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Liberty (1924–1950)
Liberty was a weekly, general-interest magazine, originally priced at five cents and subtitled, "A Weekly for Everybody." It was launched in 1924 by McCormick-Patterson, the publisher until 1931, when it was taken over by Bernarr Macfadden
Bernarr Macfadden
until 1941. At one time it was said to be "the second greatest magazine in America," ranking behind The Saturday Evening Post in circulation.[citation needed] It featured contributions from some of the biggest politicians, celebrities, authors, and artists of the 20th-century. The contents of the magazine provide a unique look into popular culture, politics, and world events through the Roaring 20s, Great Depression, World War II, and Post-War America
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Mahatma Gandhi
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (/ˈɡɑːndi, ˈɡæn-/;[3] Hindustani: [ˈmoːɦənd̪aːs ˈkərəmtʃənd̪ ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] ( listen); 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India
India
to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā (Sanskrit: "high-souled", "venerable")[4]—applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa[5]—is now used worldwide
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Harry Houdini
Harry Houdini
Houdini
(born Erik Weisz, later Ehrich Weiss or Harry Weiss; March 24, 1874 – October 31, 1926) was an Austro-Hungarian-born American illusionist and stunt performer, noted for his sensational escape acts. He first attracted notice in vaudeville in the US and then as "Harry Handcuff
Handcuff
Houdini" on a tour of Europe, where he challenged police forces to keep him locked up. Soon he extended his repertoire to include chains, ropes slung from skyscrapers, straitjackets under water, and having to escape from and hold his breath inside a sealed milk can with water in it. In 1904, thousands watched as he tried to escape from special handcuffs commissioned by London's Daily Mirror, keeping them in suspense for an hour. Another stunt saw him buried alive and only just able to claw himself to the surface, emerging in a state of near-breakdown
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H.L. Mencken
Henry Louis Mencken (September 12, 1880 – January 29, 1956) was an American journalist, satirist, cultural critic and scholar of American English.[1] Known as the "Sage of Baltimore", he is regarded as one of the most influential American writers and prose stylists of the first half of the 20th century. He commented widely on the social scene, literature, music, prominent politicians and contemporary movements. His satirical reporting on the Scopes trial, which he dubbed the "Monkey Trial", also gained him attention. As a scholar, Mencken is known for The American Language, a multi-volume study of how the English language is spoken in the United States
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Robert Benchley
Robert Charles Benchley (September 15, 1889 – November 21, 1945) was an American humorist best known for his work as a newspaper columnist and film actor. From his beginnings at The Harvard Lampoon
The Harvard Lampoon
while attending Harvard University, through his many years writing essays and articles for Vanity Fair and The New Yorker
The New Yorker
and his acclaimed short films, Benchley's style of humor brought him respect and success during his life, from his peers at the Algonquin Round Table
Algonquin Round Table
in New York City to contemporaries in the burgeoning film industry. Benchley is best remembered for his contributions to The New Yorker, where his essays, whether topical or absurdist, influenced many modern humorists
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Paul Gallico
Paul William Gallico (July 26, 1897 – July 15, 1976) was an American novelist, short story and sports writer. Many of his works were adapted for motion pictures. He is perhaps best remembered for The Snow Goose, his only real critical success, and for the novel The Poseidon Adventure, primarily through the 1972 film adaptation.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Career as a fiction writer 3 Later life 4 Paul Gallico's style and themes 5 Popular culture 6 Works6.1 Bibliography 6.2 Select list of adaptations7 References 8 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Gallico was born in New York City. His father was the Italian concert pianist, composer and music teacher Paolo Gallico (Trieste, May 13, 1868 – New York, July 6, 1950), and his mother, Hortense Erlich, came from Austria; they had emigrated to New York in 1895
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Irvin S. Cobb
Irvin Shrewsbury Cobb (June 23, 1876 – March 11, 1944) was an American author, humorist, editor and columnist from Paducah, Kentucky, who relocated to New York in 1904, living there for the remainder of his life. He wrote for the New York World, Joseph Pulitzer's newspaper, as the highest paid staff reporter in the United States. Cobb also wrote more than 60 books and 300 short stories. Some of his works were adapted for silent movies. Several of his Judge Priest short stories were adapted in the 1930s for two feature films directed by John Ford.Contents1 Biography1.1 Writing career 1.2 Hollywood 1.3 Personal life2 Fiction 3 Bibliography 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Cobb was the second of four children born to Kentucky natives in Paducah, Kentucky. His maternal grandfather, Reuben Saunders, M.D., is credited with discovering in 1873 that hypodermic use of morphine-atropine halted cholera
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John Galsworthy
BritishParent(s) John Galsworthy
John Galsworthy
(father)Notable awards Nobel Prize in Literature 1932Signature John Galsworthy
John Galsworthy
OM (/ˈɡɔːlzwɜːrði/; 14 August 1867 – 31 January 1933) was an English novelist and playwright. Notable works include The Forsyte Saga
The Forsyte Saga
(1906–1921) and its sequels, A Modern Comedy and End of the Chapter. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature
Nobel Prize in Literature
in 1932.Contents1 Life 2 Adaptations 3 The Forsyte Family 4 Other Selected works 5 Notes and references 6 Further reading 7 External linksLife[edit] Galsworthy was born at what is now known as Galsworthy House (then called Parkhurst)[1] on Kingston Hill in Surrey, England, the son of John and Blanche Bailey (née Bartleet) Galsworthy
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MacKinlay Kantor
MacKinlay Kantor
MacKinlay Kantor
(February 4, 1904 – October 11, 1977),[1] born Benjamin McKinlay Kantor, was an American journalist, novelist and screenwriter. He wrote more than 30 novels, several set during the American Civil War, and was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction
