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Leucadia National Corporation
LEUCADIA NATIONAL CORPORATION is an American holding company that, through its subsidiaries, engages in mining "> was a bid in 2004 to acquire 50 percent of telecommunications company MCI 's common stock. However, after MCI received higher bids from other companies, Leucadia withdrew from the bidding process. SUBSIDIARIES AND INVESTMENTS* Financial Services * Jefferies Group * Berkadia Commercial Mortgage (50/50 joint venture with Berkshire Hathaway ) * HomeFed (65% ownership) * FXCM (January 2015 loan, 49.9%) * Merchant Banking
Banking
* National Beef Packing (78.9% ownership) * HRG Group (23%) * Vitesse Energy (96%) * Juneau Energy (98%) * Garcadia Holdings (Joint venture with Ken Garff Automotive Group) * Linkem (55%) * Conwed Plastics (100%) * Idaho Timber (100%)MERGER WITH THE JEFFERIES GROUPOn November 12, 2012, Jefferies Group announced its merger with Leucadia, its largest shareholder. Jefferies was valued at $3.8 billion at the time of the acquisition. Jefferies remains independent and is the largest operating company within Leucadia. On March 1, 2013, Leucadia bought the Jefferies Group for $3.6 billion. The company’s founders, Ian M. Cumming and Joseph S. Steinberg, stepped down from their management roles after the merger, with Mr. Steinberg staying on as chairman
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Types Of Business Entity
A BUSINESS ENTITY is an entity that is formed and administered as per commercial law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations , cooperatives , partnerships , sole traders , limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province. Some of these types are listed below, by country. For guidance, approximate equivalents in the company law of English-speaking countries are given in most cases, ≈ public limited company (UK, Ireland and the Commonwealth) ≈ Ltd.
Ltd.
(UK, Ireland and the Commonwealth) ≈ limited partnership = unlimited partnership = chartered company = statutory company = holding company = subsidiary company = one man company (sole proprietor ) = NGOs However, the regulations governing particular types of entity, even those described as roughly equivalent, differ from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. When creating or restructuring a business, the legal responsibilities will depend on the type of business entity chosen
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Public Company
A PUBLIC, PUBLICLY TRADED, PUBLICLY HELD COMPANY, or PUBLIC CORPORATION is a corporation whose ownership is dispersed among the general public in many shares of stock which are freely traded on a stock exchange or in over the counter markets. In some jurisdictions, public companies over a certain size must be listed on an exchange. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Securities of a company * 2.1 Advantages * 2.2 Disadvantages * 2.3 Stockholders * 3 General trend * 4 Privatization * 5 Trading and valuation * 6 See also * 7 References HISTORYIn the early modern period, the Dutch developed several financial instruments and helped lay the foundations of modern financial system. The Dutch East India Company (VOC) became the first company in history to issue bonds and shares of stock to the general public. In other words, the VOC was officially the first publicly traded company, because it was the first company to be ever actually listed on an official stock exchange . While the Italian city-states produced the first transferable government bonds, they did not develop the other ingredient necessary to produce a fully fledged capital market : corporate shareholders. As Edward Stringham (2015) notes, "companies with transferable shares date back to classical Rome, but these were usually not enduring endeavors and no considerable secondary market existed (Neal, 1997, p
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Ticker Symbol
A TICKER SYMBOL or STOCK SYMBOL is an abbreviation used to uniquely identify publicly traded shares of a particular stock on a particular stock market . A stock symbol may consist of letters, numbers or a combination of both. "Ticker symbol" refers to the symbols that were printed on the ticker tape of a ticker tape machine. CONTENTS* 1 Interpreting the symbol * 1.1 Other identifiers * 2 Symbols by Country * 2.1 Canada * 2.2 United Kingdom
United Kingdom
* 2.3 United States
United States
* 2.3.1 Single-letter ticker symbols * 2.4 Other countries * 3 See also * 4 References INTERPRETING THE SYMBOL Stock
Stock
symbols are unique identifiers assigned to each security traded on a particular market. For example, AAPL is for Apple Inc.; OODH is for Orion DHC, Inc.; and HD is for Home Depot, Inc. A stock symbol can consist of letters, numbers, or a combination of both, and is a way to uniquely identify that stock. The symbols were kept as short as possible to reduce the number of characters that had to be printed on the ticker tape , and to make it easy to recognize by traders and investors. The allocation of symbols and formatting convention is specific to each stock exchange. In the US, for example, stock tickers are typically between 1 and 4 letters and represent the company name where possible
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New York Stock Exchange
nyse.com New York Stock
Stock
Exchange U.S. National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
U.S. National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
Front Elevation of the New York Stock
Stock
Exchange. Show map of Lower Manhattan
Lower Manhattan
Show map of New York Show map of the US COORDINATES 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028 Coordinates : 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028 BUILT 1903 ARCHITECT Trowbridge George B. Post ARCHITECTURAL STYLE Classical Revival
Classical Revival
NRHP REFERENCE # 78001877 SIGNIFICANT DATES ADDED TO NRHP June 2, 1978 DESIGNATED NHL June 2, 1978 The NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE (abbreviated as NYSE and nicknamed "THE BIG BOARD" ), is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street , Lower Manhattan
Lower Manhattan
, New York City
