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Levin Kipnis
Levin Kipnis
Levin Kipnis
(Hebrew: לֶוִין קִיפְּנִיס‬; 1 August 1894 – 20 June 1990) was an Israeli children's author and poet who wrote mainly in Hebrew
Hebrew
and Yiddish. He won the Israel prize in 1978.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Awards and honors 3 Bibliography3.1 Books Published in Hebrew3.1.1 Children3.2 Books in Translation4 See also 5 ReferencesBiography[edit] Kipnis was born in Ushomir in Volhynian Governorate
Volhynian Governorate
which was part of the Pale of Settlement
Pale of Settlement
of the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
(now in Ukraine), into a family of 12. His father, Pessach, who was a shaliach tzibbur, sent him to study in a Cheder, which he didn't like because of the strict discipline. He showed a passion for the arts from a young age, painting and woodcarving
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Firstborn
A firstborn (also known as an eldest child or sometimes firstling) is the first child born to in the birth order of a couple through childbirth. Historically, the role of the first born child has been socially significant, particularly for a first born son in patriarchal societies. In law, many systems have incorporated the concept of primogeniture, wherein the first-born child inherits their parent's property. The firstborn in Judaism, the bechor, is also accorded a special position. While an only child will by definition also always be the "firstborn", in larger families the firstborn often perceives himself or herself to be treated differently from later children. Alfred Adler (1870–1937), an Austrian psychiatrist, and a contemporary of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung, was one of the first theorists to suggest that birth order influences personality in the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century
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Arabic
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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Safed
Safed
Safed
(Hebrew: צְפַת‬ Tsfat, Ashkenazi: Tzfas, Biblical: Ṣ'fath; Arabic: صفد‎, Ṣafad) is a city in the Northern District of Israel
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Berlin, Germany
Berlin
Berlin
(/bɜːrˈlɪn/, German: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn] ( listen)) is the capital and the largest city of Germany, as well as one of its 16 constituent states. With a steadily growing population of approximately 3.7 million,[4] Berlin
Berlin
is the second most populous city proper in the European Union
European Union
behind London
London
and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union.[5] Located in northeastern Germany
Germany
on the banks of the rivers Spree
Spree
and Havel, it is the centre of the Berlin- Brandenburg
Brandenburg
Metropolitan Region, which has roughly 6 million residents from more than 180 nations.[6][7][8][9] Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin
Berlin
is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
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Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
(Hebrew: תֵּל אָבִיב‬, [tel aˈviv], Arabic: تل أَبيب‎) is the second most populous city in Israel
Israel
– after Jerusalem
Jerusalem
– and the most populous city in the conurbation of Gush Dan, Israel's largest metropolitan area. Located on the country's Mediterranean coastline and with a population of 438,818, it is the financial and technological center of the country
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Sara Levi-Tanai
Sara Levi-Tanai (Hebrew: שרה לוי-תנאי‎; c. 1910 – 3 October 2005) was an Israeli choreographer and song writer. She was the founder and artistic director of the Inbal Dance Theater and recipient of the Israel Prize in dance. Prizes and awards[edit]In 1964, Levi-Tannai's Book of Ruth won an award from the Théâtre des Mondes in Paris. In 1973, she was awarded the Israel Prize, in dance, for her contributions in the field of performing arts.[1][2] In 1984, she won the Moshe Halevi Theater Prize, awarded by the Tel Aviv Municipality. In 1986, she was the first recipient of the Israel Labor Federation (Histadrut) Prize for music and dance. In 1988, she was made an honored citizen of Tel Aviv.See also[edit]List of Israel Prize recipientsReferences[edit]^ Cohen, Selma Jeanne (1998). International Encyclopedia of Dance: 4. Oxford University Press. p. 155
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
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Russian Language
Russian (Russian: ру́сский язы́к, tr. rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language
East Slavic language
and an official language in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
and many minor or unrecognised territories throughout Eurasia
Eurasia
(particularly in Eastern Europe, the Baltics, the Caucasus, and Central Asia). It is an unofficial but widely spoken language in Latvia, Moldova, Ukraine
Ukraine
and to a lesser extent, the other post-Soviet states.[31][32] Russian belongs to the family of Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
and is one of the four living members of the East Slavic languages
Slavic languages
(which in turn is part of the larger Balto-Slavic branch)
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Lamdan Prize
The Lamdan Prize was an Israeli prize awarded annually, from 1954 to 1983, for literary works for children and youth. The prize was presented by the Ramat Gan
Ramat Gan
Municipality in conjunction with the Hebrew Writers Association in Israel
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Israel Prize
The Israel
Israel
Prize (Hebrew: פרס ישראל‬) is an award handed out by the State of Israel
Israel
and is generally regarded as the state's highest cultural honor.[1] It is presented annually, on Israeli Independence Day, in a state ceremony in Jerusalem, in the presence of the President, the Prime Minister, the Speaker of the Knesset (Israel's legislature), and the Supreme Court President
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Be'er Sheva
Beersheba, also spelled Beer-Sheva (/bɪərˈʃiːbə/; Hebrew: בְּאֵר שֶׁבַע‬  Be'er Sheva [be.eʁˈʃeva]; Arabic: بئر السبع‎  Bi'ir as-Sab  [biːr esˈsabeʕ]), is the largest city in the Negev
Negev
desert of southern Israel. Often referred to as the "Capital of the Negev", it is the center of the fourth most populous metropolitan area in Israel, the eighth most populous Israeli city with a population of 205,810,[1] and the second largest city with a total area of 117,500 dunams (after Jerusalem). With an ancient history, and long used as a bedouin encampment, the modern history of Beersheva began at the start of the 20th century when a permanent settlement was established by the Ottoman Turks.[2] The Battle of Beersheba
Beersheba
was part of a wider British offensive in World War I aimed at breaking the Turkish defensive line from Gaza to Beersheba
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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