Pulitzer Prize for Fiction
in 1956 for his 1955 novel, Andersonville. He also wrote the novel Gettysburg, set during the Civil War.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Marriage and family 3 Career3.1 Stories, journalism, and novels 3.2 Films 3.3 Publishing4 Death 5 Bibliography5.1 Novels 5.2 Collections 5.3 Children's and young-adult books 5.4 Nonfiction 5.5 Highly anthologised stories6 Filmography 7 Legacy and honors 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Kantor was born and grew up in Webster City, Iowa, the second child and only son in his family. He had a sister, Virginia
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F. Hugh Herbert
Frederick Hugh Herbert
Hugh Herbert
(May 29, 1897 - May 17, 1958) was a playwright, screenwriter, novelist, short story writer, and infrequent film director.Contents1 Biography 2 Partial filmography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Vienna, Austria, Herbert was educated at the University of London.[1] He began his film career in 1926 with two projects starring Conrad Nagel, The Waning Sex
The Waning Sex
and There You Are!, the latter adapted from his play of the same title. His screenwriting credits included Vanity Fair, Fashions of 1934; Smarty in 1934, adapted from his own play; Sitting Pretty; Dark Command; Our Very Own; The Little Hut; Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay! and The Girls of Pleasure Island, the last two of which he also directed
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H.G. Wells
Herbert George Wells[3][4] (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946), usually referred to as H. G. Wells, was an English writer. He was prolific in many genres, writing dozens of novels, short stories, and works of social commentary, satire, biography, and autobiography, including even two books on war games. He is now best remembered for his science fiction novels and is often called a "father of science fiction", along with Jules Verne
Jules Verne
and Hugo Gernsback.[5][6][a] During his own lifetime, however, he was most prominent as a forward-looking, even prophetic social critic who devoted his literary talents to the development of a progressive vision on a global scale. A futurist, he wrote a number of utopian works and foresaw the advent of airplanes, tanks, space travel, nuclear weapons, satellite television and something resembling the World Wide Web.[7] His science fiction imagined time travel, alien invasion, invisibility, and biological engineering
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Louis Bromfield
Louis Bromfield
Louis Bromfield
(December 27, 1896 – March 18, 1956) was an American author and conservationist. He gained international recognition, winning the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
and pioneering innovative scientific farming concepts.Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit]Best man Louis Bromfield
Louis Bromfield
(center) at the wedding of Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
at Malabar Farm
Malabar Farm
(May 21, 1945) Louis Bromfield
Louis Bromfield
was born in Mansfield, Ohio, in 1896 to Charles Brumfield, originally from New England, and Annette Marie Coulter Brumfield, the daughter of an Ohio
Ohio
pioneer
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Frank Sinatra
Francis Albert Sinatra
Sinatra
(/sɪˈnɑːtrə/; December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer, actor, and producer who was one of the most popular and influential musical artists of the 20th century. He is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold more than 150 million records worldwide.[2] Born in Hoboken, New Jersey, to Italian immigrants, Sinatra
Sinatra
began his musical career in the swing era with bandleaders Harry James
Harry James
and Tommy Dorsey. Sinatra
Sinatra
found success as a solo artist after he signed with Columbia Records
Columbia Records
in 1943, becoming the idol of the "bobby soxers". He released his debut album, The Voice
The Voice
of Frank Sinatra, in 1946
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Groucho Marx
Julius Henry Marx (October 2, 1890 – August 19, 1977), known professionally as Groucho
Groucho
Marx (/ˈɡraʊtʃoʊ ˈmɑːrks/), was an American comedian, writer, stage, film, radio, and television star.[1] He was known as a master of quick wit and is widely considered one of the best comedians of the modern era.[2] He made 13 feature films with his siblings the Marx Brothers, of whom he was the third-born. He also had a successful solo career, most notably as the host of the radio and television game show You Bet Your Life.[1] His distinctive appearance, carried over from his days in vaudeville, included quirks such as an exaggerated stooped posture, glasses, cigar, and a thick greasepaint mustache and eyebrows
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George Bernard Shaw
George Bernard Shaw
George Bernard Shaw
(26 July 1856 – 2 November 1950), known at his insistence simply as Bernard Shaw, was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist, and political activist. His influence on Western theatre, culture and politics extended from the 1880s to his death and beyond. He wrote more than sixty plays, including major works such as Man and Superman
Man and Superman
(1902), Pygmalion (1912) and Saint Joan (1923). With a range incorporating both contemporary satire and historical allegory, Shaw became the leading dramatist of his generation, and in 1925 was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. Born in Dublin, Shaw moved to London in 1876, where he struggled to establish himself as a writer and novelist, and embarked on a rigorous process of self-education. By the mid-1880s he had become a respected theatre and music critic
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Shirley Temple
Shirley Temple
Shirley Temple
Black[note 1] (April 23, 1928 – February 10, 2014) was an American actress, singer, dancer, businesswoman, and diplomat who was Hollywood's number one box-office draw as a child actress from 1935 to 1938. As an adult, she was named United States ambassador to Ghana
Ghana
and to Czechoslovakia, and also served as Chief of Protocol of the United States. Temple began her film career at the age of three in 1932. Two years later, she achieved international fame in Bright Eyes, a feature film designed specifically for her talents. She received a special Juvenile Academy Award in February 1935 for her outstanding contribution as a juvenile performer in motion pictures during 1934. Film hits such as Curly Top and Heidi followed year after year during the mid-to-late 1930s
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