New York City
, New York . It is by far the world\'s largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.1 trillion as of May 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013
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S&P 500
The STANDARD & POOR\'S 500, often abbreviated as the S&P 500, or just "the S&P", is an American stock market index based on the market capitalizations of 500 large companies having common stock listed on the NYSE
NYSE
or NASDAQ
NASDAQ
. The S&P 500 index components and their weightings are determined by S&P Dow Jones Indices . It differs from other U.S. stock market indices, such as the Dow Jones Industrial Average or the Nasdaq Composite index, because of its diverse constituency and weighting methodology . It is one of the most commonly followed equity indices, and many consider it one of the best representations of the U.S. stock market, and a bellwether for the U.S. economy. The National Bureau of Economic Research has classified common stocks as a leading indicator of business cycles. The S&P 500 was developed and continues to be maintained by S&P Dow Jones Indices, a joint venture majority-owned by S&P Global . S&P Dow Jones Indices publishes many stock market indices such as the Dow Jones Industrial Average , S&P MidCap 400 , the S&P SmallCap 600 , and the S&P Composite 1500 . It is a free-float capitalization-weighted index , and has many ticker symbols , such as: ^GSPC, INX, and $SPX
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Conglomerate (company)
A CONGLOMERATE is the combination of two or more corporations engaged in entirely different businesses that fall under one corporate group , usually involving a parent company and many subsidiaries . Often, a conglomerate is a MULTI-INDUSTRY COMPANY. Conglomerates are often large and multinational . Conglomerates were popular in the 1960s due to a combination of low interest rates and a repeating bear/bull market , which allowed the conglomerates to buy companies in leveraged buyouts , sometimes at temporarily deflated values. Famous examples from the 1960s include Ling-Temco-Vought , ITT
ITT
Corporation
Corporation
, Litton Industries , Textron , Teledyne
Teledyne
. Because of low interest on the loans, the overall return on investment of the conglomerate appeared to grow. Also, the conglomerate had a better ability to borrow in the money market , or capital market , than the smaller firm at their community bank . For many years this was enough to make the company's stock price rise, as companies were often valued largely on their return on investment. The aggressive nature of the conglomerators themselves was enough to make many investors, who saw a "powerful" and seemingly unstoppable force in business, buy their stock. High stock prices allowed them to raise more loans, based on the value of their stock, and thereby buy even more companies
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New York City
Bronx , Kings (Brooklyn) , New York
York
(Manhattan) , Queens
Queens
, Richmond (Staten Island) ------------------------- HISTORIC COLONIES New Netherland
New Netherland
Province of New York
Province of New York
SETTLED 1624 CONSOLIDATED 1898 NAMED FOR James, Duke of York
York
GOVERNMENT • TYPE Mayor–Council • BODY New York City Council
New York City Council
• MAYOR Bill de Blasio
Bill de Blasio
(D ) AREA • TOTAL 468.484 sq mi (1,213.37 km2) • LAND 302.643 sq mi (783.84 km2) • WATER 165.841 sq mi (429.53 km2) • METRO 13,318 sq mi (34,490 km2) ELEVATION 33 ft (10 m) POPULATION (2010 ) • TOTAL 8,175,133 • ESTIMATE (2016) 8,537,673 • RANK 1st, U.S
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New York (state)
NEW YORK is a state in the northeastern United States
United States
. New York
New York
was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States
United States
. With an estimated 19.8 million residents in 2015, it is the fourth-most-populous state in the United States. The state's largest city, New York City
New York City
, makes up over 40% of the population of New York
New York
State. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area , and nearly 40% lives on Long Island . The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York , future King James II of England . With an estimated population of 8.55 million in 2015, New York City
New York City
is the most populous city in the United States
United States
and the premier gateway for legal immigration to the United States
United States
. The New York
New York
Metropolitan Area is one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world. New York City
City
is a global city , home to the United Nations Headquarters and has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, as well as the world's most economically powerful city
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United States
Coordinates : 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America _ Flag Great Seal MOTTO: " In God We Trust " Other traditional mottos _ * " E pluribus unum " ( Latin
Latin
) (de facto) "Out of many, one" * " Annuit c
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World
The WORLD is the planet Earth
Earth
and all life upon it, including human civilization . In a philosophical context, the world is the whole of the physical Universe
Universe
, or an ontological world. In a theological context, the _world_ is the material or the profane sphere, as opposed to the celestial, spiritual, transcendent or sacred. The "end of the world " refers to scenarios of the final end of human history, often in religious contexts. History of the world is commonly understood as spanning the major geopolitical developments of about five millennia, from the first civilizations to the present. In terms such as world religion , world language , world government , and world war , _world_ suggests international or intercontinental scope without necessarily implying participation of the entire world. World population
World population
is the sum of all human populations at any time; similarly, world economy is the sum of the economies of all societies or countries, especially in the context of globalization . Terms like world championship , gross world product , world flags imply the sum or combination of all current-day sovereign states
