inefficient, difficult to extend and hard to maintain. This term is used in diverse fields such as computer science, aerospace engineering, Internet slang, evolutionary neuroscience, and government.Contents1 Pronunciation and etymology1.1 Jackson W. Granholm 1.2 Yiddish 1.3 European surname 1.4 Military jargon 1.5 Paper feeder 1.6 Acronym2 Industries2.1 Aerospace
Aerospace
engineering 2.2 Computer science 2.3 Evolutionary neuroscience3 Other uses 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPronunciation and etymology[edit] The word has alternate spellings (kludge and kluge), pronunciations (/klʌdʒ/ and /kluːdʒ/, rhyming with judge and stooge respectively) and several proposed etymologies. Jackson W
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Getting Things Done
Getting Things Done
Getting Things Done
is a time management method, described in a book of the same title[1] by productivity consultant David Allen. The method is often referred to as GTD. The GTD method rests on the idea of moving planned tasks and projects out of the mind by recording them externally and then breaking them into actionable work items
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Podcast
A podcast, or generically netcast, is an episodic series of digital audio or video files which a user can download and listen to. It is often available for subscription, so that new episodes are automatically downloaded via web syndication to the user's own local computer, mobile application, or portable media player.[1] It is distinct from Internet
Internet
radio, which involves streaming rather than downloading. The word was originally suggested by Ben Hammersley
Ben Hammersley
as a portmanteau of "iPod" (a brand of media player) and "broadcast".[2] The files distributed are in audio format, but may sometimes include other file formats such as PDF or EPUB. Videos which are shared following a podcast model are called video podcasts or vodcasts. The generator of a podcast maintains a central list of the files on a server as a web feed that can be accessed through the Internet
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American Dialect Society
The American Dialect
Dialect
Society (ADS), founded in 1889, is a learned society "dedicated to the study of the English language
English language
in North America, and of other languages, or dialects of other languages, influencing it or influenced by it."[1] The Society publishes the academic journal, American Speech. Since its foundation, dialectologists in English-speaking North America have affiliated themselves with the American Dialect
Dialect
Society, an association which in its first constitution defined its objective as "the investigation of the spoken English of the United States
United States
and Canada" (Constitution, 1890)
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Make (magazine)
Make: (or MAKE:) is an American bimonthly magazine published by Maker Media[1] which focuses on do it yourself (DIY) and/or DIWO (Do It With Others)[2] projects involving computers, electronics, robotics, metalworking, woodworking and other disciplines. The magazine is marketed to people who enjoy making things and features complex projects which can often be completed with cheap materials, including household items. Make magazine is considered "a central organ of the maker movement."[3]Contents1 History and profile 2 Maker Faire 3 Makers 4 Craft 5 Make: television 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory and profile[edit] Its first issue was released in January 2005; as of July 2016, 52 issues were published. It is also available as an iPad version and a Texterity digital edition on the Web, which is free of charge to existing magazine subscribers
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