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Richard B. Handler
RICHARD B. "RICH" HANDLER (born May 23, 1961) is an American businessman , currently serving as the Chairman of the Board and CEO of Jefferies Group , where he is the longest-tenured CEO on Wall Street. Handler also serves as the CEO and director of Leucadia . CONTENTS * 1 Early life and education * 2 Professional career * 3 Compensation * 4 References * 5 External links EARLY LIFE AND EDUCATIONHandler grew up in New Jersey , graduating in 1979 from Pascack Hills High School in Montvale . Handler received a BA in economics from the University of Rochester in 1983 and an MBA from Stanford University in 1987. Before graduate school , he worked as an investment banker at First Boston
First Boston
, and after as a junk bond trader for Michael Milken
Michael Milken
at Drexel Burnham Lambert
Drexel Burnham Lambert
. PROFESSIONAL CAREERHandler joined Jefferies in April 1990 as a salesman and trader and was appointed CEO on January 1, 2001, Chairman in 2002. During his time at Jefferies, between 1990 and 2012, shares compounded annually at 22%. On November 12, 2012, Jefferies announced its merger with Leucadia, its largest shareholder. At that time, Leucadia common shares were trading at $21.14 per share. As of December 31, 2015, Leucadia shares were trading at $17.39 per share
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Chief Executive Officer
A CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO) is the position of the most senior corporate officer, executive , leader or administrator in charge of managing an organization . CEOs lead a range of organizations, including public and private corporations, non-profit organizations and even some government organizations (e.g., Crown corporations ). The CEO of a corporation or company typically reports to the board of directors and is charged with maximizing the value of the entity, which may include maximizing the share price, market share, revenues, or another element. In the non-profit and government sector, CEOs typically aim at achieving outcomes related to the organization's mission, such as reducing poverty, increasing literacy, etc. Titles also often given to the holder of CEO position include president , CHIEF EXECUTIVE (CE), and MANAGING DIRECTOR (MD), as well as REPRESENTATIVE DIRECTOR (RD) in Japan . CONTENTS * 1 Responsibilities * 2 Characteristics * 2.1 Celebrities * 3 International use * 4 Related positions * 4.1 US * 4.2 UK * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 Further reading * 8 External links RESPONSIBILITIESThe responsibilities of an organization's CEO are set by the organization's board of directors or other authority, depending on the organization's legal structure. They can be far-reaching or quite limited and are typically enshrined in a formal delegation of authority
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President (corporate Title)
The PRESIDENT is a leader of an organization, company, community, club, trade union, university or other group. In many organizations, it is the legally recognized highest "titled" corporate officer, ranking above the various Vice Presidents (e.g. Senior Vice President and Executive Vice President). The president may also be the chairperson . The relationship between the president and the Chief Executive Officer varies, depending on the structure of the specific organization. In a similar vein to the Chief Operating Officer , the title of corporate President as a separate position (as opposed to being combined with a "C-Suite " designation, such as "President and Chief Executive Officer" or "President and Chief Operating Officer") is also loosely defined. The powers of the president vary widely across organizations and such powers come from specific authorization in the bylaws (e.g. the president can make an "executive decision" only if the bylaws allow for it). CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Duties at meetings * 3 Powers and authority * 4 Disciplinary procedures * 5 President-Elect * 6 Immediate Past President * 7 References * 8 Further reading HISTORYOriginally, the term "president" was used to designate someone who presided over a meeting, and was used in the same way that "foreman" or "overseer" is used now (the term is still used in that sense today)
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Chairman
The CHAIRMAN (also CHAIRPERSON, CHAIRWOMAN or CHAIR) is the highest officer of an organized group such as a board , a committee , or a deliberative assembly . The person holding the office is typically elected or appointed by the members of the group. The chairman presides over meetings of the assembled group and conducts its business in an orderly fashion. When the group is not in session, the officer's duties often include acting as its head, its representative to the outside world and its spokesperson. In some organizations, this position is also called _president _ (or other title), in others, where a board appoints a president (or other title), the two different terms are used for distinctly different positions. CONTENTS * 1 Terminology * 2 Usage * 3 Vice chairman and deputy chairman * 4 Public corporations * 4.1 Chairman and CEO * 4.2 Executive chairman * 4.3 Non-executive chairman * 4.4 Examples * 5 Duties at meetings * 6 Powers and authority * 7 Disciplinary procedures * 8 See also * 9 References * 10 Further reading TERMINOLOGYOther terms sometimes used for the office and its holder include _chair_, _chairperson_, _chairwoman_, _presiding officer_, _president_, _moderator _, facilitator, and _convenor_. The chairman of a parliamentary chamber is often called the _speaker _. The term _chair_ is sometimes used in lieu of chairman, in response to criticisms that using chairman is sexist
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United States Dollar
UNITED STATES East Timor
East Timor
Ecuador
Ecuador
El Salvador
El Salvador
Marshall Islands Federated States of Micronesia Palau
Palau
Panama
Panama
Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe
3 non-U.